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Donald Sterling’s Impolite Racism

Donald Sterling’s Impolite Racism | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
The embattled basketball team owner broke the rules of how one should go about being racist in America.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 28, 2014 7:06 PM

The Donald Sterling fiasco has the country talking about race and the how racism plays a role in society and its institutions.  This article has some great fodder for discussion on the topic.  Most especially though, the second half of the linked video, where this question is posed, “Why do racist words bring more accountability than racist practices?”  Given the Cliven Bundy and Donald Sterling stories, it's fair to say that Americans are no longer willing to put up with their racist friends.  

Renata Hill's comment, April 29, 2014 4:22 PM
I so disagree with the delicate use of "impolite" in this head and the way that so many people are tiptoeing around the issue! Sterling's (and Bundy's) type of generational-based racism is so repugnant, so virulent and awful that the only way non-white people (and, frankly, the rest of the US) will be able to live in a decent, compassionate society is for such old, white men to die off. The mainlining of such powerfully prejudiced ancestoral "juice," needs to be cut off, like a gangrenous limb.
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Are You Worldly Enough To Ace This Geography Quiz? - Huffington Post

Are You Worldly Enough To Ace This Geography Quiz? - Huffington Post | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Are You Worldly Enough To Ace This Geography Quiz?
Huffington Post
Sure, you can point your own country and a few others out on a map, but just how far can you go? How well do you actually know the world you live in?
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How to Green Screen on the iPad - YouTube

A quick tutorial of how to do green screen or chroma key work on the iPad using the Green Screen app by DoInk.

Via Timo Ilomäki
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Bye-Bye, Baby

Bye-Bye, Baby | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Birthrates are falling around the world. And that’s O.K.

Via Nancy Watson
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, April 5, 2014 11:23 PM

Baby boom,  baby bust. What the future holds. 

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▶ Countries inside Countries: Bizarre Borders


Via Seth Dixon, Nancy Watson, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, May 18, 2014 2:52 PM

Talk about landlocked!  How would you form policy for a country that is completely surrounded by another country?

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 8:02 PM

APHG-U4

Tori Denney's curator insight, May 27, 5:30 PM

nature, meaning, and function of boundaries - The most common boundaries are nation's borders. This video shows many landlocked or mostly surrounded states, that don't decisive as much freedom as states with many neighbors or open borders. These surrounded states value their borders and boundaries, because even if they are smaller or do not have as much freedom, they have their own state that they rule that is all theirs. The function of these borders as boundaries are to mark the edges of their state and to keep other states out.

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Would You Shock Somebody to Death? | RCScience

Would You Shock Somebody to Death? | RCScience | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

Milgram’s headline-grabbing conclusion that 62.5% of people obeyed instructions appeared to show most of us can be led to kill at an authority’s bidding. But this statistic came from his second, and most widely reported experiment, which involved just 40 people.

 

In fact, Milgram conducted 23 different kinds of experiments, each with a different scenario, script and actors. This patchwork of experimental conditions, each conducted with a sample of only 20 or 40 participants, yielded rates of obedience that varied from 0% to 92.5%, with an average of 43%. Contrary to received opinion, a majority of Milgram’s participants disobeyed.


Via Thomas Schmeling, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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An Atlas of Poverty

An Atlas of Poverty | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
We think we know what poverty looks like. But how do we accurately account for it? How do we know where to look?
Poverty maps are one place to begin. Technological advances of the past decade—the increased capability to both collect and process improved data—make it possible to reveal the face of the poor in finer detail than ever before. By translating data into the visual accessibility of a map, we can locate poverty more precisely, understand its sources more comprehensively—and attack it more effectively. Such maps can even be used to monitor the results of anti-poverty efforts. Poverty maps can be part of a strong, new foundation for building and tailoring policies and programs, to reach those people that will benefit the most.
Via Seth Dixon
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 9, 2014 8:27 PM

This is very revealing

Sieg Holle's curator insight, March 10, 2014 9:10 PM

solutions anyone......

