Human Geography is Everything!
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Brexit: Reaction and the Aftermath

Brexit: Reaction and the Aftermath | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"The reactions to the Brexit have come in from all corners.  Since this was so shocking, newspapers articles that are insightful are using hyperbole in their titles to get our attention (Britain just killed globalization as we know it–Washington Post; Will Brexit mark the end of the age of globalization?–LA Times).  There have also been some excellent political cartoons and memes, so I wanted to archive a few of them here."  

 

Tags: Europe, supranationalism, globalization, economic, political, images.


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MsPerry's curator insight, June 29, 11:29 AM
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Catalonia independence: Parliament votes to start secession from Spain

Catalonia independence: Parliament votes to start secession from Spain | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
The Spanish region of Catalonia adopts a resolution supporting independence from Spain, but Spain's PM says his government will challenge it.


Tags: Catalonia, Spain, political, devolution, autonomy, Europe, culture.


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Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 7, 2015 11:45 AM

I've never heard of this country until recently when I came across a video on youtube about it. In my opinion, Catalonia has the right to secede from Spain because there are many ethnic group wanting their own dependence around the world and it doesn't feel like it's a part of another country. However, it all comes down to politics and Spain wants as much territory as it can get. Plus Catalonia is doing pretty for itself and the Spanish definitely want a part of that.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 1:25 PM

the Catalonia independence movement is just a small part of a large number of regions which were once autonomous and wish to be again. with so many of these areas in Europe the independence movements are finding hard to get support from other nations.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 1:29 AM

Challenging succession is a difficult task. First of all, there has to be a vote by the people and there has to be a strong driving force to get a positive outcome on the vote. The Prime Minister of Spain claims he will try to block it by filing a suit with the Constitutional Court. Succession of a country faces many hurdles especially if it does not have a strong vote to succeed and the opposition vote is strong.

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How Climate Change is Behind the Surge of Migrants to Europe

How Climate Change is Behind the Surge of Migrants to Europe | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"Even as Europe wrestles over how to absorb the migrant tide, experts warn that the flood is likely to get worse as climate change becomes a driving factor." http://wp.me/P2dv5Z-1YS ;


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 8, 2015 3:27 PM

This article from TIME and this excellent comic book-styled article both come to the conclusion that "drought, in addition to its mismanagement by the Assad regime, contributed to the displacement of two million in Syria."  Climate change can exacerbate political, culture and ethnic tensions as well add stress to already stressed systems.  This is a part of a the broader Syrian refugee issue.   


Tags: drought, Syriamigration, political, refugees, climate change.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 7, 2015 2:24 PM

The surge of migrants to Europe has another major contribution other than the Syrian War. Climate change cause food and water shortage to the region of middle-east. The intense droughts and flood are killing their agriculture ultimately lead them to find a food source somewhere else. It's like adding stress to more stress and now you have a massive problem that is showing no sign of stopping.

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What happened when Portugal decriminalized drugs?

"For 20 years The Economist has led calls for a rethink on drug prohibition. This film looks at new approaches to drugs policy, from Portugal to Colorado. 'Drugs: War or Store?' kicks off our new 'Global Compass' series, examining novel approaches to policy problems."

 

Tags: Portugal, Europe, political, popular culture, narcotics.


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Kevin Arboleda's curator insight, September 9, 2015 3:19 PM

It is crazy to think that Drugs such as Marijuana can create such a major market and a vast amount of money that can help out the economy. Governments should begin to control these certain drugs like Marijuana that are not as damaging as drugs like cocaine. They should then allow it to be sold to people, obviously with caution and restrictions. Colorado seems to be doing just perfectly fine.

Lon Woodbury's curator insight, September 9, 2015 9:15 PM

The other side of the war on drugs. -Lon

Penrith Farms's curator insight, September 11, 2015 1:21 PM

Very important insight

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Non-Native American Nations Control over North America

Non-Native American Nations Control over North America | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

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Alex Lewis's curator insight, April 6, 2015 10:00 AM

This animated photo shows the progression of the different nations in control of North America. The development of the U.S. is also depicted on here, as they went from mostly European control to independence. While the U.S. controlled most of what is now America, you can recognize the Civil War period by the control of Confederate States. 

