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The colourful propaganda of Xinjiang

The colourful propaganda of Xinjiang | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

"China is in the midst of a crackdown on what it describes as 'terrorism driven by religious extremism'. The campaign is focused on the western province of Xinjiang, home to China's Uighur ethnic minority who are predominantly Muslim."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 13, 3:11 PM

China does not have a good track record of dealing with ethnic and religious minorities and the murals that can be seen in Xinjiang are a testament to that fact.  This has led to many Muslims in Western China being attracted to more radical ideas.  While I certainly don't condone radicalism nor China's heavy-handed tactics, I am fascinated by the cultural messages that are strategically being placed in the landscape to influence the politics and culture of the region.  


Tags: political, conflictgovernance, China, East Asia, religion, culture, Islam, landscape.

Bharat Employment's curator insight, January 26, 11:34 PM

www.bharatemployment.com

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China's territorial claims

One of the geography videos embedded in this interactive map: http://bit.ly/KDY6C2


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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 20, 2014 8:44 AM
The People's Republic of China is beginning to frighten its neighbors by flexing its growing power in regards to territorial claims. While China chose to keep to its self during the major periods of world colonialism, it is now considering the benefits of enlarging its borders. Since China is much larger with a more powerful economy and military than its neighbors, countries such as Malaysia and Indonesia risk a lot by fighting China's claims. Oil plays in the South China Sea are causing multiple countries to argue over territory. Whether or not China is willing to spark war within the region to claim natural resources crucial to its growth as a world power is yet to be seen.
Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 3:28 PM

China has a history of imperialism and expansion, and their recent economic gains show it may be considering taking steps in that direction again. The country is in border disputes in at least three different regions with seven countries or more. China appears very bold by claiming desire the control an area that is already disputed between five countries, and is much further away from China than it is the other countries.

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:24 PM

China is imposing these territorial claims as it is a benefit for their economy. That being said this can cause geo-political tensions that can have detrimental effects on how one country trades with another. 

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East Asia's maritime disputes

East Asia's maritime disputes | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
A race for energy resources makes unresolved territorial disputes more dangerous in both North-East and South-East Asia

Tags: borders, political, conflict, water, China, Japan, East Asia.


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megan b clement's curator insight, October 13, 2013 12:43 AM

" Asia is willing to go to war with small islands in order to gain full control and rights of the ocean borders. China is very assertive and aggressive. They even go to the extreme as to use boats to hit Vietnamese and Phillipino ships to show that the ocean is theirs. It is all because countries or islands with a coastline are to have rights over their land and 200 nautical miles as well. It is just becoming a problem because how do you evenly distribute or differentiate who's is who's."

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:48 PM

I couldn't view this content. Its "cookies" were unable to read my computer.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 1:04 PM

Oil resources in the South China Sea are fueling territorial disputes over small islands and territorial waters. China, in order to claim these oil plays for itself, is claiming islands all over the sea. Extending its EEZ will ensure these oil plays. Many of these islands are no more than coral atolls, but China is arguing that they belong to it because of its measures to develop some of these islands. One resort islands and weather stations are being constructed in order to provide some sort of legitimate claim to these places. Also, by claiming these islands and expanding the EEZ, China is trying to claim other countries' EEZs as its own. While China is the powerhouse of the region, many fear that land grabs may turn into military action. 

 

As long as the world is reliant on fossil fuels, territorial disputes will continue and possibly grow in number. Dependency on a non-renewable resource will eventually lead to more regional and global arguments. 

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Shanghai: 1990 vs. 2010

Shanghai: 1990 vs. 2010 | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

Globalization has hit...hard and fast. 


Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO, Jose Soto, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 2014 6:35 PM

Shanghai has transformed and globalized so quickly in the last twenty years that it doesn't even look like that same place. Skies that were once seen are now blocked by skyscrapers. Buildings that still remain are overpowered and do not stand out like they once did.

James Hobson's curator insight, November 21, 2014 7:02 PM

(East Asia topic 1)

Present-day Shanghai appears as if it could pass as New York city to the untrained eye. These photos show how globalization affects a city physically, but other aspects are impacted by globalization as well. Many megacities find themselves growing away from their origins: ways of life, employment opportunities, languages & dialects, ethnic background, and cultural traditions all find themselves fending off the incoming competition. However, there is a bright side: in many cases that which is lost from or changed in on place can find itself thriving in another - the same mechanism which brought about the original change in the first place. One could argue that 'Chinatowns' and 'Little Italy's are common examples, just as Western traits are transforming Eastern cities.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 1:25 PM

100 years ago this type of development would have taken generations to complete. In the post industrial age we can see that in a mere 20 years a city can be completely transformed.

