Human Geography is Everything!
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Rostow Model

The Rostow Model

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 14, 1:14 PM

The Rostow Model is an important and influential way of thinking about industry and economic geography (and a part of the AP and IB geography curricula).  This slideshare for gives a solid overview of the 5 stages of the model and also provides examples and critiques of the model. 

 

Tags: industry, development, economic, APHG, unit 6 industry.

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Nicaragua's Controversial Canal

The proposed Nicaragua Canal could be one of the largest engineering projects in history and promises to bring thousands of jobs to the impoverished country. But the government’s secretive deal with a Chinese-led firm has some Nicaraguans raising the alarm about displacement and environmental destruction in the canal’s path.

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Blake Joseph's curator insight, April 24, 2015 4:38 PM

The Chinese government is seriously considering plans to build a new canal through Nicaragua that will rival the United States' Panama canal. The size of the planned canal will be much larger than the Panama canal, allowing much bigger freighters and cargo vessels to be able to pass through it to and from the Chinese mainland. While many Nicaraguans are enthusiastic about the potential jobs and money involved in the project, others can see through this and sense great problems for the country if completed. The canal would destroy many environments within Nicaragua such as Lake Nicaragua and the forest that are located nearby, displacing many people who live and depend on the area for food and work. China is fast becoming a world superpower, and is alarmingly similar to the old Soviet Union as far as a lack of environmental protection and the welfare of citizens. I fear the future environmental impact this will have on Nicaragua could be devastatingly similar to the fatal impacts of other old Soviet failures like the Aral Sea or Chernobyl (without the radioactive isotopes, of course). I think many Nicaraguans do as well.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 1, 2015 2:13 AM


Chapter 5

Humans value, change and protect landscapes

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:12 AM

I'm fascinated by massive geo-engineering projects.  Usually, the proponents of the project will support it claiming that by reconfiguring the geographic settings it will lead to the economic growth of the country and strengthen their political situation.  Opponents cite that traditional land use patterns will get disrupted, the poor will be displaced, and the environment will be degraded. This canal is not so very different from many other geo-engineering projects in that respect.

 

Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, industry, economic, environment, political, resources, political ecology.

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Globalization and the Textile Industry

"On the 100th anniversary of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire, little has changed in the global sweatshop economy. Workers are again trapped and burned to death behind locked exit gates."


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Danielle Bellefeuille's curator insight, May 10, 2014 6:16 PM

The sad reality of the new division of labor, we are moving backwards instead of forwards with labor policies and widening the gap between core and periphery countries. We need to stand up and advocate for fair trade. These countries rely on us for sources of unemployment, and we need to give them better wages, safer working conditions, and help them push pass this dependency, and grow into more economically and socially strong countries.

 

http://www.laborrights.org

Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 10, 2014 8:03 PM

The triangle shirtwaist factory in New York was a revolutionary turning point in labor regulations. Following this unfortunate event there had been many rules and laws that took effect in order to help the working people in factories and other harmful work places. The textile industry had been such an impact on globalization because this product had been so greatly treasured that countries all around the world were getting their fair share of producing a good that was in such high demand and through the use of globalization transport created an higher demand for textiles. Although, the boom of the textile industry came with the sacrifice of innocent civilians who worked endlessly just to feed their family. Regulations and legislation have to be put into effect to protect our people and our economy. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:17 AM

One of the first industries to be impacted by what is today called globalization was the textile industry and the successive waves of globalization continue to alter the geography of the textile industry.  This video shows how historical problems in the U.S. textile industry are seen today in countries such as Bangladesh, as does this interactive feature.  The following paragraph is from a Geography News Network podcast / article that Julie Dixon and I co-authored for Maps101 about the Bangladeshi garment industry:     


Many developing countries with the majority of their laborers working in agriculture welcome outsourced labor from the West. This is seen as a way to nurture industrialization, even if it is on the terms of trans-national corporations. Countless workers seek employment in textile factories simply because low pay is still an entry into the cash economy and it is one of the few jobs rural migrants can find when they first enter the big city. In such locations, Western labor, construction, and environmental standards are not priorities because the population’s basic needs haven’t been met, so the responsibility falls to the global companies—but their aim is to cut costs as much as possible to remain competitive.  From its emergence in textiles back in the late 1970’s, Bangladesh in 2013 made $19 billion in the export-oriented, ready-made garment industry, employing 4 million workers, most of whom are women. 


