Human Geography Too
Follow
Find tag "borders"
1.3K views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Complex International Borders

More complex international borders in this follow up to part 1. 
In this video I look at even more enclaves and exclaves."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 9, 8:09 AM

This video (like part 1) shows some great examples of how the political organization of space and administration of borders can get complicated.  Here are the examples (and time in the video when they are covered in the video) on these complex borders:


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty, video.

harrison babbitt's curator insight, February 1, 2:09 PM

this correlates with unit 4 political geography because it is showing a nation state.

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How Google represents disputed borders between countries

How Google represents disputed borders between countries | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
INTERNATIONAL borders are often tricky to chart on maps. Tangible topographic features can be pinned down by satellite imagery but the boundaries between many states...

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 2014 9:10 AM

How does politics affect map-making? 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 8, 2014 12:36 PM

unit 4

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 13, 2014 3:17 PM

Google is always a step ahead of any other online page so it is not surprising that Google have some countries in dispute because they can see people can see the political status of a country in Google map but that might change the way we see and think about Google and countries with dispute. Google or the Internet will always be a good help for people to be able see what is happening between country's borders.

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What is a part of the United States?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
pascal simoens's curator insight, August 6, 2014 5:58 PM

qui m'a dit un jour que l'"Europe, c'est compliqué?"...

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:54 PM

APHG-U4

CHS AP Human Geography / Beth Gehle & Amy Rossello's curator insight, August 17, 2014 5:28 PM

Use in Political Geo unit, or for Canada and US region

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

China publishes new map

China publishes new map | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
China has published a new map of the entire country including the islands in the South China Sea (West Philippine Sea) in order to "better show" its territorial claim over the region.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
James Hobson's curator insight, November 21, 2014 7:12 PM

(East Asia topic 2)

The aggressive stance which China is seen as taking towards its oceanic claims can be tied closely with its lack of a mainland frontier. Having no where else to go westward, the only other option is apparently to go very-outward into the south and east. The fact that there is virtually no land in this region is a mute point due to the huge resources which lie under the ocean's surface.

   This action taken by China seems to eerily represent actions of the United States around 70 years ago; once the western frontier had been settled and firmly claimed, the desire to continue expansion can be seen through the U.S.'s involvement with Hawaii, the Philippines, Guam, Midway Island, and the like. Though there may have been the use of war as a reason to do this in the case of America, the nationalistic desire for expansion can clearly be seen. European powers, which have especially been short on land frontiers, certainly have exhibited the same traits in history.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 22, 2014 9:46 PM

This new map of China, not surprisingly produced by China, may not look any different than the maps you see now, until you notice the dashed lines in the South China Sea.  These lines are meant to outline the area of Chinese territory.  They have also claimed, which has turned up as false, that they had ancient claim to this area.  This wouldn't be such a big deal except the fact that there are oil reserves in the area in which China has marked its claim.  Not only would this specific area become a new resource for China but also the international waters that they have greatly increased for themselves.  With China's new claim to this area in the South China Sea they have expanded the area that they control as well as gaining a great deal of international water that they would have drilling rights to.  This has neighboring countries up in arms for good reason.  China is trying to take over land that isn't theirs with no validity solely for the oil claims.  Although they are controlling the area in which they have staked a claim on, the courts could soon make sure this isn't happening.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:50 PM

The new map published by the Chinese government is a clear message of what they feel are their territorial boundaries. In areas that are contested between China and other countries, the map makes a bold claim that these areas belong to China. Chinese activities in these disputed areas match up with the attitude conveyed by this map.

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

African borders

African borders | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

"About the history of the creation of Africa borders and debates about African borders."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Darleana McHenry's curator insight, June 26, 2014 7:33 AM

I thought that this was interesting and decided to share it.

 

Beatrice Sarni's curator insight, July 7, 2014 3:36 AM

always an interesting discussion...

