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The Mystery House

"In Raleigh, N.C., there's a house... or what looks like a house. What's hidden inside is more important than most people realize. Read the story: http://wunc.org/post/video-whats-inside-house-wade-avenue "


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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, January 25, 10:06 AM

A great introduction to city planning

 

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/01/17/263476645/whats-inside-this-mystery-house-in-north-carolina

 

 

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, January 27, 4:11 PM

This short YouTube clip focuses on the Governments creative ways of keeping city planning out of the eyes of everyday people. Not only do these creative ways allow cities to remain unvandalised, but they also eliminate the eye sores of waterplants and towers. I think these ideas are great and allow communities to remain beautiful and inviting. 

Tracy Galvin's comment, January 30, 3:00 PM
This is a really nice example of a respect for the neighborhood. By disguising the building it doesn't create an eyesore in the community but will allow the plant to provide a service to the neighbors. This keeps property values high and the neighbors happy.
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Urban Exploration

Urban Exploration | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

"The French have a wonderful word—flâneur—for someone who seeks to explore and understand the nature of a city’s landscape, usually by taking spontaneous adventures amidst the ebb and flow of life going on around them. In this week’s theme we invite you to lose yourself reading about the flâneur-esque adventures of Maptia’s streetwise connoisseurs and explore a myriad of cities through their eyes."


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Linda Alexander's curator insight, December 1, 2013 11:04 AM

A wonderful site that currently explores 21 global cities.  If you've ever traveled to India (any major city within it), Mexico City, Rome, or any another travel destination where the human street population is somewhat off the charts, you'll enjoy these blog posts.  Meanwhile, I am thinking about entering a post of my own!  This is a perfect site to share with students prior to journal writing or school trips abroad. 

Helen Rowling's curator insight, December 1, 2013 8:18 PM

Gr8 immersion of stories of lives in other countries.

Tony Gough's curator insight, December 9, 2013 6:09 AM

Travel the world and read the short stories to learn more!

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Landfill Harmonic


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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 26, 8:19 PM

The people in this video live in the slums and cannot afford instruments so they have resorted to using recycled instruments made from garbage that was recovered from the landfill in the city. Seeing how the less fortunate make something beautiful out of something bad is amazing.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 13, 5:20 PM

While many are quick to judge those living in poverty, it is important to realize the innovation and creativity that can arise from these conditions. The children in this video show that one does not need wealth to live a cultured life. When people do not have a lot, they learn to utilize the resources at hand, even if that means using garbage. To see people so happy while having so little (at least by our standards in the United States) puts into question the American consumerist culture. 

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 7:02 PM

This video shows that even thoughts living in absolute poverty are able to create beautiful things. While the instruments are clearly made from trash the music they produce is almost impossible to tell apart from expensive proper instruments. The ingenuity of these people is remarkable and really an incredible thing to watch.

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Gentrification spelled out

Gentrification spelled out | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
As upscale, high-rise condos and hipster bars opened nearby, longtime customers joked: Is this really still “the ’hood”? Not anymore.

 

In a gentrifying neighborhood in Washington D.C. that was historically African-American, Fish in the ’Hood was an iconic restaurant that captured the feel of the area.  Just this May, the storefront restaurant was renamed Fish in the Neighborhood.

Questions to Ponder: Why?  Does it matter?  What does it mean?


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Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, March 6, 12:16 PM

This article was a very interesting read. It shines a light that, with a moderate and humble pace, gentrification might not completely dismantle a community's cultural identity. Although this shop-keep is making an attempt at keeping up with the change he see's in the neighborhood, it might not be entirely necessary. 

Bottom line, people who are new to a community should be entering and supporting local businesses that have ties to the neighborhood and not just the kitchy hipster bars that pop up like dandelions in an untended meadow.  

Thea Harvey-Brown's curator insight, April 24, 11:17 AM

This is a great article that focuses on the effects of gentrification on a single restaurant. This personal narrative reveals the lack of control that these originally lower income neighborhoods now face. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, September 25, 5:35 PM

Gentrification deals with the forcing out of lower income residents and making space available for the more affluent. The re-naming of Fish in the 'Hood shows how gentrification forces the culture  of entire communities to change. Although this restaurant was popular before, they were forced to re-brand so they can stay in business. Gentrification exiles the poor, with that their culture. This restaurant shows that, as more upscale business open up to service the needs of more affluent citizens, any business that has the perception of being the contrary will soon be out of business. This matters because it shows how gentrification destroys communities image, and culture for the sake of increasing revenue and real estate value. What is exhibit here is not only a socio-economic shift but also a racial shift as well. This neighborhood was predominately African American before it began to gentrify, "The 'Hood" is a saying that correlates with African American culture. This restaurant's re-branding shows that they no longer can continue to bring in customers with a name that is part of the African American vernacular. Furthermore, it shows the racial trends that go with gentrification where minority culture is pushed out as more money flows in.

