Human Geography is Everything!
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Human Settlement Predictive Model

"Simulating climate conditions over the last 125,000 years and predicting how those changes would have allowed humans to spread around the globe, this video models human migration patterns." Read more: http://ow.ly/lWIp304qZEo


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 18, 3:14 PM

The World Economic Forum noted that some spatial research that was originally published in Nature, shows how geneticists took DNA samples from people of different cultures in different parts of the world to track their dispersal throughout the globe.  The video uses climatic data, combined with the genetic data, to create a model showing how the human race spread across the globe over a 125,000 year period.

 

Tagsdiffusiondemographicsmappingmigration, populationhistorical, video, visualization.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, May 18, 12:11 AM
Some interesting modelling based on climate change. I wonder what it would look like based on something different? Cultural differences? What came first culture or climate?
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 9:02 PM

The World Economic Forum noted that some spatial research that was originally published in Nature, shows how geneticists took DNA samples from people of different cultures in different parts of the world to track their dispersal throughout the globe.  The video uses climatic data, combined with the genetic data, to create a model showing how the human race spread across the globe over a 125,000 year period.

 

Tagsdiffusiondemographicsmappingmigration, populationhistorical, video, visualization.

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Understanding the Refugee Crisis in Europe, Syria, and around the World

"In which John Green discusses the Syrian refugee crisis and the growing number of refugees from Syria, Afghanistan, and Eritrea crossing the sea with the help of smugglers to seek refuge in European Union nations. Also discussed: The difference between migrants and refugees, the rights of refugees as established by international law, the globalization of all regional crises, and how the death of 3-year-old Alan Kurdi galvanized the world."  http://wp.me/P2dv5Z-1YS ;


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Nicaragua's Controversial Canal

The proposed Nicaragua Canal could be one of the largest engineering projects in history and promises to bring thousands of jobs to the impoverished country. But the government’s secretive deal with a Chinese-led firm has some Nicaraguans raising the alarm about displacement and environmental destruction in the canal’s path.

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Blake Joseph's curator insight, April 24, 2015 4:38 PM

The Chinese government is seriously considering plans to build a new canal through Nicaragua that will rival the United States' Panama canal. The size of the planned canal will be much larger than the Panama canal, allowing much bigger freighters and cargo vessels to be able to pass through it to and from the Chinese mainland. While many Nicaraguans are enthusiastic about the potential jobs and money involved in the project, others can see through this and sense great problems for the country if completed. The canal would destroy many environments within Nicaragua such as Lake Nicaragua and the forest that are located nearby, displacing many people who live and depend on the area for food and work. China is fast becoming a world superpower, and is alarmingly similar to the old Soviet Union as far as a lack of environmental protection and the welfare of citizens. I fear the future environmental impact this will have on Nicaragua could be devastatingly similar to the fatal impacts of other old Soviet failures like the Aral Sea or Chernobyl (without the radioactive isotopes, of course). I think many Nicaraguans do as well.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 1, 2015 2:13 AM


Chapter 5

Humans value, change and protect landscapes

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:12 AM

I'm fascinated by massive geo-engineering projects.  Usually, the proponents of the project will support it claiming that by reconfiguring the geographic settings it will lead to the economic growth of the country and strengthen their political situation.  Opponents cite that traditional land use patterns will get disrupted, the poor will be displaced, and the environment will be degraded. This canal is not so very different from many other geo-engineering projects in that respect.

 

Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, industry, economic, environment, political, resources, political ecology.

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Can India become a superpower?


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Paul Farias's curator insight, April 9, 2015 11:29 AM

If you were to ask me before watching this video, i would say absolutely. They have the capability because they are full of intelligent people, they also have enough people to do it. Something is just holding them back from moving forward...