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:50 PM

APHG-U4

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

India and Pakistan Reunited

"It’s rare that a video from a brand will spark any real emotion--but a new spot from Google India is so powerful, and so honest to the product, that it’s a testament not only to the deft touch of the ad team that put it together, but to the strength of Google’s current offering."--Forbes


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 2:36 PM

This ad not only demonstrates how Google is allowing for people all over the world to come together, it is also an expertly devised commentary on a real life event that happened in this part of the world, and the emotional implications that it caused. The video shows how the grandchildren of two men were able to utilize Google in order to bring the two friends together after years apart. The two gentlemen were once good friends, but had not seen each other since the Pakistani-Indian conflict. The conflict tore families and friends apart, and remains today as a sensitive topic to those affected by the event. 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 7:33 PM

This video is a perfect example of ho, especially in this day and age, the world can be brought closer together. In the video, two childhood friends are reunited after years of being apart, due to the conflicts go on their country. This shows one of the positive of the technology we have access to today, being able to bring together old friends by using new ways is great. This video also goes to show that even though the world is an enormous place, it can be made smaller.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 2:38 AM

This video is reminiscent of the families separated during the Korean war recently being allowed to visit one another. While tensions still exist between India and Pakistan many have begun to come to peace with the concept their nations won't be unified under either's rule. Because of this cooling of tensions families and friends are now able to see each other again after years without seeing them. Of course this is a Google commercial so the sincerity is somewhat diminished because of it's origins.

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Take This State And Shove It: The New Secession Movement

Take This State And Shove It: The New Secession Movement | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
Residents of rural areas feel shut out of their states' politics, so why not create their own?

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Heather Ramsey's curator insight, November 18, 2013 2:25 PM

On election day this year, several Colorado counties voted on whether to secede from Colorado and create a new state. Many of the counties voted in favor of the idea. (See the link below for more info on the Colorado secession movement.) This is not the first time groups of Americans have considered (and voted on) breaking away from their state. When political issues come up and decisions are made by the government and/or the people, some get their way and others do not. The article explains one way that some people have decided to take action when they do not feel their interests are being served.

 

BONUS for my students:

1) What steps do you think should be taken before people consider seceding from their state?  

2) What are some possible pros and cons of breaking away from a state to create a new one?  

3) Hypothetically speaking, what would it take for you to want to create a new state?

 

Here is the link to the article about Colorado's secession movement:

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory/colorado-rural-voters-approve-secession-idea-20850962

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:43 PM

Some states urban and rural areas have had differences and beliefs when it comes to politics. For example Virginia and West Virginia have had their differences and this is what has caused them to seperate. If every state did this there would be too much craziness because im sure each state would have a different belief and nobody would agree on anything. 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 1, 2014 7:57 PM

This article is about segments of California, Colorado, and Oregon wanting to separate and become their own states so their voices can be heard in Congress.

 

If, hypothetically, new states were formed out of existing ones this kind of gerrymandering would likely only lead to even more new states. It might even lead to a secession arms race to gain more Democrat and Republican seats in the Senate. With so many new states, it could lead to increased division, with no Democrat or Republican wanting to set foot in an opposition’s state. In the long run though, political affiliations do eventually change and we would have a precedent analogous to attempting to take the ball home when the other kids don't want to play the same game as you, which is not how a democratic republic works.

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

It's Complicated: 5 Puzzling International Borders

It's Complicated: 5 Puzzling International Borders | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

"Most of us think of international borders as invisible, but clear-cut lines: stand on one side, and you’re in one country; stand on the other, you’re in another country.  But here’s a list of five international borders that, for one reason or another, are not quite that simple."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 12, 2013 9:20 AM

This article is in dire needs of some maps, but it still provides 5 intriguing case studies of borders and chunks of territory that defy normal categorization.


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty.

Caterin Victor's curator insight, July 13, 2013 12:53 PM

It  is  Puzzling, but  every  human  being  chose to live in a normal,  happy  and  free  country, in a  Democratie,  if  possible.