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Concentrations of Wealth and Poverty

Concentrations of Wealth and Poverty | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, December 18, 2013 9:59 AM

See where the wealth and poverty are in America using this great map.

Chandrima Roy's curator insight, January 9, 10:44 PM

wonderful

 

Ishwer Singh's curator insight, January 20, 6:56 AM

This picture shows the cocentrations of poverty and affluence.  The areas hilighted in yellow show the areas which are wealthy and the dark blue showing the poor. This coincides with the amout of pay and the education levels in these countries. Areas such as Boston, New York and Washington show high cocentrations of affluence. These areas also have much higher education systems and more well -paid jobs. Countries which are highlighted in dark blue are countries with lesser education and lesser paid jobs. This shows the  extent at which poverty can affect a country.

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LANDFILL HARMONIC: Inspiring dreams one note at a time!

A heartfelt & moving story of how instruments made from recycled trash bring hope to children whose future is otherwise spiritless.

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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 14, 12:11 PM

This is really cool.  You would think that people living on a pile of trash would be really miserable and have a negative outlook on life, which in a way these kids probably do.  However they have found a way to bring joy to their lives and bring them closer together.  Going through the trash they are sometimes lucky enough to find actual instruments that have been thrown away, but more times than others only find pieces they can use.  Taking the pieces of trash that they find and turning them into instruments to make music is the highlight of most of these kids day.  They go to show that they can live in the worst of the worst but that doesn't mean that that will stop them from becoming something in life.

Jennifer Brown's curator insight, October 31, 3:46 PM

I saw this video a few months ago on Facebook and watching it again still makes the hair raise up on my arms. This video is inspiring! It shows that you can make something so beautufil like music out of something that was once considered someone trash. It also puts another perspective on recycling, most people only hear about bottles, cans, and other house hold goods being turned back into another product. These instruments might be an eye opener for products that don't get a second look.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 5, 10:59 AM

It is fascinating to see how a community living in very poor conditions have found a way to make their society and culture flourish. Where most residents make a living sorting through garbage, they have found a way to use that same trash to create instruments and an orchestra, adding rich culture to their community and giving the youth opportunities they would not have otherwise. It shows that while a community may live in less than ideal conditions, it is still possible to have a thriving culture.

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Gentrification spelled out

Gentrification spelled out | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
As upscale, high-rise condos and hipster bars opened nearby, longtime customers joked: Is this really still “the ’hood”? Not anymore.

 

In a gentrifying neighborhood in Washington D.C. that was historically African-American, Fish in the ’Hood was an iconic restaurant that captured the feel of the area.  Just this May, the storefront restaurant was renamed Fish in the Neighborhood.

Questions to Ponder: Why?  Does it matter?  What does it mean?


Via Seth Dixon, Steve Perkins
more...
Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, March 6, 12:16 PM

This article was a very interesting read. It shines a light that, with a moderate and humble pace, gentrification might not completely dismantle a community's cultural identity. Although this shop-keep is making an attempt at keeping up with the change he see's in the neighborhood, it might not be entirely necessary. 

Bottom line, people who are new to a community should be entering and supporting local businesses that have ties to the neighborhood and not just the kitchy hipster bars that pop up like dandelions in an untended meadow.  

Thea Harvey-Brown's curator insight, April 24, 11:17 AM

This is a great article that focuses on the effects of gentrification on a single restaurant. This personal narrative reveals the lack of control that these originally lower income neighborhoods now face. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, September 25, 5:35 PM

Gentrification deals with the forcing out of lower income residents and making space available for the more affluent. The re-naming of Fish in the 'Hood shows how gentrification forces the culture  of entire communities to change. Although this restaurant was popular before, they were forced to re-brand so they can stay in business. Gentrification exiles the poor, with that their culture. This restaurant shows that, as more upscale business open up to service the needs of more affluent citizens, any business that has the perception of being the contrary will soon be out of business. This matters because it shows how gentrification destroys communities image, and culture for the sake of increasing revenue and real estate value. What is exhibit here is not only a socio-economic shift but also a racial shift as well. This neighborhood was predominately African American before it began to gentrify, "The 'Hood" is a saying that correlates with African American culture. This restaurant's re-branding shows that they no longer can continue to bring in customers with a name that is part of the African American vernacular. Furthermore, it shows the racial trends that go with gentrification where minority culture is pushed out as more money flows in.