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How the Potato Changed the World

How the Potato Changed the World | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Brought to Europe from the New World by Spanish explorers, the lowly potato gave rise to modern industrial agriculture

Via Seth Dixon
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Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 10:38 AM

Potatoes were very important in the Colombian Exchange, which was the exchange of plants and animals to and from different lands where they are not native to.  Today, the potato is the fifth most important crop in the world.  Food is deeply routed in culture and this massive exchange changed societies.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 8:41 PM

Potatoes were brought to the New World through the Columbian Exchange. It does have a negative connotation but the trade route was used to diffuse cultures by trading food. 

Gina Panighetti's curator insight, August 4, 2:35 PM

Columbian Exchange Unit

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Mapping Europe's war on immigration

Mapping Europe's war on immigration | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Europe has built a fortress around itself to protect itself from ‘illegal' immigration from the South, from peoples fleeing civil war, conflict and devastating poverty. The story is best understood through maps.
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Marist Geography's curator insight, October 17, 2013 5:05 AM

This shows how Europe controlles entry into its borders. With MEDC's being favoured over LEDC's

François Arnal's comment, October 21, 2013 8:32 AM
https://www.facebook.com/events/462634527184992/
François Arnal's comment, October 21, 2013 8:33 AM
A "Café géographique" with Philippe Rekacewicz" in ST Dié des Vosges for the International Festival of Geography. https://www.facebook.com/events/462634527184992/
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Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century

Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
New nations seem to pop up with alarming regularity. At the start of the 20th century, there were only a few dozen independent sovereign states on the planet; today, there are nearly 200!

Via Seth Dixon
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Kevin Cournoyer's comment, April 30, 2013 9:54 PM
I found this article really interesting for a few different reasons. As a history major, the article provided a lot of information that I thought was interesting and of which I was unaware. It’s important to understand the reasons for the breakup and/or formation of countries when studying history. Part of understanding that is recognizing and analyzing the geographic implications of these changes.
Perhaps most importantly, the disappearance of countries would certainly have severe economic repercussions. The complete absence of an economy that had been around for decades, or the emergence of several new economies all at once would have serious effects on the interaction between neighboring countries and the global economy. Cultural unity and tension also plays a large role in the disappearance of countries. Examining patterns of cultural dissimilarity and hostility explains the breakup of these countries and makes for nations that possess a great deal of cultural homogeneity and a palette of cultural diversity in a small geographic area.
Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 2, 2013 8:38 AM

Amazing to see many of the countries and empires that are no longer around.  Also with the dissoution of many of the empires it lead's to many of the issues that were are dealiing with today.  Splitting the Austro-Hugaraian Empire after WWI along ethnic lines didn't really work and helped to lead to WWII.  The Germans in the Sudetenland in Czechoslovakia fro example.  See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sudetendeutsche_gebiete.svg

 for the area of German population.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 2:01 PM

10 countries that have become nonexistent in the 20th century include Tibet, East Germany and Yugoslavia. These countries have died off because of ethic, religious and cultural falls that were quickly taken over by bigger and more powerful countries.

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Culture Ministry Affirms 'Russia is not Europe'

Culture Ministry Affirms 'Russia is not Europe' | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

"A state commission working on a much-discussed report titled 'Foundations of State Cultural Politics' will release their findings in two weeks, presidential advisor Vladimir Tolstoi announced last week, adding that the basic formula of the report could be summarized as 'Russia is not Europe.'"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 8, 7:17 PM

At times Russia has sought to be perceived as a part of Europe only to be excluded in the minds (and institutions) of Western Europe.  Now, in a discursive way to protect itself, it is reaffirming and building a cultural buffer zone between Europe and Russia.  What are the borders of Europe as you think of it?  Can world regions change over time?  Any examples of regions having their borders redrawn?  


Tags: RussiaEurope, regions.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 9:46 PM

Russia is usually associated with Europe but not Western Europe but there is a push to separate Russia from Europe.

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Time to scrap “Eastern Europe”

Time to scrap “Eastern Europe” | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Europe’s divisions are indeed grave. But counting the ex-communist countries as a single category is outdated and damaging 

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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:23 PM

This video was insightful because it can be really challenging to classify a region in certain parts of the world. Having a simple eastern and western Europe made a tiny amount of sense at the time of WWII but it hasn't made any sense since then.  The boundaries in the southeastern part of Europe have changed on more than one occasion over the past 70 years and there are still border disputes between religious and ethnic groups that could result in new countries any day.  I found the narrator's ideas funny but still better than the traditional region that already exist.  

I personally group regions by the types of people that live in them and share very similar characteristics. Grouping parts of Europe is very hard because of the major cultural differences all over and because I am not highly educated on all of them.  I find it hard to consider Greece a part of Europe at times but it is also hard to consider it a part of anywhere else.  The countries that border Russia all seem similar to me because I don't have extensive knowledge of their cultures, although it is unfair that they are assumed to be completely impoverished countries. 

With the constantly shifting boundaries and movement of people, Europe is very hard to group into regions and that is okay because regions do not have huge effects on the way the world is run, they only make it easier to break down into pieces.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 8:46 AM

This video makes a good point about where we arbitrarily draw lines on a map.  He uses different groupings to show how silly this can be.  His point is that Eastern Europe no longer really exists and we should no longer use the term.  He then suggests a few different terms to use to group countries in Europe.  My favorite was the grouping called Scared of Russia.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 4:17 AM

This video shows how difficult it is to categorize and group regions together. We tend categorize Eastern Europe as a group due to former political affiliations with the Soviet Union, but this is unfair as these nations are varied ethnically, economically, and politically. Plus, most, if not all, of these nations resented Soviet rule and grouping them due to it is somewhat insulting. Other groupings are not as neat on a map. For example, grouping Europe economically shows a couple Eastern European countries in the upper half and a number of Western European countries like Italy, Spain, and Greece in the lower half.