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:20 PM

These borders and boundaries indicate something that I thought of while rewatching Independence Day (the Smith/Goldblum flick from '96)...  If we make a mess, and destroy this planet, aliens wouldn't want it.  The land that no one wants, is probably wanted by someone in reality... I am a fervent believer in aliens, and spend my free time diving into attempts to solve my quandary about the higher questions of the universe.  I think that the area that no one wants, everyone wants.  Unlike state boundaries in the US, planets are divided as separate entities from other planets, but grouped in solar systems, galaxies, asteroid belts, etc... I can't wait for the day some pompous fool gets on the bridge of a starship from Earth and sits in the captain's chair and says "Lieutenant, take us to Sector ----- (so and so)"... We will have moved up from the United States and Canada to the United Sectors of Galaxies!  And that little bit of land that 'no one wants,' everyone actually wants... same with planets.  Terraforming will allow those unsightly balls of fury that float around a star to become the most inhabitable of them all!  I wonder where these things will stop... or if it keeps going to larger sectors, endlessly? Well, we will likely encounter other species with territorial claims... play nice, America!  Or the Aliens will pop out of your stomach.  Though there are some politicians now that seem to have popped out of someone's stomach, I think the threat is more domestic while territory disputes occur nowadays, as it is humans arguing with humans, but it will increase when the Martians come to claim what is theirs.

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Conflict Zone

The Conflict Zone | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

"In a new series of four eight-minute videos, National Geographic Emerging Explorer Aziz Abu Sarah is a cultural educator working to build relationships between Israelis and Palestinians in Jerusalem and throughout Israel. In this series of four eight-minute videos, Abu Sarah meets with people from both sides of the conflict in order to better understand and communicate how this international dispute impacts their everyday lives."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Enclaves

Enclaves | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
A website that examines the geographical enclaves of the world

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Alejandro Restrepo's comment, February 13, 2013 6:18 PM
Very interesting!
Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, February 14, 2013 7:32 AM
Mondialisation et frontières... et sur cette carte mon imminente destination de vacances: l'enclave omanaise de Musandam.
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 14, 2013 4:46 PM

Enclaves of the world HUGGERS....review!

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Cartography And Conflict

Cartography And Conflict | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
A newly issued Chinese passport featuring a map that lays claim to disputed territory with several neighboring countries is only the latest case of cartographic aggression.

 

"Maps, like statistics, can lie — or at least tell only one side of the story. As often as not, they can belie the level of actual governmental control or the ethnic and social realities on the ground. And competing views over 'who owns what' invariably fuel nationalistic fervor."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 15, 2013 9:22 PM

Maps can lie, or at least only tell one side of a story. China sparked an international uproar over their new passports that features a map of China. The map includes territories claimed by India, Vietnam, the Philippines and Taiwan.

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Africa, Uncolonized: A Detailed Look at an Alternate Continent

Africa, Uncolonized: A Detailed Look at an Alternate Continent | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
What if the Black Plague had killed off almost all Europeans? Then the Reconquista never happens. Spain and Portugal don't kickstart Europe's colonization of other continents. And this is what Africa might have looked like.

 

Tags: Africa, colonialism, borders, historical, map.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 13, 2014 2:21 PM

Africa without the Europe's colonization could have led Latin America to a different development. Maybe less countries or more, who knows.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:37 AM

It is fascinating to see how different the political borders of Africa would have been without European colonial influence. One thing this map predicts is that if the Europeans would not have pushed into Africa, Arab and Islamic influences would have filled the void. The huge number of independent states or regions on this map show how large the continent is and how many different ethnic and religious groups there are.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:59 PM

I sometimes do question, what would Africa look like today if it weren't colonized by the Europeans. Before the discovery of Africa, Africa was a land that was dominated by wealthy kingdoms that spent most of its time conquering other countries. With the ideology that Africa was a land flowing with milk and honey inhabited by uncivilized human beings, conquering Africa seemed like the ideal thing for European super powers to do in order to exploit the lands natural resource at no cost. If Africa was not colonized by Europeans, Africans would have more access to their own natural resources, and the instability that most of African countries face today would most likely not be in existence.

