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Mapping Europe's war on immigration

Mapping Europe's war on immigration | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Europe has built a fortress around itself to protect itself from ‘illegal' immigration from the South, from peoples fleeing civil war, conflict and devastating poverty. The story is best understood through maps.
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Marist Geography's curator insight, October 17, 2013 8:05 AM

This shows how Europe controlles entry into its borders. With MEDC's being favoured over LEDC's

François Arnal's comment, October 21, 2013 11:32 AM
https://www.facebook.com/events/462634527184992/
François Arnal's comment, October 21, 2013 11:33 AM
A "Café géographique" with Philippe Rekacewicz" in ST Dié des Vosges for the International Festival of Geography. https://www.facebook.com/events/462634527184992/
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The Middle East, explained in one (sort of terrifying) chart

The Middle East, explained in one (sort of terrifying) chart | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
"What could be simpler than the Middle East? A well-known Egyptian blogger who writes under the pseudonym The Big Pharaoh put together this chart laying out the region’s rivalries and alliances. He’s kindly granted me permission to post it, so that Americans might better understand the region. The joke is that it’s not a joke; this is actually pretty accurate."
Via Seth Dixon
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Start-of-the-Year Videos

Start-of-the-Year Videos | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

"This is a compilation of videos that can be used to at the beginning of the school year to show the importance of geography, spatial thinking and geo-literacy."


Via Seth Dixon, Mark Solomon
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Jaiden VerSteeg's comment, August 29, 2013 11:41 PM
I watched video #1 and I thought it was very interesting. It was a great way to show what we are going to be learning about. I am really looking forward to learning about it.
Alexandria Goodyk's comment, August 29, 2013 11:59 PM
I watched video #3 and it's crazy how one video can give us so much information. I am so excited to learn new things this year and get educated with all of this stuff.
Richard Miles's curator insight, September 5, 2013 7:29 PM

Great little starters to get the students engaged with Geography!

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Rap, Drugs, And Hijabs: 13 Things You Should Know About Young Iran

Rap, Drugs, And Hijabs: 13 Things You Should Know About Young Iran | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
The future of Iran will be determined by the first post-Revolution generation. Here's what they're like.

Via Matthew Wahl
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The Rise of EduTech in K-12 Classrooms

The Rise of EduTech in K-12 Classrooms | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

Technology use is ubiquitous in K-12 classrooms across the U.S.  The Pew Research Center (2013) surveyed teachers of Advanced Placement (AP) and National Writing Project (NWP) classes about their use of education technology, or “EduTech”, including cell phones, e-readers, tablets, and smartboards (commonly written as “SMART boards”).  They found that these new media not only influence teachers’ teaching methods, but students’ learning processes as well. Some teachers feel that a digital lifestyle has given today’s students a shorter attention span, and as a result, many educators have striven to make their style of teaching more engaging.

Technology affects  the lesson planning and professional development of teachers. Respondents to the Pew survey were described as tech-savvy overall, but they still had to put in extra work to master technological tools.

Refer to the infographic below to take a tour of the classrooms of Ms. Digital and Mr. Tech, and explore how EduTech is used in education, how successful it is, and how it affects students and educators.


Via Seth Dixon
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Natasha Georgiou's curator insight, June 11, 2013 11:00 PM

Not so focused on IWBs but very interesting so I had to include it.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, July 12, 2013 5:52 PM

This is a must see, must share document.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, July 12, 2013 5:53 PM
Thanks for this focus Seth.
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5 things teachers must do to prepare students for the future


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 10, 2013 1:00 PM

This video is the quick visual summary of the book TEACHING 2030. You can purchase the provocative new book at Teachers College Press, Amazon, or Barnes & Noble.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, July 12, 2013 5:48 PM

Good information.

Mrs. B's curator insight, October 5, 2013 9:33 AM

I am excited about where teaching is going. Are we keeping up?

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What is the Purpose of Using Technology in the Classroom?

What is the Purpose of Using Technology in the Classroom? | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 6, 2013 7:33 PM

Using technology in education is incredibly important today...but we must remember WHY we want our students using these tools and not accidentally make the tool itself the objective. 

Pamela Hall's curator insight, August 22, 2013 10:20 AM

This theme carries over to the business world too. Business owners need to realize that understanding the technology available and how to use it's tools can have a major impact on their businesses. "What do you want your business to do with technology?" 

Linda Denty's curator insight, October 10, 2013 1:50 AM

Absolutely true!

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Schools downplaying geography lessons

Schools downplaying geography lessons | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

The Daily Rundown’s Chuck Todd takes a look at the National Geographic Bee and talks with host of the bee and of Jeopardy, Alex Trebek. Trebeck tells Todd that Americans are woefully ignorant when it comes to geography.


