Human Geography Too
Follow
Find
950 views | +0 today
Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
onto Human Geography Too
Scoop.it!

Linguistic Diversity at Home

Linguistic Diversity at Home | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

"Counties where at least 10 percent of people speak a language other than English at home."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 5, 2013 11:34 AM

The presence of large numbers of people that speak languages other than English at home occurs on the east and west coasts of the U.S., but largely in the south and western areas of the U.S..  In high school we used to have discussions about how there were many immigrants coming into the U.S. from or through Mexico.  With migration comes cultural diffusion, as the people coming into the United States bring their language and many other cultural elements of their country of origin with them.  I know there are certain neighborhoods in cities in Rhode Island where most people that I see on the street are speaking Spanish.  I have a relative that has married an immigrant from Guatemala, and she learned that the North East coast of the U.S. Is where many people from Central America move to- often in groups that settle as communities to help each other.  I can understand that it is essential to live near people that speak your language, and it makes sense that their strength and comfort in numbers is also a way of having a "home away from home."  Being the area of the world on the southern land border of the U.S., and that Central America consists mainly of Spanish speakers, it fills in the Southern areas of the U.S. with people that speak a language other than English.  The coasts overall can be explained as being populated by people that speak languages other than English at home because they contain ports of travel and trade, and are points where many flights from other countries would land and drop off travelers and migrants.  That and beautiful ocean views make the coasts a great place for foreigners to settle and live.  These pull factors are likely influential reasons for people to relocate to the areas on the map.

Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 10, 2013 8:02 PM

This map does not bring many surprises.  Places where there are a lot of Spanish speaking families are present in places where many Spanish people immigrate to, along the Mexican border and the southern tip of Florida, where Cuba is close by.  One interesting thing about the French areas seen in Louisiana is that their version of French is a regional dialect. Not only is their a cluster of French speaking families, but they are all speaking a language native to the region.  It is very surprising that there are not as many French speaking families along the Canadien border.

Maria Lopez's curator insight, February 6, 9:29 AM

This map is a great visual showing how multicultural the United States has become. This change is visible however is more states than others. For example, Most of the West Coast and Texas is made up of bilinguals that can speak both English and Spanish. I believe because they are so close to Mexico and that California sees a large influx of immigrants this would make sense. In addition, Florida is also another state that sees immigrants entering from overseas and has a large Cuban population because of this that Florida would be bilingual as well. It is interesting to see that in both Hawaii and Arizona, indigenous Native American languages are still spoken. Finally, the Dakota's have a large population of German speakers which I would have never associated together in the past. It is very interesting to see if these languages expand any further in the next ten years.

Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Globalization and the Textile Industry

"On the 100th anniversary of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire, little has changed in the global sweatshop economy. Workers are again trapped and burned to death behind locked exit gates."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 11:57 AM

One of the first industries to be impacted by what is today called globalization was the textile industry and the successive waves of globalization continue to alter the geography of the textile industry.  This video shows how historical problems in the U.S. textile industry are seen today in countries such as Bangladesh, as does this interactive feature.  The following paragraph is from a Geography News Network podcast / article that Julie Dixon and I co-authored for Maps101 about the Bangladeshi garment industry:     


Many developing countries with the majority of their laborers working in agriculture welcome outsourced labor from the West. This is seen as a way to nurture industrialization, even if it is on the terms of trans-national corporations. Countless workers seek employment in textile factories simply because low pay is still an entry into the cash economy and it is one of the few jobs rural migrants can find when they first enter the big city. In such locations, Western labor, construction, and environmental standards are not priorities because the population’s basic needs haven’t been met, so the responsibility falls to the global companies—but their aim is to cut costs as much as possible to remain competitive.  From its emergence in textiles back in the late 1970’s, Bangladesh in 2013 made $19 billion in the export-oriented, ready-made garment industry, employing 4 million workers, most of whom are women. 


Listen to more of this Geography News Network podcast or read it here. 