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Demographic Atlas

Demographic Atlas | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
This atlas shows how the population is changing - growing in some parts of the country, while shrinking in others. The maps show the entire United States by county, using data from the U.S. Census Bureau's 2010 Census and Esri. How do things look in your neighborhood?

Via Seth Dixon
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World’s Muslim population more widespread than you might think

World’s Muslim population more widespread than you might think | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
There are about 1.6 billion Muslims, or 23% of the world's population, making Islam the second-largest religion.

Via Seth Dixon
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Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 3:55 PM

Showing the distribution of Islam around the world. Outside of the middle east, Indonesia has the most Muslims. This religion is one of the fastest growing in the world. 

Lena Minassian's curator insight, March 22, 4:46 PM

This article was good to look at because the majority of people assume Muslims are only in the Middle East. There are 1.6 billion Muslims around the world. Two-thirds of the Muslim population live in the Asia-Pacific region than in the middle east. More Muslims actually live in India and Pakistan. Muslims make up the majority of the population in 49 countries around the world. Islam has become the world's second largest religious tradition after Christianity. I would love to know some reasons behind why certain Muslims live in other areas. 

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 4:33 PM

This interesting map/infographic shows where Muslims are concentrated around the world. What I found most interesting and a little bit counterintuitive was that the highest number of Muslims is found in the Asia- Pacific region rather than in Northern Africa or the Middle East. When you consider how large Indonesia's population is, however, and the fact that more than three-quarters of it identify as Muslim, it makes a bit more sense. What is really staggering is the fact that there are an estimated 1.6 billion Muslims around the world, making nearly a quarter of the global population Muslim. 

 

What this map shows is the ability of religion to transcend political, economic, and cultural borders. Though Islam is a religion with its origins in the Middle East, it has grown and spread across the world to now have adherents on every continent. Of course, Islam is not the only major religion to have accomplished this feat, but it is particularly important to keep in mind considering the fear and criticism with which Islam has been met in recent years. People tend to think of Muslims as uniformly extremist advocates of violence who wage holy wars no matter the cost. This is, of course, untrue and characterizes the kind of dangerous stereotyping that occurs in regards to many different religions. While this map seeks to show numbers and percentages, it also shows that there are many, many more Muslims in the world than the extremists highlighted in the news and that Islam is not defined by these radicals. 

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Why Sochi?

Why Sochi? | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Why would Vladimir Putin want to host the Olympics in an underdeveloped place where terrorists lurk nearby? The answer is not as complicated as it may seem.

Via Seth Dixon
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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 18, 2014 1:46 PM

It comes at not shock that Russia has had it's share of bad rulers that exzibit totalitarianistic views. Russia has always been in a state of massacre or some time of bad war torn conflict happeening. Russia is also the type of place where you can drive in each way 45 minutes and be able to either swim in the black sea or ski on the snowy trails. I think this is one of the reasons why the winter olympics are hosted here.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 18, 2014 2:52 PM

There are many reasons as to why the Olympics this year are held in Sochi, Russia i. Although it is an underdeveloped, terrorist driven area, it holds much potential and Vladimir Putin has reasons to why it is the perfect place.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 1, 2014 12:59 AM

This article explains why Putin wanted the Winter Olympic games to be in Sochi. The Olympics have historically been used as a way for a nation to showcase progress or power, and the case is no different here. By hosting the games in Sochi, Putin was drawing attention to his successful crushing of the Chechen rebels and Russia's reinvestment into the area. Through the games, Putin is trying to make an international statement about the security and progress in this war-torn area. Still, there are a number of Chechen rebel cells and Circassian protesters in the area with a grudge against Russia.

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Outdated Sports Mascots

Watch the #BigGame commercial the NFL would never air. Get involved by contacting the Washington Professional Football Team, the NFL and the Washington Post:...

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 2, 2014 8:36 PM

The National Congress of American Indians did not have the funds to run this ad during the Super Bowl to promote their campaign to get the Washington Redskins to change their mascot.  Some argue that it is not offensive but this simple video powerful shows how many Native Americans feel insulted by this anachronistic moniker.  