 

                                        -A.L.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, April 8, 2015 1:33 PM

Wow. As a history major, I found this map timeline really interesting and really cool. It's a great example of how even though the physical geography of a place can remain the same, its political and economic geography can change so rapidly (or not so rapidly). It was especially interesting to see the brief stints that entities such as the Republic of the Rio Grande or the Confederate States of America did in the dividing up of North America over the last two and a half centuries. For someone who knows nothing about U.S. history, those blips on the radar beg the question, "what happened there?" How can a political entity encompass a geographic region and then disappear just as quickly?

 

And that ties into what I think this map is really about: colonialism. This map says a great deal about how European (or Western) empires carved up the New World and what some of their political or economic goals were in the times that the map shows. It's also important to note the title of the map: "Non-Native American Nations Control over North America". So as we see the map changing to show European or United States expansion, what we DON'T see is the gradual loss of land experienced by the various Native American tribes that inhabited the continent long before Europeans ever laid eyes on it. This map, therefore, highlights how political and economic geography can change so drastically when groups with a lot of economic, political, and military power are at odds with groups who are severely disadvantaged in these areas. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 17, 2015 9:00 AM

This map is an excellent resource in show the evolution of colonial claims to North America.. It is fascinating to watch all the political changes that have occurred on the continent in over the past 500 years. The biggest change is the evolutions of the United Sates from a small city state like nation to an empire on both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. This is also an extremely sad story to be told from this map. The loss and destruction of Native Americans is next to slavery is  the greatest sin of America. This map tells the complex story of our Continent.  

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The colourful propaganda of Xinjiang

The colourful propaganda of Xinjiang | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"China is in the midst of a crackdown on what it describes as 'terrorism driven by religious extremism'. The campaign is focused on the western province of Xinjiang, home to China's Uighur ethnic minority who are predominantly Muslim."


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Kendra King's curator insight, April 3, 2015 7:37 PM

This art seems like a logical extension of the government’s use of power although I personally don’t agree with their abuse of power. In China the government will uses its authority to monitor the personal activities of its citizens as demonstrated by the pictures dictating what people should and shouldn’t wear. When the citizens don’t follow through with China’s rule, violence typically happens. In fact, a fair deal of the paintings showed violence (i.e. the tank running people over). I actually find those depictions more offensive and disturbing than any of the other pictures because the end result is clearly that of dath rather than disapproval. Now, I understand that some places need to be ruled with an iron fist (i.e. Iraq), however I don’t really see how threatening people with more violence solves the issue of extremism. If anything, doesn’t this just give the extremist more of a reason to dislike the government? As such, is the government just creating more resentment that will lead to demonstrations in the future? I say this because eventually when a local population is subject to such horrible treatment, there isn't much else to lose and very little reason no to fight back. 

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 16, 2015 9:20 PM

This article has great insight on the way government influences popular belief. We have seen these many times in American society also when government was afraid of communism during the cold war for instance. Often we have prejudgements or beliefs and we are not sure where they even stem from. Pushed Propaganda can be very influential over the mass population, in instilling certain beliefs.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:45 PM
The point the Chinese are trying to make is that the Muslim people are bad, they do unacceptable things and it needs to be taken care of. They are making it hard for a couple to get married and if they do it is with special permission. They even banned anyone under the age of 18 to enter a mosque. Praying in Xinjiang is highly regulated and comes with strict rules and consequences. In all their propaganda you can see how they represent getting rid of the muslims because they are wearing black. If you ask me, it seems like the government is doing this because they are afraid of being taken over and losing the area, just like we used to use propaganda in the wars.
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HarperCollins omits Israel from maps for Mideast schools, citing ‘local preferences’

HarperCollins omits Israel from maps for Mideast schools, citing ‘local preferences’ | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"For months, publishing giant HarperCollins has been selling an atlas it says was developed specifically for schools in the Middle East. It trumpets the work as providing students an 'in-depth coverage of the region and its issues.  Its stated goals include helping kids understand the 'relationship between the social and physical environment, the region’s challenges [and] its socio-economic development.' Nice goals. But there’s one problem: Israel is missing."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 6, 2015 9:41 AM

In other words, Israel got eliminated from this atlas that was designed to cater to Middle Eastern countries that take umbrage with the fact that Israel...exists.  Making maps always has political overtones and the company is now realizing that you can't please everyone with different versions for distinct audiences.  Now, HarperCollins has pulled the book and will pulp all remaining versions of the atlas.  


Tags: Israel, social media, political, mapping, cartography.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, January 23, 2015 12:11 PM

unit 1!