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 15, 2015 3:15 PM

I really enjoyed this video; it's packed with a lot of information, but all of it is relevant to its main discussion of India as a potential superpower. In class, we discussed the importance of the Mississippi River Valley and the Great Lakes Basin played in the development of the US economy and the rise of the US as a global superpower, and this does not differ very much from the intricate river systems that litter the Indian subcontinent. The Ganges River Valley has historically been home to millions of people, facilitating agricultural development as well as trade. The lack of natural boundaries within the nation has allowed for the diffusion of the thousands of different cultures, customs, religions, and languages that find their home within India, although this has lead to division amongst its people. Internal disputes have paved the way for foreign leaders to seize control of the subcontinent, as evidenced by the Mughal Empire, and the eventual control of India by the British. Independence has lead to huge political and economic developments, as well as forming a distinct national identity that has, so far, risen above the petty sectionalist and race-related squabbles of yesteryear, but sectional rivalries continue to be had between the various Indian states. All the tools needed to become a superpower are at India's disposal; all it must do is seize the opportunity.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:48 AM

anyone who doesn't think that India can become a superpower is insane. they already are one. they have nukes. they have a billion people. they have massive industry, and they have a history of conflict with their neighbors.

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Imagining Continental Drift

"This animated documentary tells the story of polar explorer Alfred Wegener, the unlikely scientist behind continental drift theory."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 18, 2015 9:04 PM

While plate tectonics is now universally accepted, when Alfred Wegener first proposed continental drift it was it was greeted with a great deal of skepticism from the academic community.  This video nicely shows how scientific advancement requires exploration and imagination, and whole lot of heart.   


Tagstectonicsphysicalgeomorphology, K12STEM, video.

Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 20, 2015 12:47 AM

http://www.bharatemployment.com/

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Complex International Borders

More complex international borders in this follow up to part 1. 
In this video I look at even more enclaves and exclaves."


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Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 23, 2015 11:40 PM

After viewing this video, I found one common characteristic that ties together the countries involved in all of these border disputes: hunger for power. Although culture and sacred lands do cause border disputes, I believe the underlying purpose of claiming land for cultural reasons is to demonstrate power. Claiming lands for cultural purposes demonstrates that one's culture is superior to the other's culture, so naturally the more powerful culture gets to claim territory. On another note, I think it's interesting to see just how many enclaves and exclaves exist in the world. I did not know how many existed until I saw the video. I think this shows how insignificant these border anomalies are because these exclaves are usually just governed by the other country by which they are surrounded. 

Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 7, 2015 9:13 PM

Borders seem to be a problem whether you live in one continent or another, everyone wants power and control but not everyone can gain it. This video focuses and goes into depth about enclave and exclave borders, showing the irregularity of the borders in different areas that causes conflicts and problems. An example of a problem that the citizens have to deal with is that some villages can not leave due to the road blocks due to the borders. I can not imagine not being able to leave a certain area for all that time, I would go insane and I imagine those people are as well. International borders power has to be split somehow and not everyone can always come to an easy decision because parts of the land are claimed but the people do not have any control of it. Irregular borders cause more trouble than they are worth in my opinion. The final interesting fact about this video was that you learn that Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan are the two locations that have the most irregular border, these places must have the most conflict and problems. These borders are in places such as Germany, South Asia, China, Belgian, Sweden and Central Asia.

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 17, 2015 5:17 PM

A fascinating look into the complexity of borders. It is always important to keep in mind when looking at maps that the borders are neither permanent or defined as it exists in reality. Borders on world maps are rough estimations of what the borders actually are for they can't depict precise details on such a large scale. Furthermore regional/local maps sometimes do not whether as to conform to the border misconception unfortunately. In Central Asia as defined int he video the border were primarily a result of the Soviet Unions attempts to divided ethnic minorities reducing their power (primarily Stalin). As a result the countries after the collapse proceeded to claim the ethnic groups which created enclaves within each-other. As long as these groups are on peaceful terms this kind of thing isn't an issue. Unfortunately it does make the peoples lives in the enclaves slightly more difficult due to having to cross the border twice to see the rest of your country. This kind of thing was even done to the Jews in the first century AD who like the Russians wanted to eliminate or at least reduce attempts at revolution by the local populace. Hopefully Central Asia has or will make the lives of these enclaves easier.

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Feeding the Whole World

"Louise Fresco argues that a smart approach to large-scale, industrial farming and food production will feed our planet's incoming population of nine billion. Only foods like (the scorned) supermarket white bread, she says, will nourish on a global scale."


