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Little England: What's Left If Scotland Leaves?

Little England: What's Left If Scotland Leaves? | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
What is more likely to happen first: Greece will leave the eurozone, or Scotland will leave the UK?

 

Although there is currently only about 30% of Scotland that would support independence, this is something that will be gaining importance.  The United Kingdom is a complex political entity, with Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland connected with England.  The "divorce referendum" will be help on October 2014 to see if Scotland wishes to dissolve this union and many of the political and economic events throughout Europe will be seen through this prism, especially the Euro Zone crisis in southern European countries (e.g.-Italy, Greece, Spain and Portugal).  The possibility that this might happen are small, but as the article stated, "not zero." 

 

Tags: devolution, supranationalism, political, states, sovereignty, autonomy, Europe, unit 4 political.


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 4:27 PM

Good for Scotland... as anyone that has watched Braveheart knows, all they need is Mel Gibson to fight for their independence, and they will surely win!  I know some people that play the bagpies, and I like the Scottish music better than much English music.  I don't know much about the UK, so I have little to guide me in favor or against Scotland declaring independence, but aw heck, why not...  The US declared independence, and it seemed to work out for them until... whenever...? forever? it depends on what you use as criteria to look at it...  But live and let live, let people do what they want, the only advice to that is not to let people harm others.  That way, true peace can be achieved.  Harmony, instead of harm.  So I would advocate for Scotland to wear women's clothing with turtle shells in their crotches and dance to celebrate their independence if that's what they want, as long as there are no epic battle sequences that precede or follow their dancing.  Don't be an elitist, open your eyes, the governments own your brothers and their lives... We must work to change this.

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Alexander von Humboldt

"Have you heard of Alexander von Humboldt? Not likely. The geologist turned geographer and South American explorer was a bit of an 18th century super scientist, traveling over 24,000 miles to understand the relationship between nature and habitat. George Mehler details Humboldt’s major accomplishments and why we should care about them today. See this TED ED lesson plan that accompanies the video."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 18, 1:23 PM

Alexander von Humboldt has been described as the last great ancient geographer concerned with understanding an eclectic cosmography as well as the first modern geographer. He is honored far and wide throughout Latin America and Europe, but given that intellectually people are confused as how to categorize him and classify his contributions, today he is under-appreciated.  Geographers need to reclaim his memory and call his extensive, globetrotting work on a wide range of subjects 'geography.'    


Tags:  historicalbiogeography, unit 1 Geoprinciples, TED.

David R. Perry's curator insight, September 11, 6:41 PM

History does not always remember all it should.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, September 14, 8:35 AM

Notable Geographer and geologist

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Where China and Kazakhstan Meet

Where China and Kazakhstan Meet | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

"While people often say that borders aren’t visible from space, the line between Kazakhstan and China could not be more clear in this satellite image. Acquired by the Landsat 8 satellite on September 9, 2013, the image shows northwestern China around the city of Qoqek and far eastern Kazakhstan near Lake Balqash.

The border between the two countries is defined by land-use policies. In China, land use is intense. Only 11.62 percent of China’s land is arable. Pressed by a need to produce food for 1.3 billion people, China farms just about any land that can be sustained for agriculture. Fields are dark green in contrast to the surrounding arid landscape, a sign that the agriculture is irrigated. As of 2006, about 65 percent of China’s fresh water was used for agriculture, irrigating 629,000 square kilometers (243,000 square miles) of farmland, an area slightly smaller than the state of Texas.

The story is quite different in Kazakhstan. Here, large industrial-sized farms dominate, an artifact of Soviet-era agriculture. While agriculture is an important sector in the Kazakh economy, eastern Kazakhstan is a minor growing area. Only 0.03 percent of Kazakhstan’s land is devoted to permanent agriculture, with 20,660 square kilometers being irrigated. The land along the Chinese border is minimally used, though rectangular shapes show that farming does occur in the region. Much of the agriculture in this region is rain-fed, so the fields are tan much like the surrounding natural landscape."

 

Tags: remote sensing, land use, environment, geospatial, environment modify, food, agriculture, agricultural land change.


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FCHSAPGEO's curator insight, September 4, 12:58 PM

We discussed Landsat images today and borders. Here is a current article to bring it all together.