Tags: Bangladesh, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

L.Long's curator insight, April 15, 3:53 PM

A good example of dominance and dependence

Kelly Collinsworth's curator insight, April 16, 5:42 AM

For Beth Manor

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How architectural innovations migrate across borders

"As the world's cities undergo explosive growth, inequality is intensifying. Wealthy neighborhoods and impoverished slums grow side by side, the gap between them widening. In this eye-opening talk, architect Teddy Cruz asks us to rethink urban development from the bottom up. Sharing lessons from the slums of Tijuana, Cruz explores the creative intelligence of the city's residents and offers a fresh perspective on what we can learn from places of scarcity."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 8, 4:41 AM

As a geographer native to the San Diego region with family on both sides of the border, I found this TED talk very compelling personally, but also rich in geographic themes (city planning, diffusion, governance of space, socioeconomic differences in land use patterns, etc.).  Relations across the border are economic, cultural and political in nature, and the merger of those varied interests have led to an uneven history of both cooperation and separation.  San Diego and Tijuana have more to offer each other than economic markets--the ideas born out of distinct socioeconomic and political contexts can be just what is needed on the other side of the border.


Tagsurban, unit 7 cities, housing, economic, sprawlneighborhood, borders. planning, urban ecology, densityplanning, TED

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

If the Earth Stood Still

If the Earth Stood Still | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

"The following is not a futuristic scenario. It is not science fiction. It is a demonstration of the results of an extremely unlikely, yet intellectually fascinating query: What would happen if the earth stopped spinning?  ArcGIS was used to perform complex raster analysis and volumetric computations and generate maps that visualize these results.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Tracey M Benson's curator insight, April 4, 1:49 PM

What a fascinating question, answered as a visualisation: What would happen if the earth stopped spinning? ArcGIS was used to perform complex raster analysis and volumetric computations and generate maps that visualise the results.

Christian Allié's curator insight, April 5, 1:40 AM

........""""""""""""""""""""""......

 

[ ... ]

 

......... 

Most scientists agree that the solar day (related to the speed of rotation) is continuously getting longer. This minimal increase of the day length is due mainly to the oceanic tidal friction. When the estimated rate of the slowdown was projected back to past geologic eons, it showed that the length of a day was several hours shorter than today.

Consequently, during the Devonian period (400 million years ago), the earth rotated about 40 more times during one revolution around the sun than it does now. Because the continents have drifted significantly since that time, it is difficult to make estimates of the land versus ocean outlines for that era. However, we can be certain that—with a faster spinning speed in the past—the equatorial bulge of oceanic water was much larger then than it is today. Similarly, the ellipsoidal flattening of the earth was also more significant.

The influence of the rate of the earth's rotation has a dominant effect on the geometry of the globe, in terms of the globe's overall shape as well as the outline of the global ocean. The earth's physical relief is only a secondary factor controlling the delineation of oceans. The slowdown of earth's rotation will continue for 4 billion years—as long as we can imagine. The slowdown infinitesimally—but steadily—changes the globe's geometry and makes it dynamic. The net result of these dynamic adjustments is that the earth is slowly becoming more and more like a sphere. However, it will take billions of years before the earth stops spinning, and the gravitational equipotential creates a mean sea level that is a perfect sphere.

 

About the Author

Witold Fraczek is a longtime employee of Esri who currently works in the Application Prototype Lab. He received his doctorate in the application of GIS in forestry from Agricultural University and master's degrees in hydrology from the University of Warsaw, Poland, and remote sensing from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, April 9, 7:25 PM

How interesting! The detailed GIS is fascinating and although an unlikely scenario, is great for discussion and deeper thought. You could discuss with students how the world would cope or what sort of device could start it spinning again...?

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Highly concentrated population distribution

Highly concentrated population distribution | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

"Only 2% of Australia's population lives in the yellow area. "


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Ma. Caridad Benitez's curator insight, March 27, 6:01 AM

No hay cama Pa ' tanta Gente! 

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, March 30, 7:10 AM

What could explain the density of the white area? What is it about the yellow area that explains the lack of population?

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 13, 4:32 AM

While the rainfall map offers a lot of explanation for why Australia's population is concentrated in areas of significant rainfall, it is not a complete picture. There could be a number of other factors contributing to the clustered population of Australia. Northern Australia receives significant rainfall, but is sparsely populated so there must be other reasons. A map with more topography would help as it could show mountainous barriers which would hinder expansion or major rivers on which civilizations thrive. Similarly, a climatic map could reveal areas which are tropical and less conducive to large populations of a more temperate climate.