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dilaycock's curator insight, October 19, 2014 6:45 PM

Fresco argues that we tend to see "home-made" agriculture as a thing of beauty, whereas the reality is that many small scale farmers struggle and live a subsistence lifestyle. The adoration of small-scale farming, notes Fresco, is a luxury to those who can afford it. Large-scale production has increased the availability and affordability of food. Food production should be given as high a priority as climate change and sustainability, and we should seriously consider ways in which land can be used as a multi-purpose space that includes agriculture.

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, October 24, 2014 10:55 AM

Louise Fresco speaks of local food production and small scale control

and the entire food nework

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:43 PM

Many advocates of local foods favor a small-scale approach to farming and are opposed to large-scale agribusiness. It might be easy for those disconnected from the food production system (like me) to romanticize and mythologize the farmers of yesteryear and yearn to return to this past.  This talk highlights how essential large-scale farming is absolutely critical to feeding the global population; this other TED talk discusses many of the hunger problems especially the uneven access to food.  Here are some other pro-agribusiness resources.   

 

Tags: agriculture, food production, food distribution, agribusiness, TED

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Gender Empowerment and Education

"In this exclusive, unedited interview, 'I Am Malala' author Malala Yousafzai remembers the Taliban's rise to power in her Pakistani hometown and discusses her efforts to campaign for equal access to education for girls. Malala Yousafzai also offers suggestions for people looking to help out overseas and stresses the importance of education."


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analise moreno's curator insight, October 14, 2014 8:01 PM

This was one of our focuses last chapter. I totally agree with this because woman and as well as men deserve education they need education to have a successful life. I like how she describes this so well and thoroughly she talks about what she wants and needs in her life.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 4:10 PM

unit 3 or 6

Raychel Johnson's curator insight, May 25, 2015 8:42 PM

Summary: In this interview, Jon Stewart talks with Malala Yousafzai, a girl who outwardly fought for women's education, and in doing so, was shot by the Taliban. Even now, she continues to fight for women's equality and their right to education, after she won her Nobel Peace Prize. 

 

Insight: In this interview, the main topic is gender equality, and how it can lead to better education for women, which, in turn, gives women more power. Although developed countries, especially in Western Europe, already display high gender equality, more developing countries, especially in the Middle East, have hardly anything close to gender equality. Even with low amounts of gender equality, people like Malala and advocates in Western countries are striving towards this goal of gender equality.

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Teaching Kids about Global Poverty

Teaching Kids about Global Poverty | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"Living on One Dollar is a full-length documentary made by four college students who traveled to rural Guatemala to live on just a dollar a day. Upon their return, they created Living On One, a nonprofit to raise awareness and inspire action around global issues like hunger and poverty -- and started by publishing the Change Series of video shorts. I found it so compelling I've dedicated this whole film fest to it. Each episode not only succinctly frames an issue faced by people in the developing world and makes it personal, but also offers resource links to learn more -- and even better -- to do something about it."


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Character Minutes's curator insight, March 13, 2014 1:24 PM

Several character traits could be empasized using theses videos. The wheels in my mind are turning!

 

Marianne Naughton's curator insight, March 13, 2014 8:14 PM

Fundraiser event taught by kids

lyn chatfield's curator insight, March 17, 2014 11:49 PM

The links

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Missing Girls...

"In India, China and many other parts of the world today, girls are killed, aborted and abandoned simply because they are girls. The United Nations estimates as many as 200 million girls are missing in the world today because of this so-called 'gendercide' or femicide."


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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:10 PM

Females might be the underdogs of men forever. Hopefully this is not the case but it just seems like it will be sometimes, doesn't it? Women have had issues with rights and equality from the beginning of time. Things need to change on a global scale for horrible situations like this to stop occurring so frequently.

Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, December 2, 2014 9:52 PM

Unit 3 Cultural Processes and Patterns

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, December 15, 2014 3:45 PM

This femicide is extremely disappointing.  Genocide is expected in third world, war torn countries.  The fact that it's 2014 and female babies are murdered for being girls, and parents are scared for their  children's lives, show how much power the government has over the people's lives. It is sad to think the government has the power to dictate how many children families can have and what gender.  On the flip side, these are countries that are extremely overpopulated.  The one child policy in China is what China is currently using (along with this femicide) as population control.  This is an important issue because there needs to be some sort of population control, but to what extent? This is taking away someone's basic human right - to procreate. Parents do not have control over what gender they produce and if they produce a female, their child may be taken and murdered from them. The state takes away what you created, your offspring and there is nothing they can do about it. 