MsPerry's curator insight, September 6, 1:34 PM

APHG U4

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Where We Came From, State by State

Where We Came From, State by State | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
Charts showing how Americans have moved between states for 112 years.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 14, 10:20 AM

This incredible series of interactive charts from the New York Times show where the residents of every U.S. state were born and how that data has changed over time (update: now available as an interactive map).  This graph of Florida shows that around 1900, most people living in Florida were from the South.  Around the middle of the 20th century more people from other parts of the U.S. and from outside the U.S. started moving in.  What changes in U.S. society led to these demographic shifts?  How has demographics of your state changes over the last 114 years? 

   

On the flip side, many people have been leaving California and this article charts the demographic impact of Californians on other states.  


Tags: migration, USAvisualization, census, unit 2 population.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 17, 12:42 PM

APHG-U2

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Fragile States Index

Fragile States Index | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

"Weak and failing states pose a challenge to the international community. In today’s world, with its highly globalized economy, information systems and interlaced security, pressures on one fragile state can have serious repercussions not only for that state and its people, but also for its neighbors and other states halfway across the globe.  The Fragile States Index (FSI), produced by The Fund for Peace, is a critical tool in highlighting not only the normal pressures that all states experience, but also in identifying when those pressures are pushing a state towards the brink of failure."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 27, 12:31 PM

How can political stability and security be measured?  What constitutes effective governance?  The Fragile States Index (formerly known as the Failed States Index) is a statistical ranking designed to measure the effective political institutions across the globe.  There are  12 social, economic, and political/military categories that are a part of the overall rankings and various indicators are parts of the metrics that are a part of this index are:

SOCIAL

•Demographic Pressures 

•Refugees/IDPs

•Group Grievance

•Human Flight and Brain Drain

ECONOMIC

•Uneven Economic Development

•Poverty and Economic Decline

POLITICAL/MILITARY

•State Legitimacy

•Human Rights and Rule of Law

•Public Services

•Security Apparatus

•Factionalized Elites

•External Intervention


Tags: political, statisticsdevelopment, territoriality, sovereignty, conflict, political, devolution, war.

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, August 27, 9:57 PM

How can political stability and security be measured? The Fragile States Index is a statistical ranking designed to measure the effective political institutions across the globe.

MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 6:49 AM

APHG-Unit 4

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What is a part of the United States?


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pascal simoens's curator insight, August 6, 2:58 PM

qui m'a dit un jour que l'"Europe, c'est compliqué?"...

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 3:54 PM

APHG-U4

CHS AP Human Geography's curator insight, August 17, 2:28 PM

Use in Political Geo unit, or for Canada and US region

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Donut Holes in Law of the Sea

Donut Holes in Law of the Sea | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

"Sovereignty over land defines nation states since 1648. In contrast, sovereign right over the sea was formalised only in 1982. While land borders are well-known, sea borders escape the limelight."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 8, 6:28 PM

These maritime borders mark the economic area is defined by its Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), a 200-nautical mile-wide (370 km) strip of sea along the country’s national coast line.  This regulation, which was installed by the ‘UN Convention on the Law of the Sea’ in 1982, grants a state special rights to exploit natural (such as oil) and marine (for instance fish) resources, including scientific research and energy production (wind-parks, for example).  This interactive map of the EEZs also shows the 'donut holes,' or the seas that are no state can claim that no state can claim.  Given the number of conflicts that are occurring--especially in East Asia--this map becomes a very valuable online resource for teaching political geography. 


Questions to ponder: how does this series of buffer zones around the Earth's land masses impact politics, the environment and local economies?  Where might the EEZs be more important to the success of a country/territory than other regions? 


Tagseconomic, environment, political, resources, water, sovereignty, coastal, environment depend, territoriality, states, conflict, unit 4 political.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 29, 2:48 PM

Option topic Marine  Environments and management

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 3:52 PM

APHG-U4

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How Cities Use Design to Drive Homeless People Away

How Cities Use Design to Drive Homeless People Away | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

"Saying 'you're not welcome here'—with spikes."


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Michael MacNeil's curator insight, August 2, 5:38 AM

Lack of understanding of mental disability can lead to heartlessness. There is so much that needs to be done.

dilaycock's curator insight, August 3, 12:50 AM

I'd never really taken notice, or heard of some,  of the architectural deterrents mentioned here. I can't believe that we, as a society, go to such lengths to make life even more difficult for those already struggling. 

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 3:52 PM

APHG-U7

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A Detailed Map of the Net Migration Flows for Every U.S. County

A Detailed Map of the Net Migration Flows for Every U.S. County | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
People are leaving Minneapolis for Florida, Detroit for the suburbs, and Washington for New York.