Paige Therien's curator insight, February 3, 2014 10:52 AM

The superbowl game as well as the commercials that air during it is very telling about the United State's culture.  So much so, that someone who is totally unfamiliar with the culture could learn a whole lot about how our country spend its time, what we eat, what we value, our politics, and how people from other areas interact with eachother.  This is very important when thinking about what we do not see during these games, like this commercial which did not have the funding to air.  Has the idea of race become so much of our cultural mindset that people turn a blind eye to a NFL team called the "redskins" and deem it unoffensive?  This video is powerful because it shows that a diverse, expansive group of people could not possibly be given an umbrella term.

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"Upside down" map of the world, by Hema Maps Get... - Maps on the Web

"Upside down" map of the world, by Hema Maps Get... - Maps on the Web | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
'Upside down' map of the world, by Hema Maps
Get a puzzle with this map (affiliate) ('Upside down' map of the world, by Hema Maps Get a puzzle with...

Via Mr. David Burton
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Create Your Own Map

Create Your Own Map | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

"Create a color-coded Visited States Map, showing off your road travel in the United States and Canada."


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Charles Adami's curator insight, November 18, 2013 9:52 PM

Students color code states involved in expedition. Louisiana Purchase , and US circa 1803.

Cam E's curator insight, January 28, 2014 12:40 PM

I took the liberty of using this site which was linked on my Professor's page to create my own map of travels within the United States! Green represents states which I've spent many nights, amber for states which I briefly passed through, and red for states I've never been to at all. I didn't include the map for Canada as well, but I've been to Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Ontario primarily. I'm very into the idea of travel and intend to visit as many places as I can in my lifetime, but I have focused much of my journeys for the future into foreign countries. This map gave me the hint that I might want to focus homeward a bit more.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 12, 2014 8:40 PM

http://vsm.defocus.net/img/vsm-28fc2e56c17b6506f2405817cce289c4.png This link is a picture of my map. It was divided by different colors. Red was for places you have not seen. Amber was for places you have seen some and maybe slept there a couple times. Blue meant that you have been there a fair amount of times and green meant that you spent the most time their and slept there on multiple occasions. Unfortunately, almost my whole map was the color red. I haven't been many places. The only places that I have consistently been to are Florida, New York, and Massachusetts. Connecticut on rare occasions and of course Rhode Island was the number one place on my map. I hope to one day turn all those red states into green states.

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10 inventions that owe their success to World War One

10 inventions that owe their success to World War One | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 24, 2014 12:34 AM

War can disrupt supply chains and also create new modes of production, promote emerging fashions and spur new innovations.  World War I was no blessing, but these inventions are the silver lining. 

Matt Richardson's curator insight, May 2, 2014 7:12 AM

This is an interesting article. (Scooped from Dr. Dixon's page.)

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China on course to become 'world's most Christian nation' within 15 years

China on course to become 'world's most Christian nation' within 15 years | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
The number of Christians in Communist China is growing so steadily that it by 2030 it could have more churchgoers than America

Via Seth Dixon
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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, April 28, 2014 3:48 PM

Religion...

Albert Jordan's curator insight, April 29, 2014 2:27 PM

Another example of how one thing can begin in one region, go to another, then another, and then find a new identity as its previous one fades away. As part of what can be said to be a "devlopment" cycle, as a nation goes past manufacturing and into the services sector as well as its populace becoming more secular, the leaders of the church still need to bring in wealth for their coffers. What the missionarys started under colonialism is perhaps starting to pay off. Culture travels just as traded commodities does, by having peoples from different places inter-mingle and the largest motivator of that is global trade bringing people that ordinarily would not have met, together. Or in some cases, bible toting missionaries attempting to "civilize" a "primitive" people. If Jesus doesnt work, there is always opium.. again.

Linda Rutledge Hudson's curator insight, May 13, 2014 4:07 PM

It's interesting to think there are those who believe crime will diminish because there are more Christians.  I guess that's an infusion of Confucian morality and hope into their Christian ideals.  I hope that this will pave a way for the growth of human rights and more political freedom for China.