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Gastrodiplomacy: Cooking Up A Tasty Lesson On War And Peace

Gastrodiplomacy: Cooking Up A Tasty Lesson On War And Peace | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
An international relations scholar is using her students' love of food to teach them about global conflicts. It's a form of winning hearts and minds that's gaining traction among world governments.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, March 25, 12:37 PM

The way to world peace may be through our stomachs. Great idea!

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, March 25, 12:38 PM

The way to world peace may be through our hearts and stomachs. Great idea!

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, March 30, 4:58 PM

Vínculos Poderosos! Pilares da Geografia Vivida.

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Seeing Landmarks From Far Away Might Shatter Your Perception Of Them

Seeing Landmarks From Far Away Might Shatter Your Perception Of Them | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
Wow. I guess it's true when they say not everything is as it appears...

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Linh Nguyen's comment, March 21, 8:42 AM
http://thietkenoithatbietthuecopark.com/thiet-ke-biet-thu-dep/ thiết kế nội thất biệt thự sang trọng, hiện đại
Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, March 28, 8:43 AM

LA PERCEPCIÓN A TRAVÉS DE LA DISTANCIA

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 2:33 PM

By looking at these images it is apparent that heir is a clear distincition between how one may view the monument from upclose andd then when you take asep back you can really appreciate it by seeing others appreciate it as well. As an observer you can also identify the different persepectives by looking at it in a different light by either taking a step back or viewing it from a different vanage point. Knowing the history of the monument also helps with a background story in order for better appreciation of the monument and the History that goes along with it.

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Where Each City's Uninsured Live

Where Each City's Uninsured Live | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
Insured people are all alike, but uninsured people are uninsured for their own reasons.

 

It can be tempting to think of 'the uninsured' as the poorest of the poor. But that's not entirely the case. While people living below the poverty line are the most likely to be without health insurance, 28 percent of people who make between 100 and 200 percent of poverty level (up to about $23,340) lack coverage, as do 15 percent of those who make between 200 and 400 percent (up to about $46,700).

These maps, created by Kevin Johnson and used here with permission, show where people not covered by either private or public insurance live in each city. Johnson used the 2012 American Community Survey; higher uninsured rates are represented by red and orange colors.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Teaching Kids about Global Poverty

Teaching Kids about Global Poverty | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

"Living on One Dollar is a full-length documentary made by four college students who traveled to rural Guatemala to live on just a dollar a day. Upon their return, they created Living On One, a nonprofit to raise awareness and inspire action around global issues like hunger and poverty -- and started by publishing the Change Series of video shorts. I found it so compelling I've dedicated this whole film fest to it. Each episode not only succinctly frames an issue faced by people in the developing world and makes it personal, but also offers resource links to learn more -- and even better -- to do something about it."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Character Minutes's curator insight, March 13, 10:24 AM

Several character traits could be empasized using theses videos. The wheels in my mind are turning!

 

Marianne Naughton's curator insight, March 13, 5:14 PM

Fundraiser event taught by kids

lyn chatfield's curator insight, March 17, 8:49 PM

The links

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Lexical Distance Among the Languages of Europe

Lexical Distance Among the Languages of Europe | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

  This chart shows the lexical distance — that is, the degree of overall vocabulary divergence — among the major languages of Europe. The size of each circle represents the number of speakers ...

 

And yes, English has its deepest roots in German...the French aspects were tacked on after the Norman Conquest.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
ethanrobert's curator insight, March 19, 7:20 AM

This is a wonderful map that truly shows language families and their roots. In Europe, I was rather surprised when I seen that the Romance branch was much larger than that of the Germanic. All of the ancient Germanic groups such as the Jutes, Angols, and the Saxons were well versed in combat. Considering they conquered much of Western Europe, how is it that the Romance group is bigger than the Germanic? Also, in Eastern Europe, the Albanian language has no reason to exist. In a region dominated by the Slavic group with no environmental barriers, the Albanian language should not exist.~Ethan.

Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 7:33 PM

Unit II

Ness Crouch's curator insight, March 28, 5:43 PM

This isn't my normal area of interest but I found this fascinating!

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Spoof on Agricultural Standards


Via Seth Dixon
more...
willdonovan's curator insight, March 4, 7:01 PM

Creative fun to spark a conversation. #GSJam

Josune Erkizia's curator insight, March 4, 11:49 PM

Very funny

Marie-Ann Roberts's curator insight, March 5, 12:51 AM

Good for sessions on Animal Welfare and Farm Assurance.