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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 5:01 PM

APHG-U2 & U7

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Changes in the U.S. Economic Geography

Changes in the U.S. Economic Geography | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
In 1990, the manufacturing industry was the leading employer in most U.S. states, followed by retail trade. In 2003, retail trade was the leading employer in a majority of states. By 2013, health care and social assistance was the dominant industry in 34 states. This animated map shows the top industry in each state and the District of Columbia from 1990 to 2013.

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Ted Ning's curator insight, August 9, 9:17 AM

Interesting to see how markets, jobs and emerging opportunities have changed. Need to keep up with the times. 

Hongsheng Li's curator insight, August 11, 3:33 AM

美国工业地理的演化

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 7:48 AM

APHG-U6

 

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Artful, Aerial Views of Humanity's Impact

Artful, Aerial Views of Humanity's Impact | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
Using aerial photographs that render imperiled landscapes almost abstract, Edward Burtynsky explores the consequences of human activity bearing down on the earth’s resources.

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Diane Johnson's curator insight, August 11, 5:12 AM

These images may be very useful for teaching the DCI's under the Human Impact topic.

Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, August 11, 3:48 PM

Is this evidence of homgeniziation of landscapes?

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 11, 5:11 PM

People change landscapes. This is a great resource available as an iPad App also Called Burtynsky Water. 

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Visualizing Time and Space

Visualizing Time and Space | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

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sriddle geo's curator insight, July 24, 6:04 AM

Once again the educator in me is at work.  My little girl is asking me all the time , "If it's day here is it night on the other side of the world?"  Now I can show her.

Cory Erlandson's curator insight, July 24, 6:48 AM

Great spatial representation of time and time zones, which is a weirdly fascinating topic for my students.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 4:00 PM

APHG-U1

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World War II Led to a Revolution in Cartography

World War II Led to a Revolution in Cartography | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

"More Americans came into contact with maps during World War II than in any previous moment in American history. From the elaborate and innovative inserts in the National Geographic to the schematic and tactical pictures in newspapers, maps were everywhere. On September 1, 1939, the Nazis invaded Poland, and by the end of the day a map of Europe could not be bought anywhere in the United States. In fact, Rand McNally reported selling more maps and atlases of the European theaters in the first two weeks of September than in all the years since the armistice of 1918. Two years later, the attack on Pearl Harbor again sparked a demand for maps."


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Pierre Mongin 's curator insight, July 20, 12:54 PM

Un exemple sur la manière dont les cartes peuvent changer votre vision du monde, le " mapping" a ce pouvoir là. 

Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 25, 7:04 AM

Global interaction and maps. WWII. 

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 3:59 PM

APHG-U1

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Sustaining Seven Billion People

Sustaining Seven Billion People | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

"With seven billion people now living on Earth, the ever growing demand is putting unprecedented pressure on global resources—especially forests, water, and food. How can Earth’s resources be managed best to support so many people? One key is tracking the sum of what is available, and perhaps nothing is better suited to that task than satellites."

 


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Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, July 6, 9:09 AM

Such studies of the agriculture around the world are essential. The way we are doing agriculture to support seven billion people now, peaking at 9-10 billion in another 60 years, it is clear that we are putting severe strains on the environment.  But we have grown lazy, and we are doing it all wrong.

 

We CAN drastically reduce the amount of meat we consume, and thus quickly reduce the amount of arable land we need.  We CAN grow plants in ways that actually sequester more carbon and improve the soil it over time rather than erode and degrade.  And we CAN in fact grow all the food we need in the space we live in, thus enabling us to recycle all the water used as well, which is mostly just lost in evaporation. 

Tom Cockburn's curator insight, July 13, 2:52 AM

Vital debate for the future

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 4:44 PM

APHG-U2

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How Google represents disputed borders between countries

How Google represents disputed borders between countries | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
INTERNATIONAL borders are often tricky to chart on maps. Tangible topographic features can be pinned down by satellite imagery but the boundaries between many states...

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 4, 9:05 PM

I've shared some links in the past that some mapping dilemmas with current events in Ukraine.  Google Maps shows international borders differently and National Geographic maps show Crimea as a part of Russia.  In this podcast we learn that this isn't the only international border dispute that is displayed differently in Google Maps.  Google uses over 30 distinct versions of international borders because there is an underlying geopolitical dimension to cartographyHowever, this article from the Economist is more explicitly geographic in its analysis of the situation and how the discipline(s) of geography/cartography shape the political situation; maps are NOT just a reflection of reality on the ground.  To paraphrase the cartographer Andy Shears, there is a lot of teaching applications and discussion material in these articles. 


