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The colourful propaganda of Xinjiang

The colourful propaganda of Xinjiang | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"China is in the midst of a crackdown on what it describes as 'terrorism driven by religious extremism'. The campaign is focused on the western province of Xinjiang, home to China's Uighur ethnic minority who are predominantly Muslim."


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Kendra King's curator insight, April 3, 2015 7:37 PM

This art seems like a logical extension of the government’s use of power although I personally don’t agree with their abuse of power. In China the government will uses its authority to monitor the personal activities of its citizens as demonstrated by the pictures dictating what people should and shouldn’t wear. When the citizens don’t follow through with China’s rule, violence typically happens. In fact, a fair deal of the paintings showed violence (i.e. the tank running people over). I actually find those depictions more offensive and disturbing than any of the other pictures because the end result is clearly that of dath rather than disapproval. Now, I understand that some places need to be ruled with an iron fist (i.e. Iraq), however I don’t really see how threatening people with more violence solves the issue of extremism. If anything, doesn’t this just give the extremist more of a reason to dislike the government? As such, is the government just creating more resentment that will lead to demonstrations in the future? I say this because eventually when a local population is subject to such horrible treatment, there isn't much else to lose and very little reason no to fight back. 

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 16, 2015 9:20 PM

This article has great insight on the way government influences popular belief. We have seen these many times in American society also when government was afraid of communism during the cold war for instance. Often we have prejudgements or beliefs and we are not sure where they even stem from. Pushed Propaganda can be very influential over the mass population, in instilling certain beliefs.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:45 PM
The point the Chinese are trying to make is that the Muslim people are bad, they do unacceptable things and it needs to be taken care of. They are making it hard for a couple to get married and if they do it is with special permission. They even banned anyone under the age of 18 to enter a mosque. Praying in Xinjiang is highly regulated and comes with strict rules and consequences. In all their propaganda you can see how they represent getting rid of the muslims because they are wearing black. If you ask me, it seems like the government is doing this because they are afraid of being taken over and losing the area, just like we used to use propaganda in the wars.
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Where China and Kazakhstan Meet

Where China and Kazakhstan Meet | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"While people often say that borders aren’t visible from space, the line between Kazakhstan and China could not be more clear in this satellite image. Acquired by the Landsat 8 satellite on September 9, 2013, the image shows northwestern China around the city of Qoqek and far eastern Kazakhstan near Lake Balqash.

The border between the two countries is defined by land-use policies. In China, land use is intense. Only 11.62 percent of China’s land is arable. Pressed by a need to produce food for 1.3 billion people, China farms just about any land that can be sustained for agriculture. Fields are dark green in contrast to the surrounding arid landscape, a sign that the agriculture is irrigated. As of 2006, about 65 percent of China’s fresh water was used for agriculture, irrigating 629,000 square kilometers (243,000 square miles) of farmland, an area slightly smaller than the state of Texas.

The story is quite different in Kazakhstan. Here, large industrial-sized farms dominate, an artifact of Soviet-era agriculture. While agriculture is an important sector in the Kazakh economy, eastern Kazakhstan is a minor growing area. Only 0.03 percent of Kazakhstan’s land is devoted to permanent agriculture, with 20,660 square kilometers being irrigated. The land along the Chinese border is minimally used, though rectangular shapes show that farming does occur in the region. Much of the agriculture in this region is rain-fed, so the fields are tan much like the surrounding natural landscape."

 

Tags: remote sensing, land use, environment, geospatial, environment modify, food, agriculture, agricultural land change.


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Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, April 15, 2015 10:24 AM

It is amazing what irrigation can produce.  The border between China and Kazakhstan is a perfect picture of land with irrigation and one without supplied water.  Eastern Kasakhstan has farmland but it is only subsidized by natural rainfall whereas on the greener Chinese side of the border it is supplemented with water by the farmers.  Great picture!

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 2015 12:00 PM

Seeing such a striking difference between two countries that are so close together is strange and thought-provoking. Knowing a little bit about the two countries can make a world of difference, though. In this case, we have China and Kazakhstan, two countries located in East/Central Asia. Kazakhstan borders China to the west, along the northern part of its western border. Much of China's inland land use is devoted to agriculture, as the majority of its industry is located near its coast. This is evident by the amount of green space seen in the satellite image above. With well over a billion people to feed, China needs to make use of as much of its arable land as possible. Kazakhstan, on the other hand is a much smaller country with much less land devoted to agriculture. Its farmland is mostly large and industrial, as a result of Soviet-era farming and is rain-fed rather than irrigated, like China's.