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Fragile States Index

Fragile States Index | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"Weak and failing states pose a challenge to the international community. In today’s world, with its highly globalized economy, information systems and interlaced security, pressures on one fragile state can have serious repercussions not only for that state and its people, but also for its neighbors and other states halfway across the globe.  The Fragile States Index (FSI), produced by The Fund for Peace, is a critical tool in highlighting not only the normal pressures that all states experience, but also in identifying when those pressures are pushing a state towards the brink of failure."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 27, 2014 3:31 PM

How can political stability and security be measured?  What constitutes effective governance?  The Fragile States Index (formerly known as the Failed States Index) is a statistical ranking designed to measure the effective political institutions across the globe.  There are  12 social, economic, and political/military categories that are a part of the overall rankings and various indicators are parts of the metrics that are a part of this index are:

SOCIAL

•Demographic Pressures 

•Refugees/IDPs

•Group Grievance

•Human Flight and Brain Drain

ECONOMIC

•Uneven Economic Development

•Poverty and Economic Decline

POLITICAL/MILITARY

•State Legitimacy

•Human Rights and Rule of Law

•Public Services

•Security Apparatus

•Factionalized Elites

•External Intervention


Tags: political, statisticsdevelopment, territoriality, sovereignty, conflict, political, devolution, war.

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, August 28, 2014 12:57 AM

How can political stability and security be measured? The Fragile States Index is a statistical ranking designed to measure the effective political institutions across the globe.

MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 2014 9:49 AM

APHG-Unit 4

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Donut Holes in Law of the Sea

Donut Holes in Law of the Sea | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"Sovereignty over land defines nation states since 1648. In contrast, sovereign right over the sea was formalised only in 1982. While land borders are well-known, sea borders escape the limelight."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 8, 2014 9:28 PM

These maritime borders mark the economic area is defined by its Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), a 200-nautical mile-wide (370 km) strip of sea along the country’s national coast line.  This regulation, which was installed by the ‘UN Convention on the Law of the Sea’ in 1982, grants a state special rights to exploit natural (such as oil) and marine (for instance fish) resources, including scientific research and energy production (wind-parks, for example).  This interactive map of the EEZs also shows the 'donut holes,' or the seas that are no state can claim that no state can claim.  Given the number of conflicts that are occurring--especially in East Asia--this map becomes a very valuable online resource for teaching political geography. 


Questions to ponder: how does this series of buffer zones around the Earth's land masses impact politics, the environment and local economies?  Where might the EEZs be more important to the success of a country/territory than other regions? 


Tagseconomic, environment, political, resources, water, sovereignty, coastal, environment depend, territoriality, states, conflict, unit 4 political.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 29, 2014 5:48 PM

Option topic Marine  Environments and management

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:52 PM

APHG-U4

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Where Do Borders Need to Be Redrawn? - Room for Debate

Where Do Borders Need to Be Redrawn? - Room for Debate | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
What parts of the world should rethink their maps? Why and how?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 7, 2014 11:28 AM

Maps are always changing as a new nation gets added and old lines cease to make sense. Territory is claimed and reclaimed.  This series of seven articles in the New York Times explores regional examples of how borders impacts places from a variety of scholarly perspectives.  Together, these article challenge student to reconsider the world map and to conceptualize conflicts within a spatial context.

 

Tags: bordersmapping, political, territoriality, sovereignty.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, July 16, 2014 10:53 AM

WOW, some really interesting thoughtdebate points here! very very unit 4

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:05 PM

APHG-U4

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China's territorial claims

One of the geography videos embedded in this interactive map: http://bit.ly/KDY6C2


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John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:24 PM

China is imposing these territorial claims as it is a benefit for their economy. That being said this can cause geo-political tensions that can have detrimental effects on how one country trades with another. 

WILBERT DE JESUS's curator insight, April 27, 2015 12:09 PM

China is currently creating islands in the south china sea to be able to claim the 200 nautic miles around those islands as their EEZ, a chapter of cheeting in its claims over control of the south china sea.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 6, 2015 3:08 PM

China's rise to prosperity over the last couple of decades is not solely  alarming for far-reaching regions of the world but also its neighbors.  This video highlights that with its coverage of the land-disputes between China and its Eastern and Southeastern Asian neighbors.  It's only common sense to realize that once a nation becomes a world power it will seek to grow even more powerful.  couple that with the fact that a small nation will inevitably feel self-conscious compared to its huge neighbor you get the phenomenon that is covered in this video.

