Human Geography is Everything!
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My daughter can’t read a map. And your kid probably can’t either

My daughter can’t read a map. And your kid probably can’t either | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
Ask any teenager for directions and he can pull up Google Maps quicker than you can recite an address. Pretty awesome, right? And I’ll be the first to admit that having a map in my phone that not only tells me where to turn but how long it will take me to get there is pretty amazing. I use it all the time, honestly. But even when I’m zoning out and listening to that soothing voice telling me where to turn, I have a mental picture in my head of her directions. And I never realized that my teenage daughter doesn’t have a map in her head, because she’s never really had to use one. Ever.

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education, spatial, mapping.


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Cade Johns's curator insight, August 16, 2015 9:26 PM

I think maps on your phone is great but what about if you get lost and you don't have service on your phone then what are you gonna do?Most young people have never had to read an actual map so most likely they won't be able to find their way back to civilization. CJ

Ethan Conner's curator insight, August 17, 2015 8:56 AM

Many people cannot read maps because of technolagy. This new form of maps are keeping children from the traditional way. Also keeping them from education.

Aaron Burnette's curator insight, August 26, 2015 9:50 AM

Although cell phone and technology is helpful, other people still believe in the prideful way. Reading paper maps.

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35 maps that explain how America is a nation of immigrants

35 maps that explain how America is a nation of immigrants | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
Take a tour through America's immigrant heritage — at its most and least welcoming

 

American politicians, and Americans themselves, love to call themselves "a nation of immigrants": a place where everyone's family has, at some point, chosen to come to seek freedom or a better life. America has managed to maintain that self-image through the forced migration of millions of African slaves, restrictive immigration laws based on fears of "inferior" races, and nativist movements that encouraged immigrants to assimilate or simply leave.

But while the reality of America's immigrant heritage is more complicated than the myth, it's still a fundamental truth of the country's history. It's impossible to understand the country today without knowing who's been kept out, who's been let in, and how they've been treated once they arrive.

 

Tags: migration, map.


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Bob Beaven's curator insight, January 29, 2015 2:19 PM

This article is highly interesting in both historical and social contexts.  The article asserts that the United States is a nation of immigrants and there is really no such thing as just "American".  The article even states that Native Americans themselves, at one point in ancient history, crossed a land bridge that was between Russia and Alaska.  Another interesting point of the article was the fact that many of the Latino immigrants today are actually picking up the English language faster than the European immigrants of old.  Interestingly, this article leads to the conclusion that the "New World" is really comprised of immigrants of the "Old World".

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, March 24, 2015 10:06 AM

Unit 2 reflection:

I find immigration/migration maps very interesting to study. This particular map really creates a visual description of where the people who make up the United States are really from. Not only can people study their origins, but also their cultures, beliefs, and religions. The combinations of these cultural attributes is what makes America so extremely diverse. 

Mrs. Madeck's curator insight, October 1, 2015 5:56 PM

Migration

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Map shows how race is a social construct

Map shows how race is a social construct | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"Americans' understanding of who counts as 'white' has changed dramatically throughout the country's history and even over the last century alone. This map — which covers a decade of immigration to the US, from 1892 to 1903 — is a dramatic illustration of what it looked like when 'white' wasn't the same thing as European.  Mouse over any part of the map to magnify it."

 

Tags: race, historical, USA, map.


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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, November 9, 2014 3:23 PM

And a political construct, too ...

Caterin Victor's curator insight, November 10, 2014 8:43 AM

 Up to me, race and colour don`t matter. Most important is the personality. America have now a black President. Is it better??

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Visualizing Time and Space

Visualizing Time and Space | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

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sriddle geo's curator insight, July 24, 2014 9:04 AM

Once again the educator in me is at work.  My little girl is asking me all the time , "If it's day here is it night on the other side of the world?"  Now I can show her.

Cory Erlandson's curator insight, July 24, 2014 9:48 AM

Great spatial representation of time and time zones, which is a weirdly fascinating topic for my students.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:00 PM

APHG-U1

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Uneven Population Distribution

Uneven Population Distribution | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"60% of Iceland's population lives in the red area."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 7, 2014 9:02 AM

Similar to Iceland, Australia's population is also highly clustered.    


Questions to Ponder: Why is Iceland's population so highly clustered?  What is it about the red (and white) areas on the map that explain this pattern?  What other layers of information do we need to properly contextualize this information?  


Tags: Iceland, population, density.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:39 PM

The majority of Iceland's population lives in that one space.

The geography of Iceland keeps the majority of people in the place that sustains life and comfort the best and easiest.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 10:50 AM

Iceland is a beautiful place, yet hash climates and landscapes make it hard for equal population distribution. At the same time, its population is under 400,000 people, making it a relatively small population compared to those of other European countries. With a population that small, it almost makes sense for people to live closer to one another. It would be easier to build infrastructure in a smaller area than to spread it out all over the island, where it would hardly be utilized. Also, the one densely populated area allows for a creative center where money and ideas can be developed.