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APHUG Films Presents...

Promotional video for AP Human Geography enrollment

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 17, 2013 4:30 PM

This is video is a great tool to drum up interest in an AP Human Geography course produced by David Burton.  Similar videos and things designed to promote the discipline and it's study can be found under the tag, "geo-inspiration." 


Tags: APHG, geo-inspiration.

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, May 11, 2013 12:37 PM

I need to show this Day 1 of next school year

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Time to scrap “Eastern Europe”

Time to scrap “Eastern Europe” | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
Europe’s divisions are indeed grave. But counting the ex-communist countries as a single category is outdated and damaging 

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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 4:00 PM

Even though the Iron Curtain has long fallen, the practice of still describing the ex-Soviet countries as "Eastern Europe" still remains, and those same countries wish to change it. No longer are these countries part of the Soviet Block, and they feel that this characterization still defines them in this way. "Eastern Europe" denotes struggling economies, unhappy populations, marginalized lands, and an overall lack of development. While some countries are still recovering from Soviet rule, others have become important world powers with powerful economies. They no longer wish to be associated with Russia.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 7:58 PM

The old way of lumping all Countries east of Germany as simply "Eastern European" is not only wrong but can lead to negativity and conflict. These are nations which differ greatly in terms of language, ethnicity, and political affiliation should definitely not be lumped together within one identity. The fact is the Cold War has ended and instead of holding on to these out dated terms we should instead look forward and embrace these countries for what they are, unique countries with unique things to offer.

Kendra King's curator insight, February 15, 2015 7:37 PM

I don’t really see the big deal of the map categorization based on the author’s argument. I agree the Cold War labeling is “outdated,” but saying the grouping is “damaging” because people just think of those countries as “poor” is an incredibly weak argument. Anyone who wants to do business with the area will know who is fiscally sound and any country that believes this is an obstacle can easily show the notion false given the facts of the video in regards to wealth and EU membership. However, just because a country is in the EU doesn’t mean they are completely well off. Much of that area is still politically unstable, which is a whole economic value of its own. Furthermore, that wasn’t my connotation of those countries. When I think Cold War, I think of an area that is repressive and still under Russian influence. If anything, I think that is a bigger deal because Russia shouldn’t speak for a whole area.

 

I also don’t think many of the groupings really help the authors cause. If the author wants there to be less negative connotations related to the Cold War, then the area probably should make mentioned of “countries scared of Russia” as it was the major Cold War player. Nor should there be a mention of “free” economies, since the economic divide of each country played a major hand in the tension between each ideology.  So one really needs to be careful about the terms used when re-labeling an area.

 

I don’t see a huge push for renaming the area. We still live in an outdated cold war society given how the United States still looks at Russia. So I doubt, renaming will happen anytime soon. Guess the author will have to wait for the next big political crisis or war. 

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Making Sense of Maps

TED Talks Map designer Aris Venetikidis is fascinated by the maps we draw in our minds as we move around a city -- less like street maps, more like schematics or wiring diagrams, abstract images of relationships between places.

 

This video touches on numerous themes that are crucial to geographers including: 1) how our minds arrange spatial information, 2) how to best graphically represent spatial information in a useful manner for your audience and 3) how mapping a place can be the impetus for changing outdated systems. This is the story of how a cartographer working to improve a local transportation system map, which in turn, started city projects to improve the infrastructure and public utilities in Dublin, Ireland. This cartographer argues that the best map design for a transport system needs to conform to how on cognitive mental mapping works more so than geographic accuracy (like so many subway maps do).

 

Tags: transportation, urban, mapping, cartography, planning, TED, video, unit 7 cities.


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Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 14, 2012 3:42 PM
When trying to graphically represent spatial information in a useful manner for your particular audience, you will have a lot to take into consideration. How familiar are the travelers with the area you map out? Are there visuals to precisely mark on the map so that will they accurately correspond to the area?
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How the first city got started 12,000 years ago

"In this animated video, Jonathan F. P. Rose explains how the first city was started in Turkey, 12,000 years ago."


