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Feeding the Whole World

"Louise Fresco argues that a smart approach to large-scale, industrial farming and food production will feed our planet's incoming population of nine billion. Only foods like (the scorned) supermarket white bread, she says, will nourish on a global scale."


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Marianne Naughton's curator insight, October 19, 12:07 PM

Feed The World ...

dilaycock's curator insight, October 19, 6:45 PM

Fresco argues that we tend to see "home-made" agriculture as a thing of beauty, whereas the reality is that many small scale farmers struggle and live a subsistence lifestyle. The adoration of small-scale farming, notes Fresco, is a luxury to those who can afford it. Large-scale production has increased the availability and affordability of food. Food production should be given as high a priority as climate change and sustainability, and we should seriously consider ways in which land can be used as a multi-purpose space that includes agriculture.

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, October 24, 10:55 AM

Louise Fresco speaks of local food production and small scale control

and the entire food nework

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Where China and Kazakhstan Meet

Where China and Kazakhstan Meet | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

"While people often say that borders aren’t visible from space, the line between Kazakhstan and China could not be more clear in this satellite image. Acquired by the Landsat 8 satellite on September 9, 2013, the image shows northwestern China around the city of Qoqek and far eastern Kazakhstan near Lake Balqash.

The border between the two countries is defined by land-use policies. In China, land use is intense. Only 11.62 percent of China’s land is arable. Pressed by a need to produce food for 1.3 billion people, China farms just about any land that can be sustained for agriculture. Fields are dark green in contrast to the surrounding arid landscape, a sign that the agriculture is irrigated. As of 2006, about 65 percent of China’s fresh water was used for agriculture, irrigating 629,000 square kilometers (243,000 square miles) of farmland, an area slightly smaller than the state of Texas.

The story is quite different in Kazakhstan. Here, large industrial-sized farms dominate, an artifact of Soviet-era agriculture. While agriculture is an important sector in the Kazakh economy, eastern Kazakhstan is a minor growing area. Only 0.03 percent of Kazakhstan’s land is devoted to permanent agriculture, with 20,660 square kilometers being irrigated. The land along the Chinese border is minimally used, though rectangular shapes show that farming does occur in the region. Much of the agriculture in this region is rain-fed, so the fields are tan much like the surrounding natural landscape."

 

Tags: remote sensing, land use, environment, geospatial, environment modify, food, agriculture, agricultural land change.


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Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, September 18, 5:26 AM

what a difference a govt makes!

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 24, 2:38 PM

This photo shows what happens when a government is dedicated to developing agricultural industry. With a population so large it is critical that they capitalize on all their irritable land and there for that is why the border is so drastically different. In China they need the land to be used when it is possible.  

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 14, 2:11 PM

The border between Kazakhstan and China holds stark contrasts. The Kazakh side is barren desert, with almost no agricultural or transportation system development. On the other side, agricultural plots are squished right up to the border, and an urban center sits right off of the border. When a country has a population of over a billion people, it needs to produce food for those people. China uses almost all of the land it can to grow food, and it has shelled out money in order to make desolate landscapes with little agricultural potential into productive areas. Kazakhstan has a relatively small population with little economic development, so it does not need to utilize and manipulate marginal lands in order to continue growth. 

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Gastrodiplomacy: Cooking Up A Tasty Lesson On War And Peace

Gastrodiplomacy: Cooking Up A Tasty Lesson On War And Peace | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
An international relations scholar is using her students' love of food to teach them about global conflicts. It's a form of winning hearts and minds that's gaining traction among world governments.

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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, March 25, 3:37 PM

The way to world peace may be through our stomachs. Great idea!

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, March 25, 3:38 PM

The way to world peace may be through our hearts and stomachs. Great idea!

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, March 30, 7:58 PM

Vínculos Poderosos! Pilares da Geografia Vivida.

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Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s

Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
What America can learn from one of the most sustainable food nations on Earth.