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How to Make an iPhone Case Out of an Old Map


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 27, 2013 10:41 AM

Map lovers wanting to customize your phone cover, this is for you.  Read the full blog post here from maps.com.  


Tags: art, mapping.

Tony Hall's comment, April 28, 2013 5:50 AM
Nice:)
Tony Hall's curator insight, April 28, 2013 5:50 AM

Something for the GeoGeek in your life:)

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Africa Map Collection

Africa Map Collection | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 2014 11:58 PM

This is a fun collection of maps because you can see how the European view of Africa has changed over time. These maps contain nonexistent land marks such as the Mountains of Kong, these are here because cartographers made their maps based off incorrect information and then passed this information on to others who repeated their mistakes. African was known as the dark continent not only because of European racism but because of the lack of knowledge on behalf of the Europeans. 

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 11:19 AM

While most people perceive Africa as a country rather than a continent, European cartographers were even more oblivious to the make up of the continent. How is it possible that a mountain can directly across the continent. This also raises the question, how was conquering the continent possible if this mountain sat at the frontier of the continent? Wouldn't the natives know where to escape when European settlers came to conquer their land?

Luis Cabral's curator insight, March 8, 12:02 AM

This fabulous collection of African maps from 1535-1897 represents an historical geographic vision of both Africa and colonial visions of an imagined Africa.  I chose this particular map to display because it beautifully highlights the Mountains of Kong.  For generations, European cartographers erroneously believed that this long mountain range extended north of the West African coast and across the continent.  Currently this map collection is at Plymouth State, NH, but much of it is archive online here. 


Tags: Africa, cartography, colonialism, map.

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James Bond Travel Map

James Bond Travel Map | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

Where in the world has 007 been in his 30 movies? 


If that's a question you've always wanted to know, then this set of maps was made just for you.


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Tony Hall's curator insight, March 3, 2013 6:56 PM

James Bond is cool!

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, March 6, 2013 2:41 PM

Mondialisation...

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38 Maps You Never Knew You Needed

38 Maps You Never Knew You Needed | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"Some prime examples of fascinating maps." 


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Jordan Macpherson's comment, November 4, 2013 11:50 PM
CRAZY!
Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 27, 2014 7:46 PM

This shows 38 maps of the world in completely different formats with different map projections and colorings. 

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2014 11:43 AM

Map number 7 shows what New Yorkers complain about the most in their beloved city. The complaints are split into noise, graffiti and litter. It is no surprise that most New Yorkers complain about noise in Manhattan, well because it is one of the largest cities in the world, of course there is going to be noise. And then looking on the outskirts of the main city in Manhattan there are mostly complaints about litter. The map is mostly blue in most areas. As for graffiti there are a couple pockets spread out which is where I’m assuming most gang activity takes place. Queens, the Bronx, and Brooklyn is where most of the graffiti is located according to this map. I liked this ma because it shows what you’re going to see or hear in certain places in the City area.    

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How American Agriculture Works

How American Agriculture Works | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
There really are two different Americas: the heartland, and the coasts....

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Bob Beaven's curator insight, January 29, 2015 2:38 PM

These maps are interesting, in the fact that the heartland of the United States differs so much from either coast.  Both the coasts, as seen in the first map grow fruits and vegetables.  The center of the country grows wheat, and wheat is the dominant  crop of the country.  This might account for the reason why fruits and vegetables are more expensive than grain based products.  The second map helps to drive home this point even further, of how different the coasts are from the heartland.  What I also thought was funny, however, was the author's comment that it looks like an electoral map.  Perhaps, the reason heartland states tend to side with each other and republicans is because of shared interests in the political arena.

Adriene Mannas's curator insight, March 22, 2015 10:24 AM

Unit 5 Agricultural and Rural Land Use

 

This picture and article talks about the main use of the agricultural growth in the United States. It shows how most and almost all of the agribusiness is in the growth of feed and food for animals on the ranches rather than humans. The amount of money made is astounding with how far the table tilts toward animal feed.

 

This relates to Human Geography because agriculture is one of the main points. It shows how people use agribusiness and ow it leans more toward the consumption of animals rather than humans. 

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, May 25, 2015 1:22 PM

This link consists of two maps that show agricultural land use in America. Nearly all of the "breadbasket region" is used not to feed people, but rather to create feed for cows and other animals. 

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Africa, Uncolonized: A Detailed Look at an Alternate Continent

Africa, Uncolonized: A Detailed Look at an Alternate Continent | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
What if the Black Plague had killed off almost all Europeans? Then the Reconquista never happens. Spain and Portugal don't kickstart Europe's colonization of other continents. And this is what Africa might have looked like.

