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Quebec Voters Say 'Non' to Separatists

Quebec Voters Say 'Non' to Separatists | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

"Quebec voters gave a resounding no to the prospects of holding a third referendum on independence from Canada, handing the main separatist party in the French-speaking province one of its worst electoral defeats ever."  

 

Quebec, which is 80 percent French-speaking, has plenty of autonomy already. The province of 8.1 million sets its own income tax, has its own immigration policy favoring French speakers, and has legislation prioritizing French over English.  But many Quebecois have long dreamed of an independent Quebec, as they at times haven't felt respected and have worried about the survival of their language in English-speaking North America.

 

Tags: Canada, political, devolution.


Via Seth Dixon
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Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 2:14 PM

Quebecois have voted against seperating from Canada and becoming a sovereign French Speaking state. Even though the Quebecois was to keep their French language and their own culture, they still voted against become a sovereign independent state but keep their strict French laws. Quebec is an interesting example of how movement affects place by how their immigrants have changed their French landscape forcing them to enact laws.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, September 23, 2014 11:14 AM

What started as an election focused on the Parti Quebecois "values", containing a questionable effort to outlaw Muslim head wear and other religious symbols, ended up turning to a matter of independence for province. Possibly riding on the coattails of the recent Scottish vote, the PQ ended up losing the election and their hold on the position of Premier. Quebec already enjoys a good amount of independence, and the election seems to show that for now its good enough for the people of Quebec. 

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:32 PM

The politics of Quebec are interesting to say the least. Originally founded by the French in the 17th century and then later conquered by the English in the late 18th century Canada is a nation with a mix if influences. While much of Canada today is something of a standard English colony Quebec has desperately hung on to it's French roots. In Quebec City their are laws ensuring that all store signs are in French, even making sure the font is large enough. In spite of their dogged interest in preserving their culture they've voted against spiting from the body of Canada repeatedly. This is largely because even the more die hard French Canadians know their small territory is unable to economically survive on its own.

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
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Bizarre Borders


Via Seth Dixon
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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 1, 2014 7:28 PM

The video highlights a bunch irregularities along the US/Canadian border. Among them, the zigzag 49th not-so-parallel, a small island which is actually a disputed territory, and another US island which is far closer to Canada than it is Washington state causing high school students to have to cross international borders four times to attend school.



This is an interesting video in that it shows how even in the recent past how difficult it was to clearly and conclusively delineate the border between the US and Canada. The fact that there is still a disputed island between two very friendly nations. This only makes it more clear why much older, less friendly nations would have heated disputes over territory.

 

Mrs. B's curator insight, February 15, 2014 9:46 AM

Did you know the geometric boundary between US and Canada (the longest border in the world) is also a physical border? Check it out.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 5, 2014 8:45 PM

This video shows how political geography does not always match up perfectly with physical geography, showing how the "no-touching zone" between the US and Canada has led to several border irregularities. It's very interesting to see how a seemingly straight border on a map is actually an odd and irregular jagged line that defines the political boundary. 

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How the Canadian Provinces and Territories Got Their Names

How the Canadian Provinces and Territories Got Their Names | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
Here's a little more Canadian history on this Canada Day.    

Via AP US History, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks, Seth Dixon
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Kaylin Burleson's curator insight, July 3, 2013 11:42 AM

Like Seth said - a little late for Canada Day, but we can certainly use in our World Geography  unit on North America.   

 

Sara Kanewske's curator insight, July 12, 2013 10:07 PM

Toponyms

English Gallery's curator insight, July 17, 2013 9:04 AM

Great for a little extra look at toponyms