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Quebec Voters Say 'Non' to Separatists

Quebec Voters Say 'Non' to Separatists | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"Quebec voters gave a resounding no to the prospects of holding a third referendum on independence from Canada, handing the main separatist party in the French-speaking province one of its worst electoral defeats ever."  

 

Quebec, which is 80 percent French-speaking, has plenty of autonomy already. The province of 8.1 million sets its own income tax, has its own immigration policy favoring French speakers, and has legislation prioritizing French over English.  But many Quebecois have long dreamed of an independent Quebec, as they at times haven't felt respected and have worried about the survival of their language in English-speaking North America.

 

Tags: Canada, political, devolution.


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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:32 PM

The politics of Quebec are interesting to say the least. Originally founded by the French in the 17th century and then later conquered by the English in the late 18th century Canada is a nation with a mix if influences. While much of Canada today is something of a standard English colony Quebec has desperately hung on to it's French roots. In Quebec City their are laws ensuring that all store signs are in French, even making sure the font is large enough. In spite of their dogged interest in preserving their culture they've voted against spiting from the body of Canada repeatedly. This is largely because even the more die hard French Canadians know their small territory is unable to economically survive on its own.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, January 29, 2015 2:57 PM

This article is interesting to me, due to the fact that part of my family is French Canadian.  I have always found it interesting how the Quebecois have tried to become their own country but could never quite pull it off.  In fact, I had a teacher in high school who was from the Canadian Mid-West and disliked French Canadians, however he said that although the French community is different from the rest of Canada, he believed that separation was not going to happen.  This article shows that the Parti Quebecois will, for the time being, have to regroup and "clean the salt from their wounds" from this defeat.  For now, it appears Quebec is not going anywhere.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 17, 2015 8:39 AM

This is quite a turnaround from the vote that you showed us in class from the mid 90s. The younger generations that have come of ages sense the previous vote are most likely non separatists. Overall I think this just about ends the talk of an independent Quebec. The nation of Canada is best when unified, as is every other state on the globe. This result, along with the results of the proposed Scottish separation seem to indicate that the wave of separation is dying out. Though I honestly think that theses movements never had much of a chance anyway.

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Military industrial complex: These 15 countries have the largest defense budgets

Military industrial complex: These 15 countries have the largest defense budgets | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
World defense spending is expected to go up for the first time in five years, thanks to China and Russia.

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 18, 2014 1:32 PM

Russia is the third highest goverment military that spends around 143 million people lived in Russia in 2012 and they spent around $475 per person on it's military. Russia compared to China and the US is another story the US is number one in who spent the most on their military forces at $600.4 billion. As far as China is concerened it comes in at number two at spending around  $112.2 billion. These numbers make sense especially for the power house that China is and how their values of militarism affect their spending and their way of society/life.

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, March 7, 2015 10:00 PM

Wow looking at all these defense military budgets show why some economies are not producing well, but at the same time its astonishing how much money is spent protecting homelands. It will grow in the next 5 years, and hopefully i'll be around to see what has changed who has taken the top position because i feel as if their will be a shift in the tides.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 9, 2015 6:10 PM

Not surprised at many names on the list, but am surprised at The US figure, how much it costs per American, and at the gap between The US and China.  Its scary to see some of the names on the list though and wonder if they are using that money for defense, or an offensive attack.

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More Mexicans leave than enter USA in historic shift

More Mexicans leave than enter USA in historic shift | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
After four decades of mass migration to the U.S., more Mexicans are now returning home.

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Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 9:44 PM

With less jobs now in the u.s. and the economic growth in Mexico this is a good reason for Mexicans to head back home. What people do not realize at least I did not is the fact that there is a lot of entrepreneurship on the streets of Mexico. Since 2000 the changes that have occurred in Mexico is economy, education, politics and lower birth rates. 

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, December 2, 2015 12:17 PM

The first thing I thought while I was reading this was "I wonder if Donald Trump, and his flock of moron followers have seen these statistics?" I mean, never let the truth get in the way of a good hate speech right?! But as I continued reading I couldn't help but worry about the effect this could have on the American economy. The truth is that illegal's do the work we aren't willing to do. Do you know any American kids who want to work in the fields of Alabama picking watermelon's for $5 an hour? Hell, do you know any American kids who want to work, period? Do I actually think a watermelon is worth $13?