 

Tags: Africa, colonialism, borders, historical, map.


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Bob Beaven's curator insight, March 26, 2015 2:26 PM

An interesting fact for a geographer/historian to look at is how different events happening in history can affect a map.  This is very fascinating, because Africa or should I say Alkebu-Lan has very strong looking kingdoms without the Influence of Europe.  Another interesting element of the map is how it is not Euro-centric, Africa is shown as the top of the world.  I guess in this history, Northern Europe instead of being a powerhouse of the world, would be classified as the dark region (like the Congo was in our own world).  It is also interesting how the map is not Euro-centric, but the fact to keep in mind there is the old saying, history is written by the winner.  In this case, the map of the world was drawn by the winning Europeans as well, and this map completely reverses that.  Another interesting fact, is that the Iberian is part of an Islamic Empire.  It looks, as if in this history, Portugal was overcome by the "Arabes" and Spain never even attempted to launch the Reconquista.  History and Geography, especially Political Geography are very closely linked with one another.  

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 27, 2015 5:00 PM

I found this particularly interesting to read about, as alternative histories fascinate me. The "what if" questions that historians always ask themselves are fun to examine and illustrate, as they are shown in the alternative map of Africa. It's interesting to see just how different this map- drawn from historical accounts of ethnic and linguistic differences between the various African societies- is from the map of Africa we now have today. European colonizers drew borders without any consideration for the native populace, and that is today reflected in the rigid borders of African states that do not match historical ethnic boundaries. The concept of a Europe unable to recover from the Black Death would have serious repercussions for world history. It would allow for the progression of African economies and polities unmolested by European influences and the slave trade, completely reshaping the course of the continent's history. The increased influence of the Arab world would also be a plausible consequence of the decimation of Europe's population. This is an interesting concept, and it is very informative in the sense that it forces us to consider a multitude of factors that played a role in shaping the world as we see and live it today.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 30, 2015 7:04 AM

Alternative history is always fun. There is no question that Africa would be a different place today, if Europeans had never step foot on the shores of this great continent. Would the great African empires still be alive today? Would Africa be the dominant continent in world affairs? The history of civilization over the past 500 years would almost certainly be radically different. Instead of a Eurocentric world, we may have had an Afrocentric world. What this map really underscores, is the effect that colonialism had on Africa. The Africa we know today is a consequence of that era of European domination. While alternate history is fun, we must always remember the actual history that has occurred in Africa.

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World War II Led to a Revolution in Cartography

World War II Led to a Revolution in Cartography | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"More Americans came into contact with maps during World War II than in any previous moment in American history. From the elaborate and innovative inserts in the National Geographic to the schematic and tactical pictures in newspapers, maps were everywhere. On September 1, 1939, the Nazis invaded Poland, and by the end of the day a map of Europe could not be bought anywhere in the United States. In fact, Rand McNally reported selling more maps and atlases of the European theaters in the first two weeks of September than in all the years since the armistice of 1918. Two years later, the attack on Pearl Harbor again sparked a demand for maps."


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Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 25, 2014 10:04 AM

Global interaction and maps. WWII. 

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:59 PM

APHG-U1

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 14, 2014 2:06 PM

Whenever there is war, Americans want maps.  They want to know about where conflict is, how far away from home it is, and why people are being sent to the places they are being sent.  With the new map ideas in World War II from Harrison maps were made to better display distance and direction to people.  He used different projections in areas.  He also drew maps from different places, for example what does Japan look like when you are in Siberia.  Transforming flat maps back to having some sort of global shape was exactly what we needed to get away from the old outdated unreliable style of maps.

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China publishes new map

China publishes new map | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
China has published a new map of the entire country including the islands in the South China Sea (West Philippine Sea) in order to "better show" its territorial claim over the region.

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Jason Schneider's curator insight, April 2, 2015 9:44 PM

Not only does China have a strong economic system and the high population in the world, but they also claim South China Sea. Also since they are wealthy, then they hire maritime security to make sure other areas such as the Philippines and Malaysia don't attempt to take over China's seas. Also, the Philippines attempts to battle China over oil and natural gases but they fail against China because China's more populated than the Philippines. The main point of this map is to show how much of the ocean and sea China claims and they claim about 18% of water out of their land population.

David Lizotte's curator insight, April 23, 2015 1:09 PM

This map exemplifies how different countries have differing impressions of land/territory that they own. China views itself as this image depicted above. They honestly believe it. As ridiculous as it sounds I do understand why. China owns this region of the world and will continue to do so. They are claiming land and even forming new land throughout the South China Sea. What is important about the creating of land mass is that China then controls 200 nautical miles around whatever they construct. There is nothing the neighboring countries in the region can do about it. China knows it is a dominant military power and intimidates other countries.

