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40 Maps That Explain The Middle East

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
These maps are crucial for understanding the region's history, its present, and some of the most important stories there today.

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Sharrock's curator insight, August 5, 5:30 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

Titles like the one for this article, 40 maps that explain the Middle East, are becoming increasingly common for internet articles.  They helps us feel that we can explain all of the world's complexities and make sense of highly dynamic situations.  While we can all agree that maps are great analytical tools that can be very persuasive, sometimes we can pretend that they are the end all, be all for any situation.  Maps can also be used to show how something that we thought was simple can be much complex and nuanced than we had previously imagined, as demonstrated by this article, 15 Maps that Don't Explain the Middle East at All.  Both perspectives have their place (and both articles are quite insightful). Not connected to the Middle East, but East Asia, this article entitled Lies, Damned Lies and Maps continues the discussion of maps, truth and perception.  

 

Tags: MiddleEast, conflict, political, borders, colonialism, devolution,historical, mapping

Linda Denty's curator insight, August 5, 3:42 PM

As Seth Dixson says, maps only tell a part of a story, but this may assist as part of an overall understanding of the history of the area.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, August 5, 5:10 PM

Some of the histories in maps is helpful in realising the complexities of the issues.

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Interactives: War and Refugees

Interactives: War and Refugees | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

UNHCR has been attempting to count the world's refugees since it was created. If you want to find out which years resulted in the worst displacement, which were the biggest countries of origin and which were the biggest countries of asylum, use the interactive map.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 27, 2013 7:02 AM

This interactive on refugees is especially timely, given that the Syrian civil war has created refugee situations in many of the neighboring countries.  One of my favorite elements of the Guardian's interactive is that they provide the raw data, so students can create their own maps with the same high quality data.  Equally important, this interactive shows the regional power bases of all the various factions of the Syrian rebellion that is seeking to overthrow the Assad regime.  The political conflict has huge demographic implications.    

Tags: refugees, Syria, migration, conflict, political, MiddleEast, war.

Emilie Kochert's curator insight, September 8, 2013 1:25 AM

via gduboz

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Fields of Green Spring up in Saudi Arabia

Fields of Green Spring up in Saudi Arabia | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
Saudi Arabia is drilling for a resource possibly more precious than oil by tapping hidden reserves of water in the Syrian Desert.

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 8:53 AM

These images show the growth of farmland in Saudi Arabia. With little to no rainfall annually, these fields are irrigated by mining for water deep in underground aquifers. This investment into agriculture by Saudi Arabia, an oil rich country which can buy the food it needs, suggests that the nation is concerned with the production of the food it buys or the sustainability of its oil wealth. Problematic, though, would be the long-term agricultural plans as the method being used for acquiring irrigation water is only sustainable for 50 years.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 2, 5:30 PM

Saudi Arabia may have an abundance of oil, however, they do not have an abundance of water and fertile soil. Saudi Arabia could import plenty of food with the profits they receive from oil production. It appears they are attempting to be more self-sufficient and trying to invest in agriculture, with the hopes of growing their own food and other crops. This country will not have oil forever, and it appears they are planning for the future.  

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 9:56 AM

In any society, survival trumps economy.  In this case water and oil are the respective area of focus in Saudi Arabia.  Saudi Arabia has been tapping into aquifers under the Arabian desert in order to grow food.  This is a move of independence;  as the NAFTA agreement may allow the Americas to be energy-independent, Saudi Arabia needs a backup plan to become  a little more independent itself as their oil money decreases.  However, this water source is limited and is ecologically very unsound since the desert climate is not good for water and plants.

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The Archipelago of Eastern Palestine

The Archipelago of Eastern Palestine | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

The shape of a state can greatly impact the political cohesion of a country as well as it's economic viability.  While this is obviously a fictitious map, it draws our attention to the logistic difficulties that confront Palestine with the Israelis controlling crucial transportation access points and corridors.   