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Edelin Espino's curator insight, November 27, 2:34 PM

McDonalds broke in Quinoa Bolivia. A somewhat interesting news because McDonalds is a fast food restaurant quite famous and to break is pretty rare. But Bolivians prefer hamburgers that the Chachitas do and they also prefer to eat their daily diet than fast food. This place called Quinoa in Bolivia is a really interesting place free of McDonald.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 4:28 PM

Bolivia is one of the few countries where McDonalds failed, so Bolivia is obviously doing something right in regards to its food industry. Bolivians' love of traditional food coupled with the loyalty to street vendors and local businesses. Bolivia does not treat its food industries as a potential market, but instead many food transactions involve trade as opposed to currency. Laws conserving local food culture and the elimination of most foreign parties has allowed for a very effective food sovereignty. 

 

Many countries, especially the United States, could benefit from this "food sovereignty", where the local individuals are honored and protected while large corporations are kept an arm's length away. Not only does this boost local small scale economies, but it would decrease pollution and preserve food culture.   

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 12:00 AM

"A Country With No McDonalds". I read this and thought to myself, how bad can that be? McDonalds isn't exactly the best option for food. In Bolivia, McDonalds doesn't exist and hasn't for about a decade. Believe it or not, McDonalds couldn't survive in the mountainous area so they were forced to close down in 2002. In 2011, a documentary was made about how odd it was that Bolivia didn't have a McDonalds. The documentary tells us that one of the main reasons the fast food restaurant closed down was because Bolivians preferred their traditional food over fast food. The documentary also stated that Bolivians do love hamburgers, which are not traditional. However, they prefer to buy them from the many indigenous women hawking food on the streets. People line up for these hamburgers on the street, so its almost like their own form of McDonalds. Mostly, they prefer to buy from people they have a relationship with, typically from their own community.

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In A Grain Of Golden Rice, A World Of Controversy Over GMO Foods

In A Grain Of Golden Rice, A World Of Controversy Over GMO Foods | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
A rice enriched with beta-carotene promises to boost the health of poor children around the world. But critics say golden rice is also a clever PR move for a biotech industry driven by profits, not humanitarianism.

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Kevin Cournoyer's comment, May 1, 2013 12:52 AM
As important and widely used crops go, rice is probably the most important and the most widely used in the world. As a diet staple in Asia and Africa, it helps to feed billions of people everyday. Genetically modified race promises not only nourishment, but increased nutrients for the people who consume it as a major part of their diets. The recent test of this genetically modified rice on Chinese children without full disclosure of what the rice was, however, was seen as a huge problem by many.
The ethicality of the situation is what bothered most opponents of the test, but those in favor of the super rice argue that it is good for everyone, because it helps impoverished populations who are otherwise unable to acquire the nutrients they need. This article highlights the importance of rice in a vast physical geographic context, but also deals with the idea of economic and cultural geography because of the modified rice’s impact on a large number of people’s eating habits and standard of living.
Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 7:14 PM

     This a very difficult debate because whoever is against using any type of enhancement  to food or any other product, no matter if is for their benefit they wont want to here about it. But I do feel that if is for the best and if is going to help for a better nutrition, I think is a good idea. I think that people are going to consume rice no matter what, if the price of the rice doesn’t goes up, the consumption will be the same but if they raise the prices because it has “more vitamins” them the consumption will be less. The world every day is getting poorer and people are having aDifficult time feeding their love ones.

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 4, 2013 3:07 PM

I thought this NPR broadcast was a great out of class referece to listen too.  As it explaine all the work and research that was being done with GMOs, it also exposed them for there flaws and what the real motives behind them are. While this ex source of rice with extra vitman A will deffenitly provid more nutitonal value then regular rice, it also provides higher profit margins for the bioengneer compaines that make it. So its almost hard to say weather GMOs are a bad or good thing beacuse they do have benifts, but one thing is clear there not just being made to help the poor, there being made for big profit possibilities.

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Fields of Green Spring up in Saudi Arabia

Fields of Green Spring up in Saudi Arabia | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
Saudi Arabia is drilling for a resource possibly more precious than oil by tapping hidden reserves of water in the Syrian Desert.