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The End of the ‘Developing World’

The End of the ‘Developing World’ | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
The old labels no longer apply. Rich countries need to learn from poor ones.

 

BILL GATES, in his foundation’s annual letter, declared that “the terms ‘developing countries’ and ‘developed countries’ have outlived their usefulness.” He’s right. If we want to understand the modern global economy, we need a better vocabulary.

Mr. Gates was making a point about improvements in income and gross domestic product; unfortunately, these formal measures generate categories that tend to obscure obvious distinctions. Only when employing a crude “development” binary could anyone lump Mozambique and Mexico together.

It’s tough to pick a satisfying replacement. Talk of first, second and third worlds is passé, and it’s hard to bear the Dickensian awkwardness of “industrialized nations.” Forget, too, the more recent jargon about the “global south” and “global north.” It makes little sense to counterpose poor countries with “the West” when many of the biggest economic success stories in the past few decades have come from the East.

All of these antiquated terms imply that any given country is “developing” toward something, and that there is only one way to get there.

It’s time that we start describing the world as “fat” or “lean.”


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Joanne Wegener's curator insight, March 7, 2:03 AM

Fat or Lean - what sort of world do we live in

An interesting discussion on the way we perceive and label the world.

Ma. Caridad Benitez's curator insight, March 11, 7:15 AM

Hoy en día poca claridad de dónde exactamente queda y quiénes son? 

Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 13, 7:46 AM

UPDATE: this article (from the Atlantic) on the exact same concept would supplement the NY Times article nicely.  

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

A Dictator's Guide to Urban Design

A Dictator's Guide to Urban Design | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
Ukraine's Independence Square, and the revolutionary dimensions of public spaces.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 23, 8:04 PM

This article gives some background on the political purposes behind urban planning and public squares that carry cultural meaning.  While Ukraine is the reason for delving into the topic, the article explores the politicization of public squares in various regional and historical contexts.  The image above shows how monuments, despite their 'official' meaning, can be rearticulated and reinterpreted as other audiences inscribe meaning into the landscape.  

Tracey M Benson's curator insight, February 24, 12:21 PM

Very interesting article about public spaces transformed by public protest.

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Global Perceptions of the United States

Global Perceptions of the United States | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
Placeholder for the Pew Global Indicators Database

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 18, 10:22 AM

In this I saw that when choosing Russia to look at in relation to its relationship with the United States throughtout the years it has both increased and decreased. For example, In 2008 the percentage of relationship with the US and Russia was at 29% then in  2009 it decreased to 27% and then fianlly increasing in 2013 to 31%. As you can see the US and Russia are partners in life today to some extend and have evolved from time to time( past to present).

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, February 21, 9:18 PM

Images...

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 1:25 PM

Kenya is measure as a parter and alliance with the United States for instance, in the Fall of 2009 a report came out and it proved taht 89% thought of Kenya as an alliance. Shockingly enough in 2013 the alliance with Africa drew at a small decrease of 79%.

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Quebec Voters Say 'Non' to Separatists

Quebec Voters Say 'Non' to Separatists | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

"Quebec voters gave a resounding no to the prospects of holding a third referendum on independence from Canada, handing the main separatist party in the French-speaking province one of its worst electoral defeats ever."  

 

Quebec, which is 80 percent French-speaking, has plenty of autonomy already. The province of 8.1 million sets its own income tax, has its own immigration policy favoring French speakers, and has legislation prioritizing French over English.  But many Quebecois have long dreamed of an independent Quebec, as they at times haven't felt respected and have worried about the survival of their language in English-speaking North America.

 

Tags: Canada, political, devolution.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

A tour of the British Isles in accents

Got the audio here - http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01slnp5 The person doing the voice is Andrew Jack who is a dialect coach.

 

Tags: language, culture, English, UK.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Sascha Humphrey's curator insight, April 6, 1:33 AM

He's really quite good, and the seamless change of dialect is quite impressive!

Michael MacNeil's curator insight, April 6, 8:32 AM

The diversity of the English language is amazing.  Even in the "motherland" it changes from location to location...aye bay goom.

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, April 9, 7:19 PM

This is a really interesting video for understanding regional dialect differences!