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
These maps are crucial for understanding the region's history, its present, and some of the most important stories there today.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, November 30, 2014 9:53 PM

Unit 1 Nature and Perspectives of Geography

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, February 8, 3:41 AM

A great collection of maps - although because they are on a pop-culture website, it might be worth downloading and then referencing them in class. 

Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, February 9, 9:26 AM

Seth Dixon - the teacher that sent this article at the first place - assess a very sound comment about the use of maps as tools of comprehenssion of the real world. I love maps, but can t avoid to be worried about what he is saying, so I recommend a thougthful reading of his statements.

(Seth Dixon - el profesor que envió este artículo en primer lugar - hace un profundo comentario acerca del empleo de mapas como herramietas de comprensión del mundo real. Yo amo los mapas, pero no puedo evitar preocuparme por lo que (Dixon) señala, así que recomiendo una reflexiva lectura de sus planteamientos.)  

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Where Do Borders Need to Be Redrawn? - Room for Debate

Where Do Borders Need to Be Redrawn? - Room for Debate | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
What parts of the world should rethink their maps? Why and how?

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 7, 2014 11:28 AM

Maps are always changing as a new nation gets added and old lines cease to make sense. Territory is claimed and reclaimed.  This series of seven articles in the New York Times explores regional examples of how borders impacts places from a variety of scholarly perspectives.  Together, these article challenge student to reconsider the world map and to conceptualize conflicts within a spatial context.

 

Tags: bordersmapping, political, territoriality, sovereignty.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, July 16, 2014 10:53 AM

WOW, some really interesting thoughtdebate points here! very very unit 4

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:05 PM

APHG-U4

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

China's territorial claims

One of the geography videos embedded in this interactive map: http://bit.ly/KDY6C2


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 20, 2014 8:44 AM
The People's Republic of China is beginning to frighten its neighbors by flexing its growing power in regards to territorial claims. While China chose to keep to its self during the major periods of world colonialism, it is now considering the benefits of enlarging its borders. Since China is much larger with a more powerful economy and military than its neighbors, countries such as Malaysia and Indonesia risk a lot by fighting China's claims. Oil plays in the South China Sea are causing multiple countries to argue over territory. Whether or not China is willing to spark war within the region to claim natural resources crucial to its growth as a world power is yet to be seen.
Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 3:28 PM

China has a history of imperialism and expansion, and their recent economic gains show it may be considering taking steps in that direction again. The country is in border disputes in at least three different regions with seven countries or more. China appears very bold by claiming desire the control an area that is already disputed between five countries, and is much further away from China than it is the other countries.

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:24 PM

China is imposing these territorial claims as it is a benefit for their economy. That being said this can cause geo-political tensions that can have detrimental effects on how one country trades with another. 

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Walled World

Walled World | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
We chart the routes of, and reasons for, the barriers which are once again dividing populations

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 14, 2014 9:48 PM

It appears India is constructing a 2,500-mile long fence around its neighboring country Bangladesh. The barbed wire fence may have been built due to that fact India has one of the largest populations in the world and they do not want the struggling people of Bangladesh to enter their country. Also, areas around the fence are becoming dangerous, with more than 1,000 people killed by border patrol and criminals. There are not many jobs in Bangladesh and the people are having trouble finding clean drinkable water. Lastly, the people may be fleeing into India hoping to find work and an improved lifestyle.  

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 2014 6:51 PM

Walls are a symbol of political boundaries and motives, usually intended to keep certain people in or out. This website in particular clearly highlights this idea in human geography as it explores the various walls that mark our landscape and thus contribute to changing policies and borders. Walls can also affect the landscape, not just mark it, as an effect of asserting either political dominance or border policies, as best seen by the resulting environmental results that come from it and the displacement of people (as seen on Palestinian-Israeli border). 

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 2014 1:06 AM

We looked at this map in class its really interesting nd weird to see all the dividing walls in the world and to discover ones youve never seen before.