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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 23, 8:33 PM

The transformation of Saudi Arabia's greenery is a smart idea and I can imagine incredibly beneficial.  We always hear about not wanting to be oil dependent on a foreign countries.  What do oil rich countries say?  Well, Saudi Arabia found a solution for not wanting to be dependent on foreign countries for their agricultural needs.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 26, 9:37 PM

From 1987-2012 NASA has been recording some very strange topography from satellite imaging. Green patches have been presenting themselves as a result of deep oil drilling. In search of fossil fuels far below the desert's crust, water reserves have been located. These water reserves are believed to have been trapped from the last Ice Age. It is because of this discovery that these water reserves have been tapped and irrigation has taken place.Irrigation is being used to water fields with a sprinkler system. This process is known as center-pivot irrigation. Although experts do not know how much water could be below the surface, it is estimated it may only be enough to last for 50 years. With this estimation this may only be a temporary aid to this otherwise dry country.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 1:52 AM

It's amazing to see how Saudi Arabia is able to transform an area once categorized by it's dryness and lack of vegetation is now being Terra-formed into a green area. This shows what huge amounts of money can do, physically alter the earth and landscapes. Because of the massive amounts of oil available to the Saudi's they are able to ship in a more valuable resource, water.

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Where Does the South Begin?

Where Does the South Begin? | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
Roads? Religion? Accent? Food? Which factor dictates where the North ends?

 

This is a great intellectual expercise to help student think about regions and how we define them.  The article can help also inform some of their thinking since one of the main problems for students in drawing regional boundaries is a lack of place-based knowledge.   

 

Tags: regions, USA.


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:49 PM

Borders... the first thing I think of was a giant bookstore near my hometown... it now ceases to exist, having been replaced by Barnes and Nobel...  As for the political organization of space, I could apply this situation and laugh.  Borders will cease to be, and they will be called after people's last names!  I think this has already happened, when people unite together in countries such as the USA- although borders are specific, the general federal laws and many policies still apply in all states... generally. And people's names are often the namesakes of places.  I don't like the idea of borders, though, it seems like a bunch of warmongers trying to get ahead in a world where they can't truly cheat death, so they cheat other people of land that may have been decreed in ancient documents as property of their ancestors, or even in accordance with the righteousness of the universe and what should be alloted to whom.  Ownership is a concept of denial, because no one can truly own anything, not even our bodies, which contain trillions of infinite universes the size of the large one around us that we commonly refer to.  Borders are relative, and will likely become recognized as obsolete.  I know this was abstract, but it's my thoughts on the topic.

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Feeding Our Hungry Planet

"By 2050, the world's population will likely increase 35 percent. But is growing more food the only option—or even the best? National Geographic investigates the challenges and solutions to feeding everyone on our planet, based on an eight-month series in National Geographic magazine.  Visit http://natgeofood.com for ongoing coverage of food issues as we investigate the Future of Food today on World Food Day."

 

Tags: sustainability, agriculture, food production, unit 5 agriculture.


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Truthbehere2's curator insight, October 17, 10:30 AM

I think I might as well buy some land and plant my own huge garden for this crap coming up and have a fence around my yard too

Nancy Watson's curator insight, October 19, 8:53 AM

Population increase is just part of the story. How do we feed everyone? How will we provide for the needs of everyone?  Can the earth sustain the use of her resources and the impact of our growing needs and output. First we must eat. Can we learn to do that wisely? 

Bella Reagan's curator insight, November 28, 5:48 PM

Unit 2-Population

 

This video was about the growing population in the world and as a result the growing food demand. This video points out that even though more food production seems like the solution, instead other solutions are more logical. Solutions include reducing wastes, preserving forests, being more productive on current farms and more. It states that farming is a huge business but it goes towards more than growing food for people to eat but also for other things like animals and materials. The worlds population is growing and there needs to be a change in food industries to keep thriving. 

 

This relates to unit 2 about population since it is thinking of ways to adapt to the worlds growing population. By 2050 it is predicted that population will increase by 33% and something has to change about food in order for people to stay fed. There is too much food being wasted that if that could be decreased it could make a huge difference. The video made a good point that it's not that we need more food it's that we need to manage and prioritize production.  

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Sustaining Seven Billion People

Sustaining Seven Billion People | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

"With seven billion people now living on Earth, the ever growing demand is putting unprecedented pressure on global resources—especially forests, water, and food. How can Earth’s resources be managed best to support so many people? One key is tracking the sum of what is available, and perhaps nothing is better suited to that task than satellites."