 

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Feeding 9 Billion - National Geographic

Feeding 9 Billion - National Geographic | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
When we think about threats to the environment, we tend to picture cars and smokestacks, not dinner. But the truth is, our need for food poses one of the biggest dangers to the planet.

Via Allison Anthony
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Culture Ministry Affirms 'Russia is not Europe'

Culture Ministry Affirms 'Russia is not Europe' | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

"A state commission working on a much-discussed report titled 'Foundations of State Cultural Politics' will release their findings in two weeks, presidential advisor Vladimir Tolstoi announced last week, adding that the basic formula of the report could be summarized as 'Russia is not Europe.'"


Via Seth Dixon
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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 9, 5:57 PM

This makes Russia seem like little whining babies, crying because of what other peoples perceptions may or may not be pertaining to their geography.  Do they really think that if they are looked at as European, than people will think they are the same as French people, or if they are considered an Asian country that they will be confused with China? These people are idiots and should be more concerned with their perception around the world as assholes! 

Jacob Conklin's curator insight, May 6, 3:27 PM

Russia has always been the red headed stepchild of Europe (Get it? Red headed....USSR....Communism? Im so freakin funny); not quite European, not quite Asian. Russia has been caught in the middle, not belonging to anyone. Russia, in its history, has tried to westernize under Catherine the Great and other rulers during the Russian Enlightenment period. Russians abandoned their traditional dress and trademark hats in favor of a more western style of dress. Eventually, with the introduction of Lenin, Stalin, and other radical not-all-there leaders, westernization fell and Russia diverged from Europe. This divergence is still seen today with Putin affirming that Russia is not a part of Europe.  

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, May 7, 3:06 PM

I wasn't even really aware that Russia had ever wanted to seem like part of Europe, or that people saw it as part of Europe.  I've always seen Russia as it's own place, because it is.  It is not in Europe, it just borders Europe.  I understand how there is a misconception because most people don't see it as part of Asia either, because it seems much different than other countries in Asia.  However, it should be recognized as it's own place, and not as part of Europe.

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How to Use Green Screen Effects on iPads

How to Use Green Screen Effects on iPads | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
It is easy to use green screen effects on an iPad to produce professional looking videos. Learn how to do it with the Green Screen app by Do Ink.

Via Timo Ilomäki
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Culture Ministry Affirms 'Russia is not Europe'

Culture Ministry Affirms 'Russia is not Europe' | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

"A state commission working on a much-discussed report titled 'Foundations of State Cultural Politics' will release their findings in two weeks, presidential advisor Vladimir Tolstoi announced last week, adding that the basic formula of the report could be summarized as 'Russia is not Europe.'"


Via Seth Dixon
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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 9, 5:57 PM

This makes Russia seem like little whining babies, crying because of what other peoples perceptions may or may not be pertaining to their geography.  Do they really think that if they are looked at as European, than people will think they are the same as French people, or if they are considered an Asian country that they will be confused with China? These people are idiots and should be more concerned with their perception around the world as assholes! 

Jacob Conklin's curator insight, May 6, 3:27 PM

Russia has always been the red headed stepchild of Europe (Get it? Red headed....USSR....Communism? Im so freakin funny); not quite European, not quite Asian. Russia has been caught in the middle, not belonging to anyone. Russia, in its history, has tried to westernize under Catherine the Great and other rulers during the Russian Enlightenment period. Russians abandoned their traditional dress and trademark hats in favor of a more western style of dress. Eventually, with the introduction of Lenin, Stalin, and other radical not-all-there leaders, westernization fell and Russia diverged from Europe. This divergence is still seen today with Putin affirming that Russia is not a part of Europe.  

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, May 7, 3:06 PM

I wasn't even really aware that Russia had ever wanted to seem like part of Europe, or that people saw it as part of Europe.  I've always seen Russia as it's own place, because it is.  It is not in Europe, it just borders Europe.  I understand how there is a misconception because most people don't see it as part of Asia either, because it seems much different than other countries in Asia.  However, it should be recognized as it's own place, and not as part of Europe.