 

Knowing the history as well as the economic strengths of a country can therefore be useful in interpreting satellite images such as the one in this article. A lack of knowledge about China and Kazakhstan's economy and history may lead to an assumption that the Chinese are just better farmers than the Kazakhs. This is of course not necessarily true, but what is true is that China has a much larger and more immediate need for agriculture than does Kazakhstan and so devotes more of its land, time, and energy to farming. Likewise, it shouldn't be assumed that Kazakhstan has no need for agriculture at all. Instead, its history has largely influenced its economic strengths and needs, and the result is a country that looks very different from China. 

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 19, 2015 12:41 PM

It's crazy to see how much human influences can reshape the landscape, or how things we tend to think of in more abstract terms- like national boundaries- can be very physical in nature. I liked reading about the differing agricultural approaches the two nations take, and being able to see the physical manifestations of those two different approaches so obviously. It's impressive to think that China is able to support such a massive population- one in every 5 people alive on the planet is Chinese- with so little land, and the consequences are plain to see in the image above. Increased irrigation efforts leads to the unnaturally bright green patches in the middle of a relatively dry area, serving as a symbol of man's attempts to bind mother nature to his will. Although not always successful, such attempts appear to be working well here. In contrast, Kazakhstan's population demands vary wildly from that of China's, and its solution for feeding its people can therefore take a more natural, backroads approach, with food production concentrated in a few areas. I wonder what other international borders can be seen so neatly with the naked eye.

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China's territorial claims

One of the geography videos embedded in this interactive map: http://bit.ly/KDY6C2


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John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:24 PM

China is imposing these territorial claims as it is a benefit for their economy. That being said this can cause geo-political tensions that can have detrimental effects on how one country trades with another. 

WILBERT DE JESUS's curator insight, April 27, 2015 12:09 PM

China is currently creating islands in the south china sea to be able to claim the 200 nautic miles around those islands as their EEZ, a chapter of cheeting in its claims over control of the south china sea.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 6, 2015 3:08 PM

China's rise to prosperity over the last couple of decades is not solely  alarming for far-reaching regions of the world but also its neighbors.  This video highlights that with its coverage of the land-disputes between China and its Eastern and Southeastern Asian neighbors.  It's only common sense to realize that once a nation becomes a world power it will seek to grow even more powerful.  couple that with the fact that a small nation will inevitably feel self-conscious compared to its huge neighbor you get the phenomenon that is covered in this video.

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Military industrial complex: These 15 countries have the largest defense budgets

Military industrial complex: These 15 countries have the largest defense budgets | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
World defense spending is expected to go up for the first time in five years, thanks to China and Russia.

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 18, 2014 1:32 PM

Russia is the third highest goverment military that spends around 143 million people lived in Russia in 2012 and they spent around $475 per person on it's military. Russia compared to China and the US is another story the US is number one in who spent the most on their military forces at $600.4 billion. As far as China is concerened it comes in at number two at spending around  $112.2 billion. These numbers make sense especially for the power house that China is and how their values of militarism affect their spending and their way of society/life.

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, March 7, 2015 10:00 PM

Wow looking at all these defense military budgets show why some economies are not producing well, but at the same time its astonishing how much money is spent protecting homelands. It will grow in the next 5 years, and hopefully i'll be around to see what has changed who has taken the top position because i feel as if their will be a shift in the tides.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 9, 2015 6:10 PM

Not surprised at many names on the list, but am surprised at The US figure, how much it costs per American, and at the gap between The US and China.  Its scary to see some of the names on the list though and wonder if they are using that money for defense, or an offensive attack.

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East Asia's maritime disputes

East Asia's maritime disputes | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
A race for energy resources makes unresolved territorial disputes more dangerous in both North-East and South-East Asia

Tags: borders, political, conflict, water, China, Japan, East Asia.


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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:48 PM

I couldn't view this content. Its "cookies" were unable to read my computer.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 1:04 PM

Oil resources in the South China Sea are fueling territorial disputes over small islands and territorial waters. China, in order to claim these oil plays for itself, is claiming islands all over the sea. Extending its EEZ will ensure these oil plays. Many of these islands are no more than coral atolls, but China is arguing that they belong to it because of its measures to develop some of these islands. One resort islands and weather stations are being constructed in order to provide some sort of legitimate claim to these places. Also, by claiming these islands and expanding the EEZ, China is trying to claim other countries' EEZs as its own. While China is the powerhouse of the region, many fear that land grabs may turn into military action. 