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Urban Morphology in Mexico City

Urban Morphology in Mexico City | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

"Mexico City is a giant laboratory of urban morphology. Its 20 million residents live in neighborhoods based on a wide spectrum of plans.  The colonial center (above) was built on the foundations of Tenochtitlan, capital of the Aztec empire. The old city was on an island in Lake Texcoco. The lake was drained to prevent flooding as the city expanded.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 27, 9:57 AM

I've conducted research in Mexico City, and am endlessly fascinated but this urban amalgamation.  The city is so extensive that there are numerous morphological patterns that can be seen in the city, including the 12 listed in the article.  


Tags: Mexico, density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 9, 12:48 PM

unit 7

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Human Development Index variation

Human Development Index variation | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

"Here's how the United States looks when it is measured on the county level by the same standards used to rank countries by the UN, the Human Development Index.  Five variables are taken into account: life expectancy, income per capita, school enrollment, percentage of high school graduates, and percentage of college graduates." 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
steve smith's curator insight, March 26, 12:53 PM

A fantastic resource for development studies.

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, March 26, 3:57 PM

Regional patterns?

Brian Altonen's curator insight, March 26, 6:18 PM

A WHO map of what life in the U.S. is like demonstrates the role of urbanization and heavily population regions for defining where U.N.'s Human Development Index scores are highest.

Three of the metrics pertain primarily to education.  The fourth is a measure of financial success for a region.  The fifth is most likely a consequence of scoring well for these first four measures.

An obvious next step in making additional use of this map is to compare its findings with the distributions of various language, culture and ethnic groups in this country, according to most recent US Census patterns.  

 

 

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The World's Most Densely Populated Cities

The World's Most Densely Populated Cities | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
The growth of these cities will create a host of environmental and health problems.

 

By 2210, the global population is expected to grow from just more than 7 billion to 11.3 billion — with 87 percent of the population living in urban areas, according to a new working paper by researchers from NYU’s Marron Institute.

Most of these individuals will be in what’s now the developing world — creating a host of environmental and health problems.

If projections are correct, these new urban dwellers will require the world’s existing cities to expand six-fold to accommodate triple the residents, Richard Florida wrote in The Atlantic. Plus, the world will need 500 new “megacities” of 10 million or more, he wrote.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lola Ripollés's curator insight, March 25, 3:42 PM

Pointed out in the latest report on Construction Industry 

Trends by Accenture, the rise of the Megacities will empower construction whilst raising many environmental and health problems.

Valerie Bauwens's curator insight, March 28, 1:46 AM

Or will there be a natural come back to the country side?

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 2:42 PM

 Cairo, Egypt has a population density of 9,400 residents per square kilometer. THese numbers are crazy think about it compared to MA or RI and our major cities.

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Equality of Opportunity

Equality of Opportunity | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

"Is America the “Land of Opportunity”? In two recent studies, we find that: (1) Upward income mobility varies substantially within the U.S. [summary][paper] Areas with greater mobility tend to have five characteristics: less segregation, less income inequality, better schools, greater social capital, and more stable families. (2) Contrary to popular perception, economic mobility has not changed significantly over time; however, it is consistently lower in the U.S. than in most developed countries [summary][paper]. "


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Linh Nguyen's comment, March 19, 7:56 PM
Nội thất phòng khách đẹp, sang trọng, hiện đại http://noithatgooccho.com/sp/phong-khach/
Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Global Oil Reserves

Global Oil Reserves | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

Who has the oil? http://pic.twitter.com/7Njc7OD8rw


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Richard Lloyd Thomas's curator insight, March 13, 8:22 PM

Inequalities exist as well

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 26, 3:03 PM

This graph depcits Sauda Arabia with the most oil reserves in at 262 Billion barrels and in second place coming in at 132 billion barrels is Iran. These barrels are a very important assett to not only the US but to the world. This is why gas is so expensive because most of the time the US has to import it from differnt countries in order to obtain the amount we need for resources and mostly everything is based on oil as far as some fossil fuels are concerned. 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 14, 2:22 PM

India is demonstrated at 2,000-2,999 in range of bbps. This amount of oil reserves is very important to the revenue of the country and the way that the poeple survive, natural resources such as oil are a very important and costly resource to obtain. Having oil in your country helps with trade and revenue income and trade routes are compiled which helps the economy.