John Puchein's curator insight, December 4, 2015 6:51 AM

Due to a Mexican economy rebounding and a slow down in the American economy making it harder to find jobs, we are seeing a change in Mexican immigration patterns. While this has been suspected for years, Pew research finalized a study. 

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Canada's secret plan to invade the U.S. (and vice versa)

Canada's secret plan to invade the U.S. (and vice versa) | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
After World War I, Canada drew up classified plans to invade the U.S. Meanwhile, the U.S. had its own secret plot to create the "United States of North America."

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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 17, 2015 9:36 AM

hoax?

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, September 18, 2015 11:30 PM

adicionar sua visão ...

Alex Vielman's curator insight, September 20, 2015 10:25 PM

It's very interesting to see how neighbor countries don't really get along as to how one thinks they would. Who would of thought Canada actually had plans to invade the U.S.? Isn't it a good thing to have your allies like best friends? Canada had this plan during the 1920s and had 5 intrusion entries. its interesting to see how one of the intrusion points would of been Seattle. In my opinion, this could of been a really bad for both countries. Overall, now I would like to know how 'well' the relationship is between the two countries. 

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Understanding the Refugee Crisis in Europe, Syria, and around the World

"In which John Green discusses the Syrian refugee crisis and the growing number of refugees from Syria, Afghanistan, and Eritrea crossing the sea with the help of smugglers to seek refuge in European Union nations. Also discussed: The difference between migrants and refugees, the rights of refugees as established by international law, the globalization of all regional crises, and how the death of 3-year-old Alan Kurdi galvanized the world."  http://wp.me/P2dv5Z-1YS ;


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Nicaragua's Controversial Canal

The proposed Nicaragua Canal could be one of the largest engineering projects in history and promises to bring thousands of jobs to the impoverished country. But the government’s secretive deal with a Chinese-led firm has some Nicaraguans raising the alarm about displacement and environmental destruction in the canal’s path.

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Blake Joseph's curator insight, April 24, 2015 4:38 PM

The Chinese government is seriously considering plans to build a new canal through Nicaragua that will rival the United States' Panama canal. The size of the planned canal will be much larger than the Panama canal, allowing much bigger freighters and cargo vessels to be able to pass through it to and from the Chinese mainland. While many Nicaraguans are enthusiastic about the potential jobs and money involved in the project, others can see through this and sense great problems for the country if completed. The canal would destroy many environments within Nicaragua such as Lake Nicaragua and the forest that are located nearby, displacing many people who live and depend on the area for food and work. China is fast becoming a world superpower, and is alarmingly similar to the old Soviet Union as far as a lack of environmental protection and the welfare of citizens. I fear the future environmental impact this will have on Nicaragua could be devastatingly similar to the fatal impacts of other old Soviet failures like the Aral Sea or Chernobyl (without the radioactive isotopes, of course). I think many Nicaraguans do as well.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 1, 2015 2:13 AM


Chapter 5

Humans value, change and protect landscapes

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:12 AM

I'm fascinated by massive geo-engineering projects.  Usually, the proponents of the project will support it claiming that by reconfiguring the geographic settings it will lead to the economic growth of the country and strengthen their political situation.  Opponents cite that traditional land use patterns will get disrupted, the poor will be displaced, and the environment will be degraded. This canal is not so very different from many other geo-engineering projects in that respect.

 

Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, industry, economic, environment, political, resources, political ecology.

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These Amazing Maps Show the True Diversity of Africa

These Amazing Maps Show the True Diversity of Africa | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"African countries are also quite diverse from an ethnic standpoint. As the Washington Post's Max Fisher noted back in 2013, the world's 20 most ethnically diverse countries are all African, partially because European colonial powers divvied up sections of the continent with little regard for how the residents would have organized the land themselves. This map above shows Africa's ethnographic regions as identified by George Murdock in his 1959 ethnography of the continent."

 

Tags: Africa, colonialism, borders, political, language, ethnicity.