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Magnus Gustafsson's comment, June 12, 2013 3:27 PM
In Sweden we have the same discussion about geography in school. It´s easy to learn fact about countries but not so easy to develop the spatial thinking skills.
Joe Andrade's curator insight, July 2, 2013 8:51 PM

Alex Trebek explains the importnace of geography. Its not all about memorizing where things are, its understanding how and why location has such an impact on history, economy and politics.

jfraley0032's curator insight, July 8, 2013 6:24 PM

This is what ive been saying forever! Schools are leaving Geography out! Lets bring out some fun exciting Geography lessons (e.g. Geocaching, Find the box, geography posters, water testing, daily weather checks, even as simple as what to wear today for K-2nd.) Geography is coming back in Mrs. Jessica's Class ASAP!

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The Conflict Zone

The Conflict Zone | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

"In a new series of four eight-minute videos, National Geographic Emerging Explorer Aziz Abu Sarah is a cultural educator working to build relationships between Israelis and Palestinians in Jerusalem and throughout Israel. In this series of four eight-minute videos, Abu Sarah meets with people from both sides of the conflict in order to better understand and communicate how this international dispute impacts their everyday lives."


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Challenging Stereotypes in 'Peter Pan'

Challenging Stereotypes in 'Peter Pan' | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

"Native Americans are characterized, marginalized, counted in number books (see Ten Little Rabbits by Virginia Grossman), depicted with incorrect images, and otherwise represented in hurtful, derogatory ways. Growing up in America, we are bombarded with images, toys, and stereotypes."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 21, 2013 4:37 PM

This article looks at how a Native American family worked within the system to change the school's performance of Peter Pan to be, well, less racist.  It was a product of it's time, and looking at older Disney movies from a 21st century lens can be quite eye-opening.    

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For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price'

For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price' | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

"China's one-child only policy and historic preference for boys has led to a surplus of marriageable Chinese men. Young women are holding out for better apartments, cars and the like from potential spouses...30 to 48 percent of the real estate appreciation in 35 major Chinese cities is directly linked to a man's need to acquire wealth — in the form of property — to attract a wife."

 

Tags: gender, folk culture, China, podcast, culture, population.


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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 10:54 AM

With the new gender imbalance, it is interesting that Chinese families now see boys as the gender that will cost them more money in the long run, it used to be the girl that was a finical burden.  This is a big change in thinking from just a generation ago, it will be interesting to see how this plays out in china over time.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 11:11 AM

This article shows how the One Child Policy has skewed the gender balance in China. There is a shortage of young women and, in order to attract a wife, young Chinese men feel the need to acquire more wealth to gain a competitive advantage in a China with a surplus of men. This wealth grab is possibly fueling the housing market in China, but Chinese women are not seeing many benefits for themselves. The wealth of their husbands tends to be left in the husband's name, leaving women out of the growing economy of China.

 

There is another potential issue as well. The Chinese men are taking out loans to pay for inflated housing prices. If the housing market crashes, these marriage seeking men are left with significant debt for apartments which were overvalued to begin with.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:34 PM

This article is recent too which is scary. Men should be able to pick their own brides and money shouldn't be involved. Women shouldn't have to marry someone for the sake of her family but if thats what she wants to do then fine. Different countries operate different ways and in China, this is how they work.

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This Is What It's Like to Be a Muslim in Boston Right Now

This Is What It's Like to Be a Muslim in Boston Right Now | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
When Anum Hussain heard about the Boston Marathon bombing, she immediately panicked, worried that the culprits would be like her. The 22-year-old Muslim was in the offices of Hubspot, the Cambridge marketing-software company she works for.

Via Seth Dixon
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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 20, 2013 3:33 PM

Being from around the area and listening and watching the tv during the boston bombings all I really thought about was how the city and families were effected by the tragic event. However I never really thought about how it impacted muslim people in the area. For people to put a blame on all muslim people is not right. We are not all the same, which means not all muslims are the same. Some muslims have lived their whole lives in the US and for people to catogorize them all as terrorists isn't right. All people should be treated them same way. It is sad to read the article and think that some muslims in Boston walk around in fear of being beat up or killed just because of their culture. The bombings effected an entire city and muslim people people should be able to mourn with the rest of the city. They grew up there just like we did. So what makes them so different from me and you? Not all muslims are killers like the two boys from the bombings. It is really sad to me that they have to live their lives in fear everyday in a place that they call home, just because of their culture. No one deserves to live like that. I can't even imagine how difficult it is for muslim people in Boston. 

Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 10:38 AM

Terrorism is a huge problem in our Country today. I'm not trying to racist saying this but I feel like they do it to themselves. Coming into our country and terrorizing our nation thats okay? Yes not every Muslim is a terrorist im not saying that but you never know if they are or not. Since 911 we cant trust anyone, and theres a reason for that. I understand that they should not have to feel any different then the average American but the past is what we all dwell on.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 10:19 AM

Some are saying that racism doesnt exist anymore but it does. Muslims still live in fear that they are being judged everyday because some Americans generalize Muslims with terrorism

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What to Expect When No One's Expecting: America's Coming Demographic Disaster

What to Expect When No One's Expecting: America's Coming Demographic Disaster

~ Jonathan V. Last (author) More about this product
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What to Expect When No One's Expecting: America's Coming Demographic Disaster [Jonathan V. Last] on Amazon.com. *FREE* super saver shipping on qualifying offers. Look around you and think for a minute: Is America too crowded?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 27, 2013 9:36 PM

I have yet to read this book, but the title alone says that it could be an intriguing supplemental text for a unit on population (or an 'opposing viewpoint' to consider).  For those that have read the book, please comment below. 


Tags: USA, declining population, population, demographicsmodels.

Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, April 28, 2013 7:36 PM

I really wasn't sure where to put this scoop. There may be a time when the GMOs affect our fertility as many think GMOs are affecting herds fed GMOs. The physical environment might affect this as well. The social and economic challenges may impact fertility and plain selfishness and putting industrial needs over human needs could affect it as well. It looks like an interesting book so I thought I would make note of it.

Tara Cohen's comment, May 1, 2013 2:58 PM
I ordered this book from Amazon because I thought it would be a great fit for AP Human. I read the first 20 pages last night and was blown away. It totally covers all the information in the Demography Unit and the author has a sense of humor. Only 20 pages in, but I give it two thumbs up!
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Here's Why There Are So Many German-Americans In The US

Here's Why There Are So Many German-Americans In The US | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
The largest ancestry group there is.

Via Nancy Watson
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40 Maps That Show How The World Works

40 Maps That Show How The World Works | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
As we’ve mentioned time and time again, there are a lot of creative ways to share information through mapmaking. Recently, a collection of quirky maps made the rounds online.

Via Mark Solomon
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Spatial Diffusion: how regions interact

Describes major regions geographers divide the world into and how spatial diffusion relates to regions

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Start-of-the-Year Videos

Start-of-the-Year Videos | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

"This is a compilation of videos that can be used to at the beginning of the school year to show the importance of geography, spatial thinking and geo-literacy."


Via Seth Dixon
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Jaiden VerSteeg's comment, August 29, 2013 11:41 PM
I watched video #1 and I thought it was very interesting. It was a great way to show what we are going to be learning about. I am really looking forward to learning about it.
Alexandria Goodyk's comment, August 29, 2013 11:59 PM
I watched video #3 and it's crazy how one video can give us so much information. I am so excited to learn new things this year and get educated with all of this stuff.
Richard Miles's curator insight, September 5, 2013 7:29 PM

Great little starters to get the students engaged with Geography!

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The History Teacher´s Perspective

The History Teacher´s Perspective | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
The History Teacher´s Perspective

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How Teachers Can Stop Being Scared Of Twitter

How Teachers Can Stop Being Scared Of Twitter | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Twitter is more than a simple messaging platform. It's a conversation about your passions and it's easy to get completed addicted. That's a good thing.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 6, 2013 11:01 AM

The last two conferences that I have attended have been greatly enriched by the backchannel (the conversation about the conference being held on Twitter).  The backchannel removes the top-down method of disseminating information and ideas as you tailor for stream to find information that interests you (I have no use for Taylor Swift gossip or oncology research at the moment, but if I did, I could find those conversations on Twitter quite easily).  Not surprisingly, my stream is focused on geography education, educational technologies and geospatial tools.  It isn't "one more thing" to complicate your life--it's a great tool to streamline the conversations that you always wish you could have with the people you might not otherwise be able to access.  And that makes it worth trying.  

Steven Sutantro's curator insight, August 7, 2013 12:11 PM
Time to Use #DigitalMedia @digimedclub
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The Trouble with Testing | DMLcentral

The Trouble with Testing | DMLcentral | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

Learning research consistently shows that an emphasis on test scores does not necessarily lead to gains in academic performance. Perhaps learning, with its long-term gains and diffuse experiences does not lend itself well to an economic model. Instead of focusing on test scores at the elementary and secondary levels, why not take a longer-term view? Why public education? What are our true goals for teaching and learning? When pressed, most politicians will state that the long-term goals of education are to develop a citizenry that maximizes contributions to society and economy; yet, our standard test measures typically seem unrelated to the higher-order qualities that lead to such engaged citizens.


