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The Next America

The Next America | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
Demographic transformations are dramas in slow motion. America is in the midst of two right now. Our population is becoming majority non-white at the same time a record share is going gray.

Via Seth Dixon
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Character Minutes's curator insight, April 20, 11:52 AM

Very interesting chart of how the demographics of U.S. Is changing.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 24, 11:25 AM

unit 2

CB New Hire Onboarding's curator insight, April 25, 9:35 AM

"The demographic shifts in the United States are transforming the cultural fabric of the country and this interactive feature from the Pew Research Center explores some of these changes.  Interracial marriage, declining fertility rates, migration, economic opportunities and politics are just some of the issues that can be seen in these excellent populations pyramids, charts, videos and graphs." - Seth Dixon 

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Linguistic Diversity at Home

Linguistic Diversity at Home | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

"Counties where at least 10 percent of people speak a language other than English at home."


Via Seth Dixon
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elianna sosa paulino's curator insight, September 10, 2013 10:48 AM

While this is ostensibly a map that would be great for a cultural geography unit, I'm also thinking about the spatial patterns that created this map.  What current or historical migrations account for some of the patterns visible here?  What would a map like this look like it it were produced 50 years ago?  Why are Vermont and West Virginia the only states without a county with over 10% of the population that speak another language at home? 

 

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 5, 2013 2:34 PM

The presence of large numbers of people that speak languages other than English at home occurs on the east and west coasts of the U.S., but largely in the south and western areas of the U.S..  In high school we used to have discussions about how there were many immigrants coming into the U.S. from or through Mexico.  With migration comes cultural diffusion, as the people coming into the United States bring their language and many other cultural elements of their country of origin with them.  I know there are certain neighborhoods in cities in Rhode Island where most people that I see on the street are speaking Spanish.  I have a relative that has married an immigrant from Guatemala, and she learned that the North East coast of the U.S. Is where many people from Central America move to- often in groups that settle as communities to help each other.  I can understand that it is essential to live near people that speak your language, and it makes sense that their strength and comfort in numbers is also a way of having a "home away from home."  Being the area of the world on the southern land border of the U.S., and that Central America consists mainly of Spanish speakers, it fills in the Southern areas of the U.S. with people that speak a language other than English.  The coasts overall can be explained as being populated by people that speak languages other than English at home because they contain ports of travel and trade, and are points where many flights from other countries would land and drop off travelers and migrants.  That and beautiful ocean views make the coasts a great place for foreigners to settle and live.  These pull factors are likely influential reasons for people to relocate to the areas on the map.

Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 10, 2013 11:02 PM

This map does not bring many surprises.  Places where there are a lot of Spanish speaking families are present in places where many Spanish people immigrate to, along the Mexican border and the southern tip of Florida, where Cuba is close by.  One interesting thing about the French areas seen in Louisiana is that their version of French is a regional dialect. Not only is their a cluster of French speaking families, but they are all speaking a language native to the region.  It is very surprising that there are not as many French speaking families along the Canadien border.

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Quebec Voters Say 'Non' to Separatists

Quebec Voters Say 'Non' to Separatists | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

"Quebec voters gave a resounding no to the prospects of holding a third referendum on independence from Canada, handing the main separatist party in the French-speaking province one of its worst electoral defeats ever."  

 

Quebec, which is 80 percent French-speaking, has plenty of autonomy already. The province of 8.1 million sets its own income tax, has its own immigration policy favoring French speakers, and has legislation prioritizing French over English.  But many Quebecois have long dreamed of an independent Quebec, as they at times haven't felt respected and have worried about the survival of their language in English-speaking North America.

 

Tags: Canada, political, devolution.


Via Seth Dixon
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Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2:14 PM

Quebecois have voted against seperating from Canada and becoming a sovereign French Speaking state. Even though the Quebecois was to keep their French language and their own culture, they still voted against become a sovereign independent state but keep their strict French laws. Quebec is an interesting example of how movement affects place by how their immigrants have changed their French landscape forcing them to enact laws.

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Bizarre Borders


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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, January 30, 7:29 PM

Glad to see two countries like Canada and America can get along over these bizarre borders. I think many countries in the Middle East would fight over those small pieces of land. I think we avoid violence over these borders because we have such a good relationship with Canada.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 1, 7:28 PM

The video highlights a bunch irregularities along the US/Canadian border. Among them, the zigzag 49th not-so-parallel, a small island which is actually a disputed territory, and another US island which is far closer to Canada than it is Washington state causing high school students to have to cross international borders four times to attend school.



This is an interesting video in that it shows how even in the recent past how difficult it was to clearly and conclusively delineate the border between the US and Canada. The fact that there is still a disputed island between two very friendly nations. This only makes it more clear why much older, less friendly nations would have heated disputes over territory.

 

Mrs. B's curator insight, February 15, 9:46 AM

Did you know the geometric boundary between US and Canada (the longest border in the world) is also a physical border? Check it out.