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Chris Costa's curator insight, October 27, 2015 4:51 PM

We have seen the repercussions of ethnic tensions play out in the Balkans, the Middle East, and even in the United States, and Africa is no exception. Arbitrarily drawn national borders- the remnants of European colonialism- means that there is often significant ethnic diversity within many African nations. Although this creates interesting blends of language and culture, it has often bred violence in many countries, perhaps most notably in South Africa and Rwanda. Although many members of the West like to lump the entire continent into a single category, this could not be further from the truth. The second largest continent with extreme biodiversity, it has bred thousands of languages and hundreds of different cultural backgrounds, sometimes within a single country. It is important for the West to understand the complex make-up of the African continent in order to avoid the Eurocentric assumptions many Westerners make when discussing the continent. There isn't a single "Africa"- there isn't even a single "Nigeria," but rather a multitude of different peoples and cultures, equally as complex as those found in other regions of the world. This map does a very good job at illustrating the complexity and richness of the continent.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 30, 2015 7:20 AM

People often underestimate how diverse Africa really is. We often have the tendency to lump all Africans together in one large ethnic group. The actual number of different ethnic groups in Africa is rather staggering. This map can also be used as a partial explanation for the amount of ethnic conflict in Africa. Often times, these ethnic groups are squashed together in states with poorly drawn borders. Under that situation, ethnic conflict becomes inevitable.

Patty B's curator insight, February 11, 4:52 PM

This map of Africa not only shows the true diversity of the African continent, but it represents the diversity that truly exists everywhere on a global scale. In many ways, people are the same everywhere you go. But people are also vastly different in a multitude of ways. In a highly globalized society it has become easy to focus on the similarities between the people of different countries, but the fact of the matter is that no matter how far reaching a corporation’s influence is, we are always talking about and dealing the individual lives. Towns, cities, states, countries, continents are all comprised of individuals and our society today makes it difficult to remember that by focusing on group statistics and other forms of impersonal data (not to say those tools are useless, there just needs to be a balance between the tools used). Each person that falls within any group being examined or categorized is vastly unique in a variety of other ways and I think this map brings that notion to light. As someone born in the U.S., I would never think of Africa as such a diverse place. Not even close as a matter of fact. It really is easy to examine Africa as a country instead of a continent. I think that goes for many continents, including Europe. We often think of the U.S. as being the melting pot and the most diverse place, but the article points to the fact that 20 of the world’s most diverse countries happen to be in Africa. 

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Complex International Borders

More complex international borders in this follow up to part 1. 
In this video I look at even more enclaves and exclaves."


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Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 23, 2015 11:40 PM

After viewing this video, I found one common characteristic that ties together the countries involved in all of these border disputes: hunger for power. Although culture and sacred lands do cause border disputes, I believe the underlying purpose of claiming land for cultural reasons is to demonstrate power. Claiming lands for cultural purposes demonstrates that one's culture is superior to the other's culture, so naturally the more powerful culture gets to claim territory. On another note, I think it's interesting to see just how many enclaves and exclaves exist in the world. I did not know how many existed until I saw the video. I think this shows how insignificant these border anomalies are because these exclaves are usually just governed by the other country by which they are surrounded. 

Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 7, 2015 9:13 PM

Borders seem to be a problem whether you live in one continent or another, everyone wants power and control but not everyone can gain it. This video focuses and goes into depth about enclave and exclave borders, showing the irregularity of the borders in different areas that causes conflicts and problems. An example of a problem that the citizens have to deal with is that some villages can not leave due to the road blocks due to the borders. I can not imagine not being able to leave a certain area for all that time, I would go insane and I imagine those people are as well. International borders power has to be split somehow and not everyone can always come to an easy decision because parts of the land are claimed but the people do not have any control of it. Irregular borders cause more trouble than they are worth in my opinion. The final interesting fact about this video was that you learn that Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan are the two locations that have the most irregular border, these places must have the most conflict and problems. These borders are in places such as Germany, South Asia, China, Belgian, Sweden and Central Asia.

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 17, 2015 5:17 PM

A fascinating look into the complexity of borders. It is always important to keep in mind when looking at maps that the borders are neither permanent or defined as it exists in reality. Borders on world maps are rough estimations of what the borders actually are for they can't depict precise details on such a large scale. Furthermore regional/local maps sometimes do not whether as to conform to the border misconception unfortunately. In Central Asia as defined int he video the border were primarily a result of the Soviet Unions attempts to divided ethnic minorities reducing their power (primarily Stalin). As a result the countries after the collapse proceeded to claim the ethnic groups which created enclaves within each-other. As long as these groups are on peaceful terms this kind of thing isn't an issue. Unfortunately it does make the peoples lives in the enclaves slightly more difficult due to having to cross the border twice to see the rest of your country. This kind of thing was even done to the Jews in the first century AD who like the Russians wanted to eliminate or at least reduce attempts at revolution by the local populace. Hopefully Central Asia has or will make the lives of these enclaves easier.