 

As long as the world is reliant on fossil fuels, territorial disputes will continue and possibly grow in number. Dependency on a non-renewable resource will eventually lead to more regional and global arguments. 

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, April 12, 2015 3:26 PM

The dispute between The north and South of asia are evident. in a global perspective this territorial battle in somewhat may affect global development as far as trading with the United states. It will affect global interests, and this is why the senator kerry as i recall has made countless trips to help resolve the issues between the two North east and the South to come into an agreement to help because they dont want to loose energy resources and disturb the security that has been provided its a very tough situation.

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Complex International Borders

More complex international borders in this follow up to part 1. 
In this video I look at even more enclaves and exclaves."


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Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 23, 2015 11:40 PM

After viewing this video, I found one common characteristic that ties together the countries involved in all of these border disputes: hunger for power. Although culture and sacred lands do cause border disputes, I believe the underlying purpose of claiming land for cultural reasons is to demonstrate power. Claiming lands for cultural purposes demonstrates that one's culture is superior to the other's culture, so naturally the more powerful culture gets to claim territory. On another note, I think it's interesting to see just how many enclaves and exclaves exist in the world. I did not know how many existed until I saw the video. I think this shows how insignificant these border anomalies are because these exclaves are usually just governed by the other country by which they are surrounded. 

Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 7, 2015 9:13 PM

Borders seem to be a problem whether you live in one continent or another, everyone wants power and control but not everyone can gain it. This video focuses and goes into depth about enclave and exclave borders, showing the irregularity of the borders in different areas that causes conflicts and problems. An example of a problem that the citizens have to deal with is that some villages can not leave due to the road blocks due to the borders. I can not imagine not being able to leave a certain area for all that time, I would go insane and I imagine those people are as well. International borders power has to be split somehow and not everyone can always come to an easy decision because parts of the land are claimed but the people do not have any control of it. Irregular borders cause more trouble than they are worth in my opinion. The final interesting fact about this video was that you learn that Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan are the two locations that have the most irregular border, these places must have the most conflict and problems. These borders are in places such as Germany, South Asia, China, Belgian, Sweden and Central Asia.

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 17, 2015 5:17 PM

A fascinating look into the complexity of borders. It is always important to keep in mind when looking at maps that the borders are neither permanent or defined as it exists in reality. Borders on world maps are rough estimations of what the borders actually are for they can't depict precise details on such a large scale. Furthermore regional/local maps sometimes do not whether as to conform to the border misconception unfortunately. In Central Asia as defined int he video the border were primarily a result of the Soviet Unions attempts to divided ethnic minorities reducing their power (primarily Stalin). As a result the countries after the collapse proceeded to claim the ethnic groups which created enclaves within each-other. As long as these groups are on peaceful terms this kind of thing isn't an issue. Unfortunately it does make the peoples lives in the enclaves slightly more difficult due to having to cross the border twice to see the rest of your country. This kind of thing was even done to the Jews in the first century AD who like the Russians wanted to eliminate or at least reduce attempts at revolution by the local populace. Hopefully Central Asia has or will make the lives of these enclaves easier.

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China publishes new map

China publishes new map | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
China has published a new map of the entire country including the islands in the South China Sea (West Philippine Sea) in order to "better show" its territorial claim over the region.

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David Lizotte's curator insight, April 23, 2015 1:09 PM

This map exemplifies how different countries have differing impressions of land/territory that they own. China views itself as this image depicted above. They honestly believe it. As ridiculous as it sounds I do understand why. China owns this region of the world and will continue to do so. They are claiming land and even forming new land throughout the South China Sea. What is important about the creating of land mass is that China then controls 200 nautical miles around whatever they construct. There is nothing the neighboring countries in the region can do about it. China knows it is a dominant military power and intimidates other countries.

For example, the island of Taiwan is claimed by China as a province. China does not recognize the "Republic of China" (ROC) which governs Taiwan and used to govern mainland China prior to the Chinese Civil War. China has even threatened the island with military use if the people openly declare a massive independent movement. There is a lot more to this history, more than a scoop can provide for, however in a nutshell, Taiwan is China's and will continue to be so. 