For example, the island of Taiwan is claimed by China as a province. China does not recognize the "Republic of China" (ROC) which governs Taiwan and used to govern mainland China prior to the Chinese Civil War. China has even threatened the island with military use if the people openly declare a massive independent movement. There is a lot more to this history, more than a scoop can provide for, however in a nutshell, Taiwan is China's and will continue to be so. 

In another region of China bordering India and Pakistan, which conveys the expansive territory China covers as a country and its various neighboring countries, China is yet claiming another piece of land. As if the dispute between India and Pakistan was not great enough the two countries also differ over territory just north of the Kashmir border region. China also believes this territory is theirs, now making the land up for grabs between the three nations. China may or may not have historical ties that link it to this piece of land. But in either case it certainly views this territory as an area of land that is open for taking, in that it could eventually claim the territory as a whole. What would Pakistan and India do? These two countries have enough going on. 

Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:55 AM

At first when looking at this map, it seems just about right knowing that China is a huge territorial country, but we also see that this map, when compared to an older map, is different. In this map, we can see that the islands on the West, China has claimer part of there territory. This is simply an analysis of how China seeks geopolitical power over these islands. The map shows China’s claim over the South China Sea by marking ten dash lines around the region just off the coasts of Vietnam, Malaysia, Brunei, and the Philippines’ islands of Palawan and Luzon. These are all individual countries, that have there own culture, language, separate of that of China. The difference between this issue and perhaps that of Catalonia seeking independence over Spain, is that these countries like Malaysia and Brunei are already territorial countries. China is simply showing that they have the power to declare this map, even if its not true. 




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Place-based Geography Videos

Place-based Geography Videos | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

Professor Seth Dixon shares over 50 of his favorite geography videos in this online map http://bit.ly/KDY6C2


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Matt Davidson's curator insight, October 23, 2014 7:54 PM

Great site - showing locational context is important for not just Geography but every subject. How can we understand the complexities of topics like conflict or urban economies or agricultural histories.... without understanding locations and maps?

Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 3, 2014 12:02 PM

It was nice to see where everything was happening. I hope it gets updated to more current events. I wish we had something like this when we were looking at the invasion of Kuwait.

Caroline Ivy's curator insight, March 15, 2015 5:19 PM

Seth Dixon uses ArgGIS to juxtapose maps with the location a video is associated with. 

 

This idea has crossed my mind before. Now, a video can be contemplated with the spatial accuracy needed. This connects events to a place, and can help students more fully grasp the geospatial distribution of events. 

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19 Maps That Will Help You Put The United States In Perspective

19 Maps That Will Help You Put The United States In Perspective | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

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Mary Patrick Schoettinger's curator insight, March 18, 2013 10:30 AM

Great map tools for kids and adults to get a better understanding of relative size of US vs the world.

Heather Ramsey's curator insight, March 18, 2013 2:05 PM

This site has lots of great examples of size comparisons between the United States and other coutnries/continents around the world. Which one is the most surprising to you? Why do you think you had a different idea of the size of the place that surprised you?

Ursula Sola de Hinestrosa's curator insight, March 18, 2013 9:13 PM

A punta de TIC el mundo se achicó !

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James Bond Travel Map

James Bond Travel Map | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

Where in the world has 007 been in his 30 movies? 


If that's a question you've always wanted to know, then this set of maps was made just for you.


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Tony Hall's curator insight, March 3, 2013 6:56 PM

James Bond is cool!

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, March 6, 2013 2:41 PM

Mondialisation...

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Which Countries Don’t Have a Minimum Wage?

Which Countries Don’t Have a Minimum Wage? | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
In a surprising move, President Obama proposed during the State of the Union address to increasing the federal minimum wage to $9 an hour.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 23, 2013 9:13 PM

This made many people ask the question "how many countries have minimum wages?"  Nearly all countries in the world have a minimum wage or a partial minimum wage. 

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38 Maps You Never Knew You Needed

38 Maps You Never Knew You Needed | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"Some prime examples of fascinating maps." 


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Jordan Macpherson's comment, November 4, 2013 11:50 PM
CRAZY!
Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 27, 2014 7:46 PM

This shows 38 maps of the world in completely different formats with different map projections and colorings. 

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2014 11:43 AM

Map number 7 shows what New Yorkers complain about the most in their beloved city. The complaints are split into noise, graffiti and litter. It is no surprise that most New Yorkers complain about noise in Manhattan, well because it is one of the largest cities in the world, of course there is going to be noise. And then looking on the outskirts of the main city in Manhattan there are mostly complaints about litter. The map is mostly blue in most areas. As for graffiti there are a couple pockets spread out which is where I’m assuming most gang activity takes place. Queens, the Bronx, and Brooklyn is where most of the graffiti is located according to this map. I liked this ma because it shows what you’re going to see or hear in certain places in the City area.