 


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Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, July 6, 12:09 PM

Such studies of the agriculture around the world are essential. The way we are doing agriculture to support seven billion people now, peaking at 9-10 billion in another 60 years, it is clear that we are putting severe strains on the environment.  But we have grown lazy, and we are doing it all wrong.

 

We CAN drastically reduce the amount of meat we consume, and thus quickly reduce the amount of arable land we need.  We CAN grow plants in ways that actually sequester more carbon and improve the soil it over time rather than erode and degrade.  And we CAN in fact grow all the food we need in the space we live in, thus enabling us to recycle all the water used as well, which is mostly just lost in evaporation. 

Tom Cockburn's curator insight, July 13, 5:52 AM

Vital debate for the future

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 7:44 PM

APHG-U2

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All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella

All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
Turkish hazelnuts, Malaysian palm oil, Nigerian cocoa, Brazilian sugar, French vanilla...

 

Some 250,000 tons of Nutella are now sold across 75 countries around the world every year, according to the OECD. Nutella is a perfect example of what globalization has meant for popular foodstuffs: Not only is it sold everywhere, but its ingredients are sourced from all over the place too.


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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, January 28, 1:26 PM

Some things that we take for granted are and come from all over the world. As you said in last class just because something says that it is not made in China doesnt mean that their arent any resources that the company used to creat the item that didn't come from China or any other power house place. In this case the Palm Oil comesd from Malaysia, Hazelnut comes from Turkey, Cocoa from Nigeria, Vainilla from Brazil and, Vainilla and Sugar from France.

Mrs Parkinson's curator insight, February 12, 3:48 PM

GCSE Globalisation info - great case study

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 10:55 AM

I was surprised to see how many countries contribute to s single jar of nutella. I have always assumed it came straight from Italy just because it is an Italian commodity. It is a positive thing to see because you look at the commerce and trade that is generated throughout the world through this one brand alone

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Breakfasts Around the World


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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 11:03 AM

These pictures are very interesting and makes you think about the kinds of breakfast you saw when growing up. These pictures allow us to see the kinds of food cultivated in these areas of the world and how they interprete the use of each one. The pictures also show us how each place is related. For example, some of the dishes looked alike in that most of the plate was breads. It makes you wonder where that tradition came from. These pictures also let the viewer in on the development or wealth of the country. Some countries only have a piece of bread and a coffee for breakfast, where other places have huge platefuls of all different kinds of food. Does the amount of food you eat for breakfast have to do with how developed your country is? Food seems so simple, but it can lead to many different interpretations for people. 

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 21, 2013 9:17 AM

Typically when I think about different cultural foods I think about lunch or dinner rather than breakfast. When I think about Italy I think about meatballs, pasta, pizza, and gelato. When I think about Germany I think about a lot of meats. However what never really comes to mind is breakfast. Breakfast is one of my absolute favorite meals on the day. I love going out to breakfast and getting some eggs, homefries, sausage, and maybe even a grilled blueberry muffin. This summer I traveled to Italy and that was the first time I realized that breakfast is just as different in their Culture as their lunch and dinner. It was interesting how different things were. They had toast and yogurt, but the yogurt didn't taste the same as it does in America.  It is amazing how different each countries breakfast is in comparison to what we are used to. Some things we consider lunch might be served in another countries breakfast meal. For example Deli meats. It is interesting to see how different each culture really is. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:10 AM

Countries each have their own foods that are unique and freshly made by families everyday. They use foods that are frequently grown and found in the area to make their meals. For example china eats a lot of fish because it is part of their culture. Also people of spanish and mexican cultures are known for cooking spicy delcious foods. Food is apart of what creates cultures.

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Agriculture: Back to the Start

Coldplay's haunting classic 'The Scientist' is performed by country music legend Willie Nelson for the soundtrack of the short film entitled, "Back to the St...

 

Sure this is an animated commercial for Chipotle Grill, but this perfectly encapsulates the beliefs, values and ethics that underscore the organic farming movement. 


Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Aurora Rider's curator insight, October 24, 10:14 AM

Sure this is a Chipotle commercial but is does a good job at showing the belief that we should go back to the old way of farming. The video shows a family farm being taken over by what appears to be some big corporation. Upon being taken over, the animals are confined in small compartments and injected by what appears to be antibiotics and some other unknown substance. The factories they are sent to are polluting the place. The farmer sees all of this and decides to go back to the start.

jada_chace's curator insight, October 26, 7:17 PM

In the video it shows how the world has evolved in the way that humans take action on Mother Nature’s ways. In the beginning, there was a small family farm that was growing crops and animals. Shortly after that, it showed how small family farms are being taken over by the big agribusinesses. In today’s society that tends to happen more and more, which can be both good and bad on our economy. Unless people don’t make a change about the way we treat our food, nothing in our economy is going to get better. 

Cassie Brannan's curator insight, December 9, 10:21 PM

This animated film shows you what agriculture is really like. Sometimes it is difficult to be a farmer because of all of the climate changes. When the weather changes off and on, it can kill the crops, making it harder for farmers to find food. So as you can see, farmers go through a lot and it take a lot of hard work to be a successful farmer.

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What You Need to Know About Genetically Engineered Food

What You Need to Know About Genetically Engineered Food | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
Myths and facts about health, corruption, and saving the world

Tags: food, agriculture, agribusiness, locavore, unit 5 agriculture.


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Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 4:04 PM
An interesting article to read, it talked about the genetically modified seeds and food that is created by companies and then grown by American and other farmers worldwide. This article relates to the globalization point that we talked about in class. The seeds are genetically modified here or elsewhere in the world and then sent to farmers all over the globe to grow for increased profit typically. Many countries around the world, especially third world countries, have food shortages and by genetically modifying food so that farmers can get a bigger harvest, more people will be fed and less would die to famine and malnutrition. Like David, I tried to keep an open mind and not choose a side while I was reading. The article did seem quite vague regarding argument points however it gave facts left and right which I found to be new to me and fairly interesting, learning that 70% of food that we eat has at least one GE ingredient. Time will tell if this has prolonged pros/cons I suppose.
Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, October 24, 2013 1:41 PM

I love the hard facts that this article presents, in a very unbiased way. I've heard many claims from 'both sides of the aisle' about GE crops, but have never in one article seen such a clear and concise representation on the actual truths (or myths) surrounding the GMO debate.  

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 4:59 PM

I mentioned this through an allusion in another article, but GMOs and the movements against them perplex me.  I don't think that fossil-fuel burning engines are natural, but many anti GMO people that claim they are bad for the environment leave me completely stunned as to their intolerance for what could possibly  benefit other people.  I feel very much an outsider when I examine many topics of controversy related to GMOs, and I am quite sure that I have consumed them before -- and loved them?  as for the FDA... I don't approve of the FDA.  They like more money coming into their pocket more than bettered well-being of citizens.  When I mentioned to my doctor that I wanted to apply for medical marijuana for a series of conditions that I have following a severe accident, I was told that they refused because it was not fully endorsed, approved, or even allowed by the FDA.  That really pissed me off because I suffer from excruciating pain every day and night of my life.  Could you imagine being a poor person in need of food, and the only viable way of getting food was through the production of GMOs...? and then some pseudo-hippie activists that didn't live through the 1960s trying to be all like, "We don't want anyone to have GMOs!"... I pose that abstractly, because I view most everything with a level of abstraction and distance from the situation, sampling perspectives with which I may empathize or consider.  I keep thinking that this world around us all came from a big bang, with other possible universes before that, and something  before that... and I really can't see Capitalism ever becoming as bad as it is, with such disregard for other people's wellbeing, until I look at today's world.

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How Big a Backyard Would You Need to Live Off the Land?

How Big a Backyard Would You Need to Live Off the Land? | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

Tags: infographic, food, agriculture, sustainability, urban, urban ecology, locavore, land use, unit 5 agriculture, unit 7 cities.


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Crissy Borton's comment, September 11, 2012 8:36 PM
Looking at purchasing a house in the next year or so and this is one thing we have been looking at. Although we don't want to raise our own meat we would like to grow everything else we eat.
Courtney Holbert's curator insight, February 3, 2013 10:44 PM

Good visual representation of what it would take to be self sufficient.

Chris Scott's curator insight, July 14, 2013 9:51 AM

If you need a backyard that is about 2 acres to live off the land imagine how big of a backyard you would need if you had a family of 8.