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

So you want to form your own state? It may take a while

So you want to form your own state? It may take a while | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

Voters in five Colorado counties said on Tuesday they want to form their own state.  But the breakaway regions face almost impossible constitutional and political obstacles. The North Colorado movement supporters claim that their counties have little in common with more urbanized parts of the state, and they are unhappy with state-wide laws about gun control and energy standards. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 17, 2013 6:26 AM

movements to secceed and create their own state is a popular idea but will not be easy because of the political and cultural implications. Already exisiting states would become smaller and turn into smaller autonmous states. in the long run it may be more to manage because we would not more representatives and senators to represent this additional state. THe independant states may have more states but could become a headache for the 50 original states we already have.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 10:27 AM

Theres an old saying that fits well with this article and its "if its not broke dont fix it" theres no major problem with having some demographicial differences in a state. Sure Nor Cal and So Cal may be nothing alike but that doesnt mean they need to officially seperate. Thanks to the constitution the seperation of a state/ forming of a state isnt a easy proccess, because if it was there would be endless amounts of states in this country because no 2 people share the exact same opinion.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, September 10, 2014 3:18 PM

This article was very insightful and thought provoking. The idea of having 51 states in our country does not frequent in conversations,however it is surprising that it is not a more popularized idea. In our country there are many states that for lack of better termonolgy are too "big". States like California,Texas and Alaska are three that come to mind. In the idea of government and governing it seems somewhat impossible to keep a large mass of citizens organized. I can see in some cirrcumstances where citizens  would want to have more direct connection with their government instead of being generalized with individuals from the same state but different environments.

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Exclaves and Sovereignty

Exclaves and Sovereignty | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

"Prime Minister David Cameron is 'seriously concerned' about the escalation of tensions on the border between Spain and the British territory of Gibraltar."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
karenpinney's curator insight, August 12, 2013 5:13 AM

Relationships between Britain and Spain.

megan b clement's curator insight, October 13, 2013 12:37 AM

"The video explains about Spain and Gibraltar and how they have feuded back and forth with one another and their borders for some time now. Gibraltar has made a articfical reef to mess with the Spainish fisherman and SPain has made travel to Gibraltar nearly impossible and dreadfully long for tourists. Spain understands how essential tourism is to their economy. Until they are able to come to an agreement thei matter is only going to intenisfy more and worsen."

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 2014 10:55 AM

I was unaware that the UK owned this part of Gibraltar.  It seems like a throwback to the UK’s naval policies of the past that they would still to control this point of entry into the Mediterranean.  It will be interesting to see how this will be resolved.  As it is a dispute between two countries that are both part of the EU. 

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Bizarre Borders


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 5, 2014 8:45 PM

This video shows how political geography does not always match up perfectly with physical geography, showing how the "no-touching zone" between the US and Canada has led to several border irregularities. It's very interesting to see how a seemingly straight border on a map is actually an odd and irregular jagged line that defines the political boundary. 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 29, 6:31 PM

Craziest thing I've ever seen!  The poor kids on Robert's Island that has to cross through Canada to go to school.  I think it's crazy that the borders were defined when they didn't even have a complete map.  Taking a guess obviously didn't work out.  It seems very difficult to define a border.  

WILBERT DE JESUS's curator insight, February 12, 6:39 PM

Sometimes borders between frendly neighbours like Canada and USA are less protected than borders between countries with conflicts.

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

East Asia's maritime disputes

East Asia's maritime disputes | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
A race for energy resources makes unresolved territorial disputes more dangerous in both North-East and South-East Asia

Tags: borders, political, conflict, water, China, Japan, East Asia.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
megan b clement's curator insight, October 13, 2013 12:43 AM

" Asia is willing to go to war with small islands in order to gain full control and rights of the ocean borders. China is very assertive and aggressive. They even go to the extreme as to use boats to hit Vietnamese and Phillipino ships to show that the ocean is theirs. It is all because countries or islands with a coastline are to have rights over their land and 200 nautical miles as well. It is just becoming a problem because how do you evenly distribute or differentiate who's is who's."