Listen to more of this Geography News Network podcast or read it here. 


Tags: Bangladesh, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

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Watch the Earth Warm Since 1880

Watch the Earth Warm Since 1880 | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"It can be difficult to conceive of the long process that's led the world to having its nine hottest years on record all after 2000. That's why it's nice that NASA has generated this nifty animation, which shows temperature abnormalities for every month of the past 13 decades. Watch reddish warm zones spread over the globe as time rolls past, like a virulent fever covering the body of a sick host."

 


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Follow the Things

"Who makes the things that we buy?  Few of us know. They seem untouched by human hands. Occasionally there's a news story, a documentary film, or an artwork showing the hidden ingredients in our coffee, t-shirts, or iPads. They often 'expose' unpleasant working conditions to encourage more 'ethical' consumer or corporate behaviour. followthethings.com is this work's 'online store'. Here you can find out who has followed what, why and how; the techniques used to 'grab' its audiences; the discussions and impacts that this has provoked; and how to follow things yourself."
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Fran Martin's curator insight, September 10, 2013 3:37 AM

Great website by colleague Ian Cook at Exeter University

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, September 10, 2013 3:56 AM

About Globalisation, flows and production today. 

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:32 PM

Where did your T-Shirt come from?   Where did the food your parents bought at the grocery store come from?  What's the origin of the components in your cell phone?  These questions all allude to what geographers call a commodity chain analysis.  Analyzing where the consumer goods that we use every day came from can make global issues hit a little closer to home and reinforce concepts such as globalization. The website Follow the Things is a great resource for learning  about commodity chains and mapping out your own personal geographies.

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Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World

Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
Investigate for yourself the mechanisms of global trade

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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 7:57 PM
This is a pretty informative interactive map of the largest ports in the world. Very well put together to help some understandings of trade. Most of the ports are on the East coast of China which is the Pacific Sea. The reason there are probably so many here in China is because they make a large amount of product that needs to be shipped worldwide. They are like the leading country in imports and exports to other global or major global markets.
Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 7:40 PM

This more clearly shows the regional restructuring of the global economy than just about anything I've ever seen, especially manufacturing.  The 8 largest and busiest ports in the world are all in East or Southeast Asia (and 11 of the top 13).  A quick glance at the historical charts will show that most of these were relatively minor ports that have exploded in the last 20 years.  


New Jersey at 24

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, East Asia, industry, economic.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:22 AM

This more clearly shows the regional restructuring of the global economy than just about anything I've ever seen, especially manufacturing.  The 8 largest and busiest ports in the world are all in East or Southeast Asia (and 11 of the top 13).  A quick glance at the historical charts will show that most of these were relatively minor ports that have exploded in the last 20 years.  

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, East Asia, industry, economic.

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These Charts Show How Globalization Has Gone Digital

These Charts Show How Globalization Has Gone Digital | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"Yes, globalization. For many people, that word conjures up, at best, images of container ships moving manufactured goods from far-flung factories. At worst, it harkens back to acrid debates about trade deficits, currency wars and jobs moving to China. In fact, since the Great Recession of 2008, the global flow of goods and services has flattened, and cross-border capital flows have declined sharply. But globalization overall isn't on the wane. Like so much in our world today, it has reinvented itself by going digital."

 

Tags: technology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.


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Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 7:31 PM
The times, they are a-changin'
Alisha Meyer's curator insight, March 24, 9:04 AM
Our world is changing, that is inevitable.  It's how we decide to use the technology and knowledge we now have to better ourselves or destroy ourselves.
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A map of all the underwater cables that connect the internet

A map of all the underwater cables that connect the internet | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
Do you know how the internet gets across the ocean? This amazing map shows every cable that makes it possible.

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Olivier Tabary's curator insight, March 25, 2015 4:28 PM

And no, not everything has turned virtual! We still rely on concrete stuff. Cables network says a lot about the way our World works. 

