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World Population Prospects

World Population Prospects | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it

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LeeBurns's curator insight, February 11, 2014 5:20 AM

#unit4 #population

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 2014 1:27 PM

This graph depicts the estimated population growth throughtout the years of 1950-2100. Age has a lot to do with the increasing rate by millions. The people that are 65+ represented in the green are "peaking old" at 2080. As for the 15-64 age braket they are represented in the red and are reaching the "Adult peak" at the year 2030. And lastly, the "Peak Child" is represented in the blue achieves that in 1990. All of these statistics stem from the Brazilian records and are relative to the daily life and climate of the specific group or individual.

Albert Jordan's curator insight, February 12, 2014 5:56 PM

Looking at the statistics for South America’s growth rate since 1950, it has grown rapidly. This rapid growth can easily be attributed to modernization, increased stability within the governments(even if corruption is still rampant in some places and the U.S. isn’t fiddling its fingers in politics or funding government overthrows), and increased outside development thanks to increased global globalization. While total population of the region is expected to rise until it peaks in 2050, so is population density and age. This will create sanitation, infrastructure, and healthcare issues that many parts of the continent may not be ready to address or able to. Even though economic strength is typically on the rise, these are still poorer developing nations. The birthrate is already beginning to peak and taper off even if deaths continue to rise. However, there is still predicted to be more births than death. Improved healthcare globally since 1950 has found its way into South America and so has economic output, bringing with it – immigration. Numbers such as South America’s can be used to create a visual representation by using a population pyramid to figure out which phase of the demographic transition model the region, or with more specific numbers, a country was in, is going into, and will predicable be in.

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Favela Images

Favela Images | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
I love these favela images by Fernando Alan.
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James Hobson's curator insight, September 30, 2014 8:57 AM

(South America topic 6)

These images seem almost unreal in the sense that these favelas appear to be like trees growing out of the hillside. I noticed that the homes towards the bottom of the hill appear much smaller than those at the top. If all were the same size the ones on the top would appear to be smallest from this angle. Even though this is considered a favela, it must be that some are willing to sacrifice space for convenience of location. Lastly, I would imagine that it must be easy to get lost on the way to one's home... the twisting paths and lack of any 'official' streets would be a maze to an outside visitor. I wonder if anybody has had the idea to start making a so-called road map of the paths through these favelas? That would be very interesting to see.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 24, 2014 9:29 PM

These images of the Favelas in Brazil are absolutely amazing. Not only does it show the poor urban parts of the city are, but just how hard it is to live in these areas, as well as, the clustered so many houses are. The largest picture shown seems like a painting and not a picture, which makes the pictures more fascinating to look at.

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, February 14, 7:53 PM

Favelas are very important part of Brazil because it shows what culture Brazil identify. Ideologically Brazil is known as a beautiful place with beautiful beaches and beautiful people and world wide known soccer location. Favelas are having trouble with urban planners, and mudslides so its very difficult to live up on a mountain for free without consequences but that's whom Brazilians are as they show that without the government not helping them out they will strive to do whats best for not only themselves but their families.

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Walled World

Walled World | Human Geography Too | Scoop.it
We chart the routes of, and reasons for, the barriers which are once again dividing populations

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 14, 2014 9:48 PM

It appears India is constructing a 2,500-mile long fence around its neighboring country Bangladesh. The barbed wire fence may have been built due to that fact India has one of the largest populations in the world and they do not want the struggling people of Bangladesh to enter their country. Also, areas around the fence are becoming dangerous, with more than 1,000 people killed by border patrol and criminals. There are not many jobs in Bangladesh and the people are having trouble finding clean drinkable water. Lastly, the people may be fleeing into India hoping to find work and an improved lifestyle.  

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 2014 6:51 PM

Walls are a symbol of political boundaries and motives, usually intended to keep certain people in or out. This website in particular clearly highlights this idea in human geography as it explores the various walls that mark our landscape and thus contribute to changing policies and borders. Walls can also affect the landscape, not just mark it, as an effect of asserting either political dominance or border policies, as best seen by the resulting environmental results that come from it and the displacement of people (as seen on Palestinian-Israeli border). 

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 2014 1:06 AM

We looked at this map in class its really interesting nd weird to see all the dividing walls in the world and to discover ones youve never seen before.