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How Google represents disputed borders between countries

How Google represents disputed borders between countries | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
INTERNATIONAL borders are often tricky to chart on maps. Tangible topographic features can be pinned down by satellite imagery but the boundaries between many states...

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Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 2014 9:10 AM

How does politics affect map-making? 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 8, 2014 12:36 PM

unit 4

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 13, 2014 3:17 PM

Google is always a step ahead of any other online page so it is not surprising that Google have some countries in dispute because they can see people can see the political status of a country in Google map but that might change the way we see and think about Google and countries with dispute. Google or the Internet will always be a good help for people to be able see what is happening between country's borders.

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40 Maps That Explain The Middle East

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
These maps are crucial for understanding the region's history, its present, and some of the most important stories there today.

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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, March 15, 2015 8:47 PM

It is interesting to see the same trends over and over again.  These maps are a great tool to show the history of the area, as well as the history of religion and political views.  I appreciate the information provided since the Middle East has undergone the most transitions (going all the way back to Mesopotamia) and its history can be confusing. 

Alex Vielman's curator insight, November 23, 2015 3:17 PM

Maps like the ones posted in this article, really helps people to understand and break down deeply of understanding the entire region as a whole. Visualization is very important in geography when trying to understand the region people are talking about. this region as goes down to the Mesopotamia Era. It is important to know, how the culture was in this area to how it differentiated during the Ottoman Empire. During the first couple of maps, we can begin to see the division of the entire region. As you go on, we begin to notice the divisions between people, religion, language between states and in-states. There is so much information to know about the Middle East region and it may be even harder to understand due to the tons of changes and separations, but it is important to understand these divisions like the Sunni's and the Shi'ites in order to fully explain the development and the current situations that are occurring in this region as we speak. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 7, 2015 5:18 PM

These 40 maps are a very interesting way of showing how people have traveled around and moved about the Earth from the time of the fertile crescent era to the people of today. It shows us the paths that people have taken to move to a new location. How they used the Meditteranean Sea to move from one side to the other. It also shows how the Tigris and Euphrates came together to form a smaller area of the Persian gulf. This led to smalled economic growth because now there is less land for imports and exports.

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What is a part of the United States?


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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:54 PM

APHG-U4

CHS AP Human Geography / Beth Gehle & Amy Rossello's curator insight, August 17, 2014 5:28 PM

Use in Political Geo unit, or for Canada and US region

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 12, 2015 11:09 PM

I honestly feel like we are never taught about these areas ever in US schools. We are always drilled about the 50 states and that's it. I would be interested in learning the history behind why this is still the case and what is keeping our government from considering them part of the states. The fact that they wont even consider American Samoa's citizens is a disgrace.

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China publishes new map

China publishes new map | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
China has published a new map of the entire country including the islands in the South China Sea (West Philippine Sea) in order to "better show" its territorial claim over the region.

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Jason Schneider's curator insight, April 2, 2015 9:44 PM

Not only does China have a strong economic system and the high population in the world, but they also claim South China Sea. Also since they are wealthy, then they hire maritime security to make sure other areas such as the Philippines and Malaysia don't attempt to take over China's seas. Also, the Philippines attempts to battle China over oil and natural gases but they fail against China because China's more populated than the Philippines. The main point of this map is to show how much of the ocean and sea China claims and they claim about 18% of water out of their land population.

David Lizotte's curator insight, April 23, 2015 1:09 PM

This map exemplifies how different countries have differing impressions of land/territory that they own. China views itself as this image depicted above. They honestly believe it. As ridiculous as it sounds I do understand why. China owns this region of the world and will continue to do so. They are claiming land and even forming new land throughout the South China Sea. What is important about the creating of land mass is that China then controls 200 nautical miles around whatever they construct. There is nothing the neighboring countries in the region can do about it. China knows it is a dominant military power and intimidates other countries.

For example, the island of Taiwan is claimed by China as a province. China does not recognize the "Republic of China" (ROC) which governs Taiwan and used to govern mainland China prior to the Chinese Civil War. China has even threatened the island with military use if the people openly declare a massive independent movement. There is a lot more to this history, more than a scoop can provide for, however in a nutshell, Taiwan is China's and will continue to be so. 