In another region of China bordering India and Pakistan, which conveys the expansive territory China covers as a country and its various neighboring countries, China is yet claiming another piece of land. As if the dispute between India and Pakistan was not great enough the two countries also differ over territory just north of the Kashmir border region. China also believes this territory is theirs, now making the land up for grabs between the three nations. China may or may not have historical ties that link it to this piece of land. But in either case it certainly views this territory as an area of land that is open for taking, in that it could eventually claim the territory as a whole. What would Pakistan and India do? These two countries have enough going on. 

Anneliese Sjogren's curator insight, December 10, 2015 11:06 PM

It's strange to see that the map includes these islands, when they aren't often seen as being Chinese territory. It appears like the country is shown as being bigger than it actually is.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:55 AM

At first when looking at this map, it seems just about right knowing that China is a huge territorial country, but we also see that this map, when compared to an older map, is different. In this map, we can see that the islands on the West, China has claimer part of there territory. This is simply an analysis of how China seeks geopolitical power over these islands. The map shows China’s claim over the South China Sea by marking ten dash lines around the region just off the coasts of Vietnam, Malaysia, Brunei, and the Philippines’ islands of Palawan and Luzon. These are all individual countries, that have there own culture, language, separate of that of China. The difference between this issue and perhaps that of Catalonia seeking independence over Spain, is that these countries like Malaysia and Brunei are already territorial countries. China is simply showing that they have the power to declare this map, even if its not true. 




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These 23 Far Away Perspectives Of Famous Places Will Change The Way You See Them Forever

These 23 Far Away Perspectives Of Famous Places Will Change The Way You See Them Forever | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
Time to start packing my bags - it's time to travel again!

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Todd Parsons's curator insight, March 29, 2014 3:38 PM

Incredible zoom out on many of the most famous locations in the world. Absolutely love this.

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Missing Girls...

"In India, China and many other parts of the world today, girls are killed, aborted and abandoned simply because they are girls. The United Nations estimates as many as 200 million girls are missing in the world today because of this so-called 'gendercide' or femicide."


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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:10 PM

Females might be the underdogs of men forever. Hopefully this is not the case but it just seems like it will be sometimes, doesn't it? Women have had issues with rights and equality from the beginning of time. Things need to change on a global scale for horrible situations like this to stop occurring so frequently.

Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, December 2, 2014 9:52 PM

Unit 3 Cultural Processes and Patterns

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, December 15, 2014 3:45 PM

This femicide is extremely disappointing.  Genocide is expected in third world, war torn countries.  The fact that it's 2014 and female babies are murdered for being girls, and parents are scared for their  children's lives, show how much power the government has over the people's lives. It is sad to think the government has the power to dictate how many children families can have and what gender.  On the flip side, these are countries that are extremely overpopulated.  The one child policy in China is what China is currently using (along with this femicide) as population control.  This is an important issue because there needs to be some sort of population control, but to what extent? This is taking away someone's basic human right - to procreate. Parents do not have control over what gender they produce and if they produce a female, their child may be taken and murdered from them. The state takes away what you created, your offspring and there is nothing they can do about it. 

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Shanghai: 1990 vs. 2010

Shanghai: 1990 vs. 2010 | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

Globalization has hit...hard and fast. 


Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO, Jose Soto, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 4:19 PM

Shanghai China, a global transportatio hub has grown tremendously into a megaity within 20 years. This is due to the high imports and the location on the river. This created a high import rate and a low wage rate. Because of this they were able to build this city into a megacity.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:22 PM
Wow! All I can say is Wow! Shanghai overall in every way is highly indistinguishable from what it was in 1990. On the far side it is minimally developed and on the close side it has what looks to be a fairly modern city for the 90s. Take a jump twenty years and it is as if it was built the way it looks currently Even the side closest that was developed in the 90s, looks like it was scrapped and rebuilt to be even more modern, a mega city. Because of its strategic location and has a river for transportation, it is a transportation hub, which is why it has the money to do what it does.
Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:46 AM

These two images are perhaps a goo example of how globalization has developed over Shanghai in just 20 years. The images show how once greener and more spacious the region looked before in 1990, and the other image shows how technology has developed and become an important priority to the people. There are huge tall buildings located in the area and the other natural source seen is the body of water surrounding some of the tallest buildings in the area. There is no longer any trees which is also a sign of how un-important or how simple to was for the Shanghai to knock them down to simply make more buildings. The concept shows how business has developed in the region but also shows the potentially jobs located here as well. Overall, this part of Shanghai is very economically stable but it is also important to see outside of the heart of the buildings.