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China publishes new map

China publishes new map | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
China has published a new map of the entire country including the islands in the South China Sea (West Philippine Sea) in order to "better show" its territorial claim over the region.

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James Hobson's curator insight, November 21, 2014 7:12 PM

(East Asia topic 2)

The aggressive stance which China is seen as taking towards its oceanic claims can be tied closely with its lack of a mainland frontier. Having no where else to go westward, the only other option is apparently to go very-outward into the south and east. The fact that there is virtually no land in this region is a mute point due to the huge resources which lie under the ocean's surface.

   This action taken by China seems to eerily represent actions of the United States around 70 years ago; once the western frontier had been settled and firmly claimed, the desire to continue expansion can be seen through the U.S.'s involvement with Hawaii, the Philippines, Guam, Midway Island, and the like. Though there may have been the use of war as a reason to do this in the case of America, the nationalistic desire for expansion can clearly be seen. European powers, which have especially been short on land frontiers, certainly have exhibited the same traits in history.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 22, 2014 9:46 PM

This new map of China, not surprisingly produced by China, may not look any different than the maps you see now, until you notice the dashed lines in the South China Sea.  These lines are meant to outline the area of Chinese territory.  They have also claimed, which has turned up as false, that they had ancient claim to this area.  This wouldn't be such a big deal except the fact that there are oil reserves in the area in which China has marked its claim.  Not only would this specific area become a new resource for China but also the international waters that they have greatly increased for themselves.  With China's new claim to this area in the South China Sea they have expanded the area that they control as well as gaining a great deal of international water that they would have drilling rights to.  This has neighboring countries up in arms for good reason.  China is trying to take over land that isn't theirs with no validity solely for the oil claims.  Although they are controlling the area in which they have staked a claim on, the courts could soon make sure this isn't happening.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:50 PM

The new map published by the Chinese government is a clear message of what they feel are their territorial boundaries. In areas that are contested between China and other countries, the map makes a bold claim that these areas belong to China. Chinese activities in these disputed areas match up with the attitude conveyed by this map.

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Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World

Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
Investigate for yourself the mechanisms of global trade

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HG Académie de Rennes's curator insight, April 17, 2014 4:00 PM

Ressource numérique interactive mêlant planisphère, routes maritimes, graphiques de l'activité portuaire et vues aériennes des plus grands ports du monde et de leur aménagement notamment pour la conteneurisation du commerce maritime. Une ressource tout à fait exploitable en 4e bien qu'étant en anglais (très peu de texte). On pensera aussi à la classe de terminale et aux DNL anglais.

Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, April 28, 2014 1:57 PM

Un excellent site très utile lorsque l'on traite de la mondialisation


Pour aller plus loin

    - Site de l'Isemar (une mine)

    - Des statistiques très utiles

    - Les grands ports d'Asie orientale (conférence d'Yves Boquet, FIG, 2009) 

    - Conférence de Jacques Charlier : compte-rendu (conférence FIG 2013)

    - Le conteneur, une histoire de la mondialisation


FIG : Festival International de Géographie de Saint-Dié-des-Vosges


Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:05 PM

While this might simply seem like a group of ports the more important message conveyed is that in fact that the majority of them are located in East Asia. Gone are the days of the industrial centers of the earth being located in Europe and the Americas. Paired with cheap labor and ease of global transportation many of these East Asian countries are quickly over coming many of the earths previous economic giants. 

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Disputed Isles

Disputed Isles | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

Competing territorial claims have led to maritime disputes off the coast of Asia. See a map of the islands at issue.

 

This is an nice interactive map that allows the reader to explore current geopolitical conflicts that are about controlling islands.  This is an good source to use when introducing Exclusive Economic Zones, which is often the key strategic importance of small, lightly populated islands.   

 

Tags: EastAsia, SouthEastAsia, political, unit 4 political, territoriality, autonomy, conflict, economic. 


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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 16, 2014 6:20 PM

This interactive map discusses the current disputes between the islands and why the land is being disputed. 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2014 2:40 PM

This interactive page gives relevant information about islands that are disputed over in southeast Asia.  I liked it because you could see the information in context with the map.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:47 PM

This is like a game of Monopoly when people try and get all the houses or businesses. Except this is real life and real isles. Whose is whose? How does Asia decide where and how the EEZ's should be divided.