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The Human Imprint

The Human Imprint | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
A Human Geography Resource; Especially for Teachers

 

The Human Imprint is home to everything Human Geography related for the student, educator, and the every day Joe/Jane. This site includes geographic related stories, lesson plans, and other links that bring us closer to understanding the “why of where.”


Via Seth Dixon
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SFDSLibrary's curator insight, May 13, 2014 7:58 AM

Words leading to new Geography treads.

good for up to date articles.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, August 18, 2014 6:54 PM

Unit 1

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:15 PM

course resource

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Teaching Kids about Global Poverty

Teaching Kids about Global Poverty | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

"Living on One Dollar is a full-length documentary made by four college students who traveled to rural Guatemala to live on just a dollar a day. Upon their return, they created Living On One, a nonprofit to raise awareness and inspire action around global issues like hunger and poverty -- and started by publishing the Change Series of video shorts. I found it so compelling I've dedicated this whole film fest to it. Each episode not only succinctly frames an issue faced by people in the developing world and makes it personal, but also offers resource links to learn more -- and even better -- to do something about it."


Via Seth Dixon
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Character Minutes's curator insight, March 13, 2014 1:24 PM

Several character traits could be empasized using theses videos. The wheels in my mind are turning!

 

Marianne Naughton's curator insight, March 13, 2014 8:14 PM

Fundraiser event taught by kids

lyn chatfield's curator insight, March 17, 2014 11:49 PM

The links

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9 Maps That Should Outrage Southerners

9 Maps That Should Outrage Southerners | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Look, there are lots of things to love about the South. It's clean and quiet. There's delicious food, good people and often amazing weather. But that's exactly why it makes us so sad to think about all the ways in which the region is struggling today...

Via Jane Ellingson
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Jane Ellingson's curator insight, March 11, 2014 7:02 PM

Great Choropleth Maps....:)

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Did You Know 3.0

The New 2012 HD version on the progression of information technology researched by Karl Fisch, and modified by me! Globalization & The Information Age.

Via Seth Dixon
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Mrs. B's curator insight, February 5, 2014 9:19 AM

If you haven't seen this classic, don't wait one more minute! Creates a paradigm shift!

Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 5, 2014 7:55 PM

Did you Know? Shift Happens, and it is happening at an exponential rate. Half of this 2012 version maybe obsolete. Time, and technology, does not stand still.

D Langen's curator insight, August 22, 2014 9:50 AM

It has been interesting to watch the "Did You Know" videos updated over the years. The first was profound for me as a teacher and I continued to use the updated versions for years.

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Map: What Country Does Your State's Life Expectancy Resemble?

Map: What Country Does Your State's Life Expectancy Resemble? | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
How California and Virginia can be as different as Liechtenstein and Brunei 

Via Heather Ramsey
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Typhoon Haiyan Before & After

Typhoon Haiyan Before & After | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
View interactive before and after images showing the devastation Typhoon Haiyan has caused in Tacloban City, Philippines.

Via Seth Dixon
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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 19, 2014 10:50 PM

By viewing the before and after images, one can see how destructive this typhoon was. Almost every building was absolutely destroyed and the damage looks overwhelming. Disaster's such as this can really set a country back, as the damage appears to be costly. Although sad to look at, these images were informational. 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 7:01 PM

A great set of photos to show the great destructive force of a storm on coastlines. The Philippines are a bunch of small islands made up of primarily coastlines so this typhoon destroyed huge amounts of the country.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, December 8, 2014 1:16 PM

We know that natural disasters cause a lot of damage and personal loss but we don't really ever know how much damage is caused until we see it.  Even when we do see it if we don't know what it looked like before it really doesn't mean anything to us.  Using these before and after maps you can really understand how much destruction happened when the typhoon hit the Philippines.  You can see the loss of property, infrastructure and natural resources that were once there.  The loss of not only peoples homes, but entire neighborhoods wiped right off the map.  The remnants of roads can be seen but that is all they are, remnants.  The ability to see the before as well as the after really strikes a toll and makes people realize that this is serious and not just another storm for the people that live here.