In another region of China bordering India and Pakistan, which conveys the expansive territory China covers as a country and its various neighboring countries, China is yet claiming another piece of land. As if the dispute between India and Pakistan was not great enough the two countries also differ over territory just north of the Kashmir border region. China also believes this territory is theirs, now making the land up for grabs between the three nations. China may or may not have historical ties that link it to this piece of land. But in either case it certainly views this territory as an area of land that is open for taking, in that it could eventually claim the territory as a whole. What would Pakistan and India do? These two countries have enough going on. 

Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:55 AM

At first when looking at this map, it seems just about right knowing that China is a huge territorial country, but we also see that this map, when compared to an older map, is different. In this map, we can see that the islands on the West, China has claimer part of there territory. This is simply an analysis of how China seeks geopolitical power over these islands. The map shows China’s claim over the South China Sea by marking ten dash lines around the region just off the coasts of Vietnam, Malaysia, Brunei, and the Philippines’ islands of Palawan and Luzon. These are all individual countries, that have there own culture, language, separate of that of China. The difference between this issue and perhaps that of Catalonia seeking independence over Spain, is that these countries like Malaysia and Brunei are already territorial countries. China is simply showing that they have the power to declare this map, even if its not true. 




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African borders

African borders | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"About the history of the creation of Africa borders and debates about African borders."


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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:50 PM

APHG-U4

David Lizotte's curator insight, April 14, 2015 9:45 PM

In all honesty, the history of Africa intrigues me. I've always tried to expand my knowledge on the subject as well as stay current with its modern affairs (as best as possible). I have had the pleasure of studying abroad in South Africa for a semester as well as taking courses focusing on the vast continent throughout my career as a RIC student. 

Ancient Africa is a topic I know more about than the average person. It's slavery and the effects it had on the realm, followed by Colonialism/Post Colonialism that I like to take pride in knowing best. I've taken different courses focusing on the matter and have done my fair share of research for pleasure. However, I still have a lot more research to do because I have so many thoughts, questions, and comments  (before making a comment on a particular subject I like to research it in depth) to make. 

I have the desire to pursue an education focusing on "Africa" and its colonial aspects. I feel like I would pursue a solid topic of high interest-perhaps even importance- to me and research the dickens out of it. I would prefer it to be an original piece though. Not a blunt history of colonial rule in Africa, whether it be specific or broad. I do not want to reiterate what others have already side. I want to create my own theories on Africa. 

Currently I am quite interested in "Post-Colonial" Africa and the fact that I find this term to be exotic, foreign, and even a facade. There are colonial aspects of Africa that have existed for decades and will continue to do so as long as Western and Eastern (China) "business" is "functioning." "Business" is broad yet it is being used here to describe the basic global economy, producers and consumers thus a subsequent supply and demand. Now, what does the term "functioning" mean? Well, to simply put it, business functions through Africa's exponential amount of natural resources, cheap labor, and corrupt officials. Most of the civilized world benefits from Africa's numerable resources yet the vast majority of African's themselves do not enjoy such pleasures. This is a trend that has existed since the Portuguese appraised the Western Coast of the continent in the early fifteenth century. 

I understand that this basic premise may not be the first of its kind, in general. However, there are specific situations/conflicts that can be researched further towards developing a more unique body of work. If I do pursue a higher education in this area I plan on succeeding in producing a sound body of work that I am proud to put my name on. It would be neat to teach the significance of the three maps displayed in this scoop.it article. 

Emily Coats's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:20 AM

UNIT 4 POLITICAL 

This article shows many maps depicting the history and creation of African borders, as well as the impact of colonialism on Africa. This shows where different groups resided, and how borders were not properly made to fit one single nation, but mixed together many nations in one region.These maps are extremely useful when trying to learn more about Africa and its history, specifically its boundaries. 

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Gastrodiplomacy: Cooking Up A Tasty Lesson On War And Peace

Gastrodiplomacy: Cooking Up A Tasty Lesson On War And Peace | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
An international relations scholar is using her students' love of food to teach them about global conflicts. It's a form of winning hearts and minds that's gaining traction among world governments.

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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, March 25, 2014 3:37 PM

The way to world peace may be through our stomachs. Great idea!

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, March 25, 2014 3:38 PM

The way to world peace may be through our hearts and stomachs. Great idea!

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, March 30, 2014 7:58 PM

Vínculos Poderosos! Pilares da Geografia Vivida.