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:48 PM

I couldn't view this content. Its "cookies" were unable to read my computer.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 1:04 PM

Oil resources in the South China Sea are fueling territorial disputes over small islands and territorial waters. China, in order to claim these oil plays for itself, is claiming islands all over the sea. Extending its EEZ will ensure these oil plays. Many of these islands are no more than coral atolls, but China is arguing that they belong to it because of its measures to develop some of these islands. One resort islands and weather stations are being constructed in order to provide some sort of legitimate claim to these places. Also, by claiming these islands and expanding the EEZ, China is trying to claim other countries' EEZs as its own. While China is the powerhouse of the region, many fear that land grabs may turn into military action. 

 

As long as the world is reliant on fossil fuels, territorial disputes will continue and possibly grow in number. Dependency on a non-renewable resource will eventually lead to more regional and global arguments. 

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Roots of the Mali Crisis

January 19, 2013—The West African nation of Mali is making headlines after a wave of French military actions on Islamic extremist groups now controlling the northern part of the country. National Geographic Senior Writer Peter Gwin has...

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Araceli Vilarrasa Cunillé's curator insight, February 6, 2013 6:37 AM

La crisi propera no es deixa fer prou atenció als canvis geopolítics a l' Africa.

Emma Lafleur's curator insight, March 29, 2013 3:32 PM

   This video clip that is great for learning not only about the situation in Mali, but how history leads to the events of today and how much one country can affect another country.

   When Europe colonized  Africa they created borders that separated groups of people that should have stayed together, and they put different ethnic groups together that should have been separated. With this alone comes great conflict because ethnic groups and neighboring tribes that have had conflicts for years now have to operate under the same government somehow and no one is ever really happy so conflicts arise.

    Also, the Arab Spring broke out which brought on all these new ideas and opportunities for the people to revolt and change their country, and some of the people left Libya after the fall of Gadaffi and went to Mali bringing their weapons and anger with them. All of these events led to the Mali crisis today, and it is interesting to see how much one country affects another country and as a history major I am greatly interested in how the history of the country brings about the events of today.

Al Picozzi's comment, July 18, 2013 12:15 PM
The borders were randomly drawn without taking culture, language, beliefs of the native populations etc into account. However drawing borders along ethnic lines didn't work in Europe after WWI. Alot of ethnic minorities were in countires that did not feel welcome. That was one reason for WWII
Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Israel and Palestine

Watch this Jewish Voice for Peace 6 minute mini-primer about why Israelis and Palestinians are fighting..

This video from the Jewish Voice for Peace has a more politically motivated angle than most of the resources that I post on this site, but I feel that they do justice to both sides as well as the truth. In a simple way it lays out the roots of many of the problems in the region with historic and geographic perspectives.

Tags: Israel, Palestine, conflict, political, borders.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 7:34 PM

This video is a really helpful, simplified explanation of the fighting in Israel that is fiercely complicated and has gone on for decades now with one repressed group repressing another. If I ever need to explain the struggle to students, this video would be an excellent introduction.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 27, 2014 9:40 PM

This was a very understated and poignant  video. The simplicity and directness was very powerful. It was very interesting to see this conflict, that had taken place in this area presented in such a way. Around the time of WWII about 7% of this area  was occupied by Jewish people, currently they occupy almost 100%.  I commend the Jewish Voice for showing this conflict in a different light. Showing that both sides may have been in the wrong .

James Hobson's curator insight, October 28, 2014 9:58 AM

(Africa topic 1)

{{Note: Some topics and locations pertain to multiple geographic regions (i.e. northern Africa, the Middle East, and southwestern Asia, and topics in different regions may refer to the same country or location because of this.}}

I found it interesting to watch a video that comes from an implied anti-Israel standpoint, especially since the organization which made this video is called the Jewish Voice for Peace. Though there has always been disagreement as to who should occupy some of the most hallowed land in the world, it seems that the Israeli-Palestinian conflict stems more out of the UN repartitioning plan. Regardless of clashing religions and cultures, it does seem unfair that a minority of people control the majority of land and resources. This makes me wonder why exactly the UN made the Israeli state there: was is purely because of the Jewish religion associations?, or because no other country wanted to absorb the increasing number of refugees?, or because the UN wanted to gain a stronghold in the Middle East?, or perhaps a combination of all of the above?