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Angel Peeples's curator insight, May 11, 2:41 PM
  This article is related to world cultural by being about urbanization. My opinion on this article is that I cant believe that it was that long ago the first city started. Turkey was the first place of the first city because it was were agriculture started. I think it is pretty cool it all started with a structure that people just started building around. 
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 19, 10:25 AM
unit 7
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 9:03 PM

What led to the first urban settlements? We know that the beginnings of agriculture are closely connected to the first forays into agriculture and the domestication of animals.  This brief video puts some archeological specificity on the though exercise, "what would you need to start the first city in a world without cities?" 

 

Tags: urban, placehistorical.

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The Individual and the Global

"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has." --Maragret Mead


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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 2015 3:55 PM

I love the notion and sometimes agree with this idea.  But at the same time it has to be sustained by the people.  It's this exciting idea to be a part of something, but that wears off quickly for a lot of people.  Then they are on to the next thing.  It would be nice if everyone would pick one cause and stay with it for atleast a year.  Maybe make this your New Years Resolution instead of hitting the gym.  

SNMinc WebGems's curator insight, May 8, 2015 5:16 AM

The unique power of one...

Avery Liardon's curator insight, May 20, 2015 10:43 AM

Very intriguing way to summarize the world and wrap up human geography. Reminds me of the pale blue dot speech, and really captures the big idea of how people and geography shape the world we live in.

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What is the future of the world's religions?

According to new Pew Research demographic projections, by 2050 there will be near parity between Muslims (2.8 billion, or 30% of the population) and Christians (2.9 billion, or 31%), possibly for the first time in history. Read more at http://pewrsr.ch/projections.

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Alan Frumkin's curator insight, April 7, 2015 7:11 PM

añada su visión ...

Zeke Robinson's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:06 PM

I think this is very true as the world is already shifting to Islam and losing at Christianity.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:22 PM

This video gives a hypothesis on how the religions are going to look like in 2015. The Pew Research believes Muslim is going to increase, Christianity is going to have a stable pojection, and people with no religion are going to decline.

 

This article relates with Unit 3: Cultural Patterns and Proccesses because it gives a hypothesis of how religions are going to look like in 2015. I was a little surprised about the guess that people with no religion are going to decrease in number. I would that it would increase because as people get busier with life and less time for traditions and holidays, then they will start to have no religion. 

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15 Countries In 4 Minutes (Time Lapse)

"During the past two years, Kien Lam went on the kind of trip most could only dream about. The photographer wanted to "see as much of the world as possible," so he visited 15 countries around the globe, from Mexico to New Zealand, snapping more than 10,000 photographs along the way. He edited his work together to make this stupendous time-lapse, which may be one of the most envy-inducing travel diaries I've ever seen."

 

Tags: landscape, time lapse, video.


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Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 28, 2015 1:00 AM
http://www.bharatemployment.com/
Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, March 8, 2015 11:09 AM

Magnifique

Eden Eaves's curator insight, March 23, 2015 11:56 PM

Unit 3

This time-lapse is one of the most amazing videos I've ever seen. Displaying the street-life in India, sand dunes in Arizona, the coast of Cozumel, coral reefs in Australia, mountains in Nepal, a castle in Scotland, Dubai's bright night lights, hobbit holes in the Shire and so many more amazing places captured in a few short seconds. It truly makes me feel like I traveled the world in 4.5 minutes.

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1940s Urbanism

"This is a film by the Chicago Board Of Education, produced sometime in the 1940s. This film could have been geared towards tourism or to entice companies to come to Chicago or used in the classroom.  The great thing about this film reel, is all the different views of the city they give."

 

Tags: Chicago, urban, place, landscape,  video, urbanism.


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Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 1, 2015 11:52 PM

www.bharatemployment.com

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, February 2, 2015 7:04 PM

I love Chicago!  Such a beautiful and clean city.

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The changing shape of world demographics

Animating the changing shape of the world population pyramid. For more multimedia content from The Economist visit our website: http://econ.st/1xqEZhX.


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Deanna Metz's curator insight, March 1, 2016 8:05 PM

This is an incredibly powerful and remarkably well-done video by the Economist (see related article here) that is reminiscent of a TED-ED lesson on the importance and value of population pyramids.  This video goes nicely with this article from the World Bank entitled "The End of the Population Pyramid" which highlights the demographic changes that will be reshaping global demographics in the next 50-100 years.  