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

3 Cities With Freeways Going Nowhere

3 Cities With Freeways Going Nowhere | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
Once thought to be symbols of prosperity, innercity highways are now just eyesores — and sources of civic dysfunction — to some new urbanists.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 10, 9:00 AM

This TED Talk also explores what cities should be with old freeways, suggesting that they should be dismantled and the spaces revitalized (and yes, my inner-Californian linguistic roots demands that I call them freeways).


Tags: transportation, urban, planning.

Van Brienen Networks Ed van den Berg's curator insight, March 11, 6:44 AM

How's that for Rotterdam

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

19th Century Ship Routes

19th Century Ship Routes | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

"Ben Schmidt, assistant professor of history at Northeastern University, has visualized the routes of 19th Century ships using publicly available data set from NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). The resulting image is a hauntingly beautiful image that outlines the continents and highlights the trade winds. It shows major ports, and even makes a strong visual case for the need for the Panama and Suez Canals."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Tracey M Benson's curator insight, March 10, 1:29 PM

Beautiful data visualisation of 19th century ships using publicly available data set from NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration).

Brian Altonen's curator insight, March 10, 3:21 PM

Lessons in GIS and Medical GIS - Examples of applications. Various Resources at hand.

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Invention Of 'The Economy'

The Invention Of 'The Economy' | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

"Until the Great Depression, nobody talked about 'the economy.' In a sense, it hadn't been invented yet."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Gary Yarus ---> a #WaveOfAction Media Project's curator insight, March 2, 5:27 AM


Seth Dixon's insight:
This podcast is a great discussion on historical evolution of some standard economic measures; it is also a nice reminder that statistics such as GDP don't represent a tangible thing, but are a shaped by how we think about the world around us.  

Darius Douglass's curator insight, March 3, 12:59 PM

A little history here, What we call the GDP is not really scientific #GDP #NationalIncome  #indicator #health

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, March 4, 10:54 AM

Seth Dixon has it right. 

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Political Advocacy for Geo-Education

Political Advocacy for Geo-Education | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

Next week, a delegations from every state alliance will go to Washington D.C. to advocate for geography education and I will represent Rhode Island. On February 26th I will personally meet with Senators Whitehouse and Reed, Congressmen Cicilline and Langevin. I those meetings I will encourage them to become sponsors of the Teaching Geography is Fundamental bill. I would like to encourage you to consider voicing your support for geography education with you representatives. Did you know that Geography is the ONLY required subject that does not receive any dedicated federal funding under No Child Left Behind?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 21, 11:21 AM

If you are a member of your state geographic alliance (and if not, join!) you can help our cause immensely by letting members of Congress know that there is support for geography education and the Teaching Geography is Fundamental Act..  It helps tremendously if they already have heard from constituents about the importance of geography education BEFORE our Feb 26th meetings.   I urge you to join me in a chorus of support for action by Congress. You don’t have to go to DC to help.


You can go to SpeakUpForGeography.org and send pre-written letters directly to your Senators and Representative...please join me in this effort to strengthen geography education in the United States. 

Denise McKinney Ethun's curator insight, February 22, 1:12 PM

As a Social Science teacher and Librarian I urge you to support Geography in our school curriculum.

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

No union, no pound, British official warns Scots backing independence

No union, no pound, British official warns Scots backing independence | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
LONDON – Escalating the fight against secession, the British government warned Thursday that Scotland would lose the right to continue using the pound as its currency if voters there say yes to a historic referendum on independence this fall.

 

Osborne’s stark warning, delivered in a speech in Edinburgh, the Scottish capital, represented a new willingness by unionists to take a hard line in persuading Scottish voters to shun independence in a September plebiscite. A thumbs-up would end Scotland’s 307-year-old marriage to England and Wales and cause the biggest political shakeup in the British Isles since Ireland split from the British crown nearly a century ago.

 

Sturgeon predicted that “what the Treasury says now in the heat of the campaign would be very different to what they say after a democratic vote for independence, when common sense would trump the campaign rhetoric.”


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 15, 12:34 PM

This is an intriguing strategic move by the UK as Scotland considers  independence.  Some have argued that this move will backfire and push more Scottish voters into the "yes" camp.  In related news, the BBC reports that EU officials say that an independent Scotland would have a hard time joining the European Union.  


Tags: devolutionpolitical, states, sovereignty, autonomy, Europe, unit 4 political, currency, economic.
.