 

Questions to Ponder:  How is the a 'persuasive map?' What are some of the geographic impacts of this fragmentation on Palestine? For Israel?

 

Tags: cartography, MiddleEast, political, states, territoriality, unit 4 political.


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Melissa Burr's comment, October 10, 2012 7:13 AM
This map is persuasive because it does not show the usual Palestine. This map is fragmented and the geographic impacts it shows are the routes taken in at leisure for maritime activity and also shows the urban and popluated areas in the past and how how the sraelites impact those areas.
Matthew Jones's comment, October 10, 2012 7:16 AM
The reason this is a persuasive map in my opinion is that this map does a very good job of allowing the reader to understand the focus in which it intends to present. information key which it offers is crucial to the map b/ it help the reader better understand and analyze this map in its entirety. as far As the second question unfortunately I am not very knowledgeable as far as the impact his map as on palestiine or isreal.
Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 10, 2012 8:24 AM
This map is unique and not typical. The way that Palestine's land is severed and each transportation access point is clearly shown and highlighted, makes this map's data very persuasive and impactful. This map examines the Israelis' control of the land.
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Global Oil Reserves

Global Oil Reserves | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

Who has the oil? http://pic.twitter.com/7Njc7OD8rw


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Richard Lloyd Thomas's curator insight, March 13, 8:22 PM

Inequalities exist as well

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 26, 3:03 PM

This graph depcits Sauda Arabia with the most oil reserves in at 262 Billion barrels and in second place coming in at 132 billion barrels is Iran. These barrels are a very important assett to not only the US but to the world. This is why gas is so expensive because most of the time the US has to import it from differnt countries in order to obtain the amount we need for resources and mostly everything is based on oil as far as some fossil fuels are concerned. 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 14, 2:22 PM

India is demonstrated at 2,000-2,999 in range of bbps. This amount of oil reserves is very important to the revenue of the country and the way that the poeple survive, natural resources such as oil are a very important and costly resource to obtain. Having oil in your country helps with trade and revenue income and trade routes are compiled which helps the economy.

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The Conflict Zone

The Conflict Zone | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

"In a new series of four eight-minute videos, National Geographic Emerging Explorer Aziz Abu Sarah is a cultural educator working to build relationships between Israelis and Palestinians in Jerusalem and throughout Israel. In this series of four eight-minute videos, Abu Sarah meets with people from both sides of the conflict in order to better understand and communicate how this international dispute impacts their everyday lives."


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Israel and Palestine

Watch this Jewish Voice for Peace 6 minute mini-primer about why Israelis and Palestinians are fighting..

This video from the Jewish Voice for Peace has a more politically motivated angle than most of the resources that I post on this site, but I feel that they do justice to both sides as well as the truth. In a simple way it lays out the roots of many of the problems in the region with historic and geographic perspectives.

Tags: Israel, Palestine, conflict, political, borders.


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Seth Dixon's comment, November 29, 2012 6:51 PM
I must admit, I did struggle on whether to post it or not. In the video the use of term 'indigenous people' to refer to the Palestinians bothered me as did a few other references, but I did feel it tried to be accurate even if their political perspective was obvious.
I would most certainly be open to posting something more pro-Israeli since I'm not trying to advocate a particular point or push a perspective, but I did think it was a good, is somewhat flawed resource. It's near impossible to find anything without bias so I decided that sharing some flawed sources is better than not sharing any on a pretty weighty topic.
Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, January 8, 2013 10:16 AM

This video from the Jewish Voice for Peace has a more politically motivated angle than most of the resources that I post on this site, but I feel that they do justice to both sides as well as the truth.  In a simple way it lays out the roots of many of the problems in the region with historic and geographic perspectives.   

 

Tags: Israel, Palestine, conflict, political, borders.

Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 4:34 PM

This video is a really helpful, simplified explanation of the fighting in Israel that is fiercely complicated and has gone on for decades now with one repressed group repressing another. If I ever need to explain the struggle to students, this video would be an excellent introduction.