Tag: population, declining population, demographic transition model, video, APHG.

Damon Recagno's curator insight, October 12, 11:52 AM

Here is a quick introduction to the shifting population demographics and why there is a Declining Natural Growth Rate.

 

This video is a good way of introducing the topic of Cities and Countries Methods for Tackling a Declining Natural Growth Rate because it provides insight on why many locations around the world are currently experiencing a declining natural growth rate.

Teresa Morante Arona's comment, October 13, 9:35 PM
Gret Video, but why do you think there is such a diverse shift in population demographics?
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Geographic Influences of Skating

"Dogtown and Z-Boys: A documentary about the pioneering 1970s Zephyr skating team."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 9, 2014 1:53 PM

Popular culture is shaped by taste-makers, counter-cultural movements, and the blending of cultural practices in new ways creating a distinct aesthetic. Often, the physical geography of a region plays a crucial role in shaping the cultural practices particular to their environment. All of that can be seen quite vividly in the colorful skating revolution of the 1970s that took shape in the Southern California. Kids who grew up idolizing surfers branched out their recreational habits into the modern form of skating that we see today at the X Games. Made legendary through a series of Skateboarder magazine articles, these kids shaped the cultural ethos of skateboarding for over a generation. With the coastal influence of surfing, the socioeconomics of a seaside slum, it’s abandoned piers, the ubiquity of cement and asphalt in the urban landscape, the run-down neighborhood of “Dogtown” was home to cultural movement. The fierce droughts of the 1970 meant abandoned swimming pools; that drought led surfers to the technological infrastructure for modern skating ramps and half pipes as they skated in emptied swimming pools. As stated in those Skaterboarder articles, “two hundred years of American technology has unwittingly created a massive cement playground of unlimited potential. But it was the minds of 11 year olds that could see that potential.” The documentary “Dogtown and Z-Boys” (trailer) and the fictionalized “Lords of Dogtown,” (trailer) both produced by skater turned filmmaker Stacy Peralta, chronicle the age (“Lords of Dogtown” is not appropriate for the K-12 classroom viewing).


Tags: place, spacesport, California, landscapevideo, popular culture, music.

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Population pyramids: Powerful predictors of the future

"Population statistics are like crystal balls -- when examined closely, they can help predict a country's future (and give important clues about the past). Kim Preshoff explains how using a visual tool called a population pyramid helps policymakers and social scientists make sense of the statistics, using three different countries' pyramids as examples."


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Nancy Watson's curator insight, September 26, 2014 4:04 PM

Population unit

Lauren Quincy's curator insight, March 20, 2015 1:51 PM

Unit 2: Population and Migration

 

This video was about how demographers categorize data and analyze it. This video showed a few different population pyramids in order to show differences in population in different countries. It showed China as an example and pointed out the remnants of the one child policy 35 years before and how the number of men were higher due to sex selective abortions. They also talked about how the population pyramids could show what stage in the demographic transition model a country was in and how they use them to predict future patterns and changes. 

 

This relates to unit 2 because it covers topics such as population change, demographic transition models, sex composition, population policies and much more. Population pyramids are very useful due to the visualization of sex, age and number composition in a countries population. They are very important in the use of predicting the future change in population because it can tell what the population has gone through in the past and what to expect in the DTM. 

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 2015 10:43 PM

This video illustrates how population pyramids have the ability to show how populations will rise and fall over time. Pyramids specifically show the population based on a specific age, and illustrates a country's amount of young people in comparison to the elderly. 

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Place-based Geography Videos

Place-based Geography Videos | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

Professor Seth Dixon shares over 50 of his favorite geography videos in this online map http://bit.ly/KDY6C2


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Matt Davidson's curator insight, October 23, 2014 7:54 PM

Great site - showing locational context is important for not just Geography but every subject. How can we understand the complexities of topics like conflict or urban economies or agricultural histories.... without understanding locations and maps?

Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 3, 2014 12:02 PM

It was nice to see where everything was happening. I hope it gets updated to more current events. I wish we had something like this when we were looking at the invasion of Kuwait.

Caroline Ivy's curator insight, March 15, 2015 5:19 PM

Seth Dixon uses ArgGIS to juxtapose maps with the location a video is associated with. 