Via Nik Peachey
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Tracy Mehoke (梅恬溪)'s curator insight, July 22, 2013 5:30 AM

This article makes some good and concise points against standardized testing, but it doesn't really say anything we don't think already.  What we really need now are new evaluation and assessment tools based on updated goals for education.

Tracy Mehoke (梅恬溪)'s comment, July 22, 2013 5:56 AM
I appreciated the mention that despite ranking in the middle on PISA tests, the USA continues to rank highly in global innovation. What exactly are we trying to measure again ;P ?
Tracy Mehoke (梅恬溪)'s comment, July 22, 2013 5:57 AM
see also: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-m-eger/art-education-and-the-inn_b_825486.html
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Top Ideas for Geography Teachers

Top Ideas for Geography Teachers | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
The GA supports primary and secondary geography teachers through teaching resources, geography journals, CPD events, Barnaby Bear, Worldwise and more.

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Catherine Smyth's comment, May 29, 2013 2:37 AM
A well-resourced professional association for geography based in the UK. The section for primary teachers offers practical and innovative ideas for developing geographical understanding in the primary classroom.
Kelsey Haddrill's curator insight, May 29, 2013 8:21 AM

Would be particularly helpful in creating activities for year 7 geography classes

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Hate Map

Hate Map | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

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More Risk, but Less Fear, in Cities

More Risk, but Less Fear, in Cities | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

"This week's Boston Marathon bombing fit with the norm of U.S. terrorist events and threats in one important way: it occurred in a major city. American concerns about terrorism, however, seem to ignore that pattern...There’s a divide on people’s thoughts about terrorism. People that live in places most likely to be hit by terrorism seem the most sunny about the country’s anti-terror prospects and efforts. And those in rural places,  are more concerned and pessimistic."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 2013 2:01 PM

This article cites data from the PEW Reseach Center that implies that city dwellers seem to feel less dread about terror threats than their suburban and rural counterparts, despite the fact they live in the primary target zone (see full size infographic here--note that the data was assembled before the Boston Marathon attack).  


Question to Ponder: Why are the Americans most vulnerable to terrorist attacks the least concerned with terrorism? 

 

Tagsterrorism, statistics, USA, infographic, urban.

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A 'Ziggy' Path to the NFL

Ezekiel "Ziggy" Ansah's journey to the NFL, beginning as a walk-on to the Brigham Young University football team from Accra, Ghana, who had never played foot...

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Seth Dixon's comment, April 26, 2013 7:36 PM
I have (and forgot that's where the nugget of the 'hockey' idea came from). I just wish I had those cool glasses! Poor Eagles, Ziggy is ultimate high risk/high reward pick.
megan b clement's curator insight, October 13, 2013 12:30 AM

"The article discusses Ziggy who is orginally from Ghana who came to America and usually played soccer. As a result of coming to America and his profound athletic ability adjusted to the American tradition of playing football one of America's number one past times. He came into a foreign country and not only made it his home but made football a challlenge he was going to conquere. It was not always easy but with the talent, right tools, and the right people to inspire and push him he is one of the best players in 2013."

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 31, 2013 1:53 PM

The story of Ziggy is a great one; it not only shows how hard work and perseverance pay off, but also the importance of cultural diffusion. After hearing how ziggy grew up it was clear that he had some natural athletic talent, but with out the ability to come to school in America he would have never had a chance to explore his football abilities. I liked how in the video they showed a clip of him talking to the head coach when he first asked to play and he said, “ You know this isn’t soccer.” And Ziggy responded by saying, “Yes I understand but if you give me a chance I believe I can do well.”

This just shows how much geography can limit possibilities, Ziggy had never even had the opportunity to try out, train or play football from a young age. I guess it all kind of reminds me of how America is really a land of opportunities, and how a sophomore at BYU with no prior football experience can go to being the 2013 number five overall draft pick in the NHL.

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New York's Changing Skyline

New York's Changing Skyline | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 26, 2013 3:55 PM

I love this visualization of New York City's evolving skyline from 1876-2013.  The urban landscape of America's prominent cities has changed dramatically. 


Tags: historical,urbanarchitecture, landscape, NYC.

Louis Culotta's comment, May 1, 2013 11:32 AM
I wonder if the tallest building in the first picture is the first stage of the Brooklyn Bridge??????
Louis Culotta's curator insight, May 1, 2013 11:35 AM

if you look at the first picture...it looks like the tall building on the water could be the first stage of the Brooklyn Bridge...any suggestions to this?