Questions to Ponder: Why have different cartography for different audiences?  Why does this small cartographic decision matter? How can maps be used to lie/stretch the truth?  How to governments derive political legitimacy from maps?   Why is Google the cartographic gatekeeper?


Tags: google, Ukraine, mapping, borders, political.

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 6:10 AM

How does politics affect map-making? 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 8, 9:36 AM

unit 4

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Comparing the five major world religions

"It's perfectly human to grapple with questions, like 'Where do we come from?' and 'How do I live a life of meaning?' These existential questions are central to the five major world religions -- and that's not all that connects these faiths. John Bellaimey explains the intertwined histories and cultures of Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity and Islam."


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Mary Elizabeth's curator insight, August 31, 1:41 PM

perfect for Culture Unit

MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 6:48 AM

APHG-Unit 3

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 6:13 AM

Great insight into our 5 major world religions.

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Topography of Religion

Topography of Religion | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

"The Pew survey sorts people into major groupings--Christians; other religions, including Jewish and Muslim; and 'unaffiliated,' which includes atheist, agnostic and 'nothing in particular.'  Roll your cursor over the map to see how faiths and traditions break down by state."


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Tom Franta's curator insight, August 25, 9:51 AM

Interactive map showing religion by state

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 12:27 PM

APHG-Unit 1

CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 4:09 PM

Awesome interactive map showing the relative religious composition of states.

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Why do competitors open their stores next to one another?

 

"Why are all the gas stations, cafes and restaurants in one crowded spot? As two competitive cousins vie for ice-cream-selling domination on one small beach, discover how game theory and the Nash Equilibrium inform these retail hotspots."


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Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 25, 7:02 AM

Hoteling model

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 3:56 PM

APHG-U6

CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 5:03 PM

For use in understanding the placement of businesses in Human Geography.

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The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising

The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
Scientists have issued a new warning to the world’s coastal megacities that the threat from subsiding land is a more immediate problem than rising sea levels caused by global warming.

 

A new paper from the Deltares Research Institute in the Netherlands published in April identified regions of the globe where the ground level is falling 10 times faster than water levels are rising - with human activity often to blame.

In Jakarta, Indonesia’s largest city, the population has grown from around half a million in the 1930s to just under 10 million today, with heavily populated areas dropping by as much as six and a half feet as groundwater is pumped up from the Earth to drink.

The same practice led to Tokyo’s ground level falling by two meters before new restrictions were introduced, and in Venice, this sort of extraction has only compounded the effects of natural subsidence caused by long-term geological processes.

 

Tags: coastal, climate change, urban, megacities, water, environment, urban ecology.


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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 1, 9:32 PM

Perception!

Matt Evan Dobbie's curator insight, August 2, 3:55 PM

Huge problem when combined with sea level rise

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 3:53 PM

APHG-U7

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Why Finnish babies sleep in boxes

Why Finnish babies sleep in boxes | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

"For 75 years, Finland's expectant mothers have been given a box by the state. It's like a starter kit of clothes, sheets and toys that can even be used as a bed. And some say it helped Finland achieve one of the world's lowest infant mortality rates."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 30, 12:58 PM

This is a fascinating article that can be a great case study to share with students to allow them to analyze the factors that can improve infant mortality rates.  In Finland the government provided oversight to improve infant mortality rates, pre-natal care and promote good parenting in a way that has had tangible results.  


Tags: Finland, medical, population,demographic transition model, unit 2 population.

Rebecca Renck's curator insight, July 30, 7:52 AM

The gratitude of the Finnish people is to be admired.  Here is a people that instead of accepting a gift from the government as an entitlement see it as a gift with all the excitement and appreciation that a new baby brings with it.  It makes my heart smile to think of how these boxes available to everyone, rich and poor, are received.  This is also a direct look at how family life and babies are being received with love.... lucky babies!

Gillian Campbell's curator insight, July 31, 3:04 AM

It's certainly an interesting one.....

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Local Population Pyramids

Local Population Pyramids | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

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Mrs. K's curator insight, August 27, 4:13 AM

1G Theme 2: 6 Billion people and me

CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 5:27 PM

Useful for explaining population pyramids.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, Today, 9:08 AM

Unit 2

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40 Maps That Explain The Middle East

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
These maps are crucial for understanding the region's history, its present, and some of the most important stories there today.