Logan Haller's curator insight, May 25, 2015 9:07 PM

This article deals with unit 1 because it has to do with maps. This map shows how underwater cables connect the internet throughout the world. The cables transmit 99% of international data instantly. On this map you can also see latency. Another map in this article shows 1912 trade routes and underwater cables today. The routes are similar and the interdependency has stayed but the methods and meanings for each of these things are different. To pass the ocean is risky by the investments, and trading. Sailors took tHess risks and now the tech companies are taking them. The cables are thin in the deep water equalling 3 inches across. In addition the cables are thicker in shallower water. The interesting thing is these cables can go as deep as Mount Everest is high. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:12 AM

Because globalization.  


Tags: Time-Space Compression, development, technology, economic, globalization, industry, unit 6 industry.

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Global Oil Reserves

Global Oil Reserves | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

Who has the oil? http://pic.twitter.com/7Njc7OD8rw


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Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, April 1, 12:19 AM

Natural resources are not evenly distributed...this distribution pattern impacts global economics, industrialization, development and politics tremendously.  


Tags: industry, economic, energy, resources.

Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, April 1, 7:35 PM

Natural resources are not evenly distributed...this distribution pattern impacts global economics, industrialization, development and politics tremendously.  


Tags: industry, economic, energy, resources.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:17 AM

Natural resources are not evenly distributed...this distribution pattern impacts global economics, industrialization, development and politics tremendously.  


Tags: industry, economic, energy, resources.

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Inequality and the Gini Coefficient

Inequality and the Gini Coefficient | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
Think everyone should just pull themselves up by their bootstraps? Try this one on for size.

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:00 PM

Educating in poverty

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, October 16, 2013 7:47 AM

Do you find this information surprising?

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:20 AM

This video shows the place matters; a Washington D.C. educator shows how food deserts and other spatial problems of poverty impact his students on a daily basis.  We usually look at life expectancy data at the national scale and that obscures some of the real issues of poverty in developed countries.  Above is a map that shows the Gini index which measures the degree of economic inequality (the Gini coefficient was recently added to the APHG course content for the Industrialization and Economic Development unit).  Here are some maps and data from the World Bank that utilizes the Gini Index as well as an interactive Gapminder graph.  


Tags: industry, location, place, migration, APHG, poverty, socioeconomic.

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T-Shirt Travels

When filmmaker Shantha Bloemen was stationed in a remote village in Zambia as a worker with an international aid organization, she had to adjust to living in a different culture. But one thing struck her as oddly familiar: almost everyone in the village wore secondhand clothing from the West. Bloemen began to imagine stories about the people who used to wear the clothing, wondering if the original owners had any idea that the castoffs they had given to charities ended up being sold to Africans half a world away.


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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, July 19, 2013 9:48 AM

It's fascinating to look at the effects of globalization, and a great look at how economies change.  When people in the Western world drop a bag of clothes off at a charity, I doubt we think they'd end up in a village in Africa. Warning:  it does get a little preachy at the end. 

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:44 PM

Is direct aid a good thing or not? How does secondhand clothing impact local economies?

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:57 PM

Westernization is a popular theme thats happening in the East. Even though people don't know it, the clothes they give away may be some that are taken to places like Africa. Hand-me-downs are popular in the U.S. but even more so in Africa. The t-shirt you give away to someone might end up across the world. Who knows.

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The Geography of a Pencil

A film from the Competitive Enterprise Institute, adapted from the 1958 essay by Leonard E. Read.

 

This year's Geography Awareness Week's theme was "Declare Your Interdependence!"  The GAW poster for 2012 focused on the Geography of a Pencil and this video works together nicely as a supplement to that poster.  You may see the economics of capitalism and globalization in a less optimistic light than Leonard Read, but the theme of interconnectedness makes this a great resource. 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 17, 2013 4:17 PM

This year's Geography Awareness Week's theme was "Declare Your Interdependence!"  The GAW poster for 2012 focused on the Geography of a Pencil and this video works together nicely as a supplement to that poster.  You may see the economics of capitalism and globalization in a less optimistic light than Leonard Read, but the theme of interconnectedness makes this a great resource.

Luke Walker's curator insight, October 5, 2014 9:12 AM

An interesting take on the pencil.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:23 AM

This year's Geography Awareness Week's theme was "Declare Your Interdependence!"  The GAW poster for 2012 focused on the Geography of a Pencil and this video works together nicely as a supplement to that poster.  You may see the economics of capitalism and globalization in a less optimistic light than Leonard Read, but the theme of interconnectedness makes this a great resource.