 

This idea has crossed my mind before. Now, a video can be contemplated with the spatial accuracy needed. This connects events to a place, and can help students more fully grasp the geospatial distribution of events. 

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The Authoritative Map


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Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:26 PM

In the Winnie the Pooh Movie Pooh's Grand Adventure, the character Rabbit has absolute confidence in the printed word and especially the map.

 

Questions to ponder:  How much do we trust any given map?  How much should we trust a map (or the printed word)?  What makes a document reliable or unreliable? 

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, November 28, 2013 1:04 AM

The user is putting total trust in the map to get from A to B. How can we trust the map? What are the features of good infromation? A useful discussion-starter.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 3:38 AM

I think this video is a perfect example of todays modern soceity. Many people in this would today are exactly like rabbit, they believe everything they see without questioning its integrity. this has cause alot of problems in todays internet fueled world with anyone being able to post whatever they want and call it fact. This is where we need more people like Pooh who question everything. Pooh sees where he wants to go with his own eyes and can tell that rabbit is leading him the wrong way. This is relateable to so much in geography but to keep it simple ill compare it to Pythagoras proclaimed the earth was spherical. He question something everyone in the world took as a fact and nobody believed him because it was already stated that the world was flat. Just like pooh questioning the "offical map"

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Agriculture: Back to the Start

Coldplay's haunting classic 'The Scientist' is performed by country music legend Willie Nelson for the soundtrack of the short film entitled, "Back to the St...

 

Sure this is an animated commercial for Chipotle Grill, but this perfectly encapsulates the beliefs, values and ethics that underscore the organic farming movement. 


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Aurora Rider's curator insight, October 24, 2014 10:14 AM

Sure this is a Chipotle commercial but is does a good job at showing the belief that we should go back to the old way of farming. The video shows a family farm being taken over by what appears to be some big corporation. Upon being taken over, the animals are confined in small compartments and injected by what appears to be antibiotics and some other unknown substance. The factories they are sent to are polluting the place. The farmer sees all of this and decides to go back to the start.

jada_chace's curator insight, October 26, 2014 7:17 PM

In the video it shows how the world has evolved in the way that humans take action on Mother Nature’s ways. In the beginning, there was a small family farm that was growing crops and animals. Shortly after that, it showed how small family farms are being taken over by the big agribusinesses. In today’s society that tends to happen more and more, which can be both good and bad on our economy. Unless people don’t make a change about the way we treat our food, nothing in our economy is going to get better. 

Cassie Brannan's curator insight, December 9, 2014 10:21 PM

This animated film shows you what agriculture is really like. Sometimes it is difficult to be a farmer because of all of the climate changes. When the weather changes off and on, it can kill the crops, making it harder for farmers to find food. So as you can see, farmers go through a lot and it take a lot of hard work to be a successful farmer.

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East Asia's maritime disputes

East Asia's maritime disputes | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
A race for energy resources makes unresolved territorial disputes more dangerous in both North-East and South-East Asia

Tags: borders, political, conflict, water, China, Japan, East Asia.


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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:48 PM

I couldn't view this content. Its "cookies" were unable to read my computer.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 1:04 PM

Oil resources in the South China Sea are fueling territorial disputes over small islands and territorial waters. China, in order to claim these oil plays for itself, is claiming islands all over the sea. Extending its EEZ will ensure these oil plays. Many of these islands are no more than coral atolls, but China is arguing that they belong to it because of its measures to develop some of these islands. One resort islands and weather stations are being constructed in order to provide some sort of legitimate claim to these places. Also, by claiming these islands and expanding the EEZ, China is trying to claim other countries' EEZs as its own. While China is the powerhouse of the region, many fear that land grabs may turn into military action. 

 

As long as the world is reliant on fossil fuels, territorial disputes will continue and possibly grow in number. Dependency on a non-renewable resource will eventually lead to more regional and global arguments. 

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, April 12, 2015 3:26 PM

The dispute between The north and South of asia are evident. in a global perspective this territorial battle in somewhat may affect global development as far as trading with the United states. It will affect global interests, and this is why the senator kerry as i recall has made countless trips to help resolve the issues between the two North east and the South to come into an agreement to help because they dont want to loose energy resources and disturb the security that has been provided its a very tough situation.