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Sharrock's curator insight, August 5, 5:30 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

Titles like the one for this article, 40 maps that explain the Middle East, are becoming increasingly common for internet articles.  They helps us feel that we can explain all of the world's complexities and make sense of highly dynamic situations.  While we can all agree that maps are great analytical tools that can be very persuasive, sometimes we can pretend that they are the end all, be all for any situation.  Maps can also be used to show how something that we thought was simple can be much complex and nuanced than we had previously imagined, as demonstrated by this article, 15 Maps that Don't Explain the Middle East at All.  Both perspectives have their place (and both articles are quite insightful). Not connected to the Middle East, but East Asia, this article entitled Lies, Damned Lies and Maps continues the discussion of maps, truth and perception.  

 

Tags: MiddleEast, conflict, political, borders, colonialism, devolution,historical, mapping

Linda Denty's curator insight, August 5, 3:42 PM

As Seth Dixson says, maps only tell a part of a story, but this may assist as part of an overall understanding of the history of the area.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, August 5, 5:10 PM

Some of the histories in maps is helpful in realising the complexities of the issues.

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Charting culture

"This animation distils hundreds of years of culture into just five minutes. A team of historians and scientists wanted to map cultural mobility, so they tracked the births and deaths of notable individuals like David, King of Israel, and Leonardo da Vinci, from 600 BC to the present day. Using them as a proxy for skills and ideas, their map reveals intellectual hotspots and tracks how empires rise and crumble. The information comes from Freebase, a Google-owned database of well-known people and places, and other catalogues of notable individuals. The team is based at the University of Texas at Dallas."


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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 7:47 AM

APHG-U3

wereldvak's curator insight, August 13, 7:00 AM

Geografische concepten als stedelijke ontwikkeling en diffusie patronen worden zichtbaar. Primate city en rank-size rule.....en demografische veranderingen in gebeiden.

Stewie Clock's curator insight, August 27, 6:25 PM

Hi it's one of your students try to guess who it is��

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Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World

Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

Elizabeth Borneman explores how cartography and cartographic projections help and hinder our perception of the world.

"How do you think the world (starting with our perceptions) could change if the map looked differently? What if Australia was on top and the hemispheres switched? By changing how we look at a map we truly can begin to explore and change our assumptions about the world we live in."

 

Geography doesn’t just teach us about the Earth; it provides ways for thinking about the Earth that shapes how we see the world.  Maps do the same; they represent a version of reality and that influences how we think about places. 

 

Tags: mapping, perspective.


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CHS AP Human Geography's curator insight, August 14, 2:30 PM

Use as small cards that students can sort in small groups?  Post as gallery walk?  Skill builder to identify areas of distortion (shape, area, distance, etc)?  

YEC Geo's curator insight, August 15, 7:03 AM

I love maps, but it's easy to forget that reproducing a three-dimensional object on a two-dimensional surface involves many trade-offs.  This article highlights those trade-offs.

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 6:28 AM

Would you perception of the world change if you saw it upside down?

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Global Multidimensional Poverty Index

Global Multidimensional Poverty Index | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

"The global Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI) is an international measure of acute poverty covering over 100 developing countries. It complements traditional income-based poverty measures by capturing the severe deprivations that each person faces at the same time with respect to education, health and living standards."


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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, July 21, 8:21 PM

Making sense of poverty.

 

Gina Panighetti's curator insight, August 4, 1:54 PM

"Access"--North America Unit

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 4:01 PM

APHG-U2 & U6

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This 19th Century Map Could Have Transformed the West

This 19th Century Map Could Have Transformed the West | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
Today's drought-riven west would look very different if Congress had listened to John Wesley Powell

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 11, 1:33 PM

Author of Mapping the Nation, Susan Schulten explains how western expansion failed to recognize the basic physical geographic reality of the United States--that the west is much drier than the east.  Given that much of the west, especially California, is in the midst of a severe drought, this article serves as a reminder to recognize that localized understandings of human and environmental actions are necessary.  Do you know what watershed you live in?  How does and should that impact us?   


Tags: physical, historical, California, water, environment.

Sylvain Rotillon's curator insight, July 1, 5:11 AM

We are very proud in France thinking we created the watershed approach with the 1964' water law, present basis for EU's water framework directive. Now, I would say that John W Powell is the true creator of watershed management. It's a blow to French pride...