Human Geography CP
Follow
Find
152 views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Ami Zach from Geography Education
onto Human Geography CP
Scoop.it!

Population 7 Billion

Population 7 Billion | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

"Just 200 years ago, there were only 1 billion people on the planet, and over the next 150 years, that number grew to 3 billion. But in the past 50 years, the global population has more than doubled, and the UN projects that it could possibly grow to 15 billion by the year 2100. As the international organization points out, this increasing rate of change brings with it enormous challenges."

 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Roman Mirando's curator insight, September 10, 9:17 AM

At first, the world's population did not grow a lot. Now we are growing about 1 billion in 12 years, that is scary compared to the 200 years we grew about 1 billion. These are some pictures of some highly dense populations. It is even scarier that in 2100 the population is suspected to be 15 billion.

jada_chace's curator insight, September 10, 9:25 AM

Over the years our world population has grown enormously. Almost  200 years ago there was only 1 billion people in the world, and as time went on the population started to increase dramatically. By 2100, geographers say the population will grow to be 150 million people in the world. The population continues to grow throughout time, we therefore should be cautious on how we are to our environment.

Robert Hardy Simpkins's curator insight, September 10, 9:29 AM

The fact that in just 86 years we will have 15 billion people in our world is a very scary thought.will we have enough resources to account for all the people on Earth. Will there be multiple diseases killing people off. Our population needs to be controlled.

From around the web

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Ami Zach from AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
Scoop.it!

Dozens Of Countries Take In More Immigrants Per Capita Than The U.S.

Dozens Of Countries Take In More Immigrants Per Capita Than The U.S. | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
While the United States has the most total foreign-born residents, they make up a higher percentage of the population in most European countries and some Gulf states, as well as Canada and Australia.

Via Allison Anthony
more...
Emily Bian's curator insight, November 1, 8:56 PM

United States has a lot of foreign born people, about 45.7 million, but is ranked only #65 in terms of percent of population being born as a foreign. While a bunch of people from the United States think that all immigrants want to move to the US, there are a lot more countries out there that have a bunch more immigrants. The US populations is about 15% immigrants, while New Zealand is about 25%. That's a lot of people! 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 2, 11:08 AM

unit 2

Rescooped by Ami Zach from AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
Scoop.it!

Which of the 11 American nations do you live in?

Which of the 11 American nations do you live in? | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
A fascinating new look at the cultural differences between the 11 nations that make up North America.

Via Allison Anthony
more...
Rescooped by Ami Zach from AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
Scoop.it!

Six Ways America Is Like a Third-World Country

Six Ways America Is Like a Third-World Country | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Our society lags behind the rest of the developed world in education, health care, violence and more

Via Allison Anthony
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ami Zach from AP Human Geography
Scoop.it!

18 "Geography Fail" Media Gaffes

18 "Geography Fail" Media Gaffes | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Maps are hard. Not that hard, though.

Via Seth Dixon, Courtney Barrowman
more...
Jamie Strickland's curator insight, September 9, 2:28 PM

Yet another resource to add to my "this is why we take map quizzes" lecture at the beginning of the semester!!

Nancy Watson's curator insight, September 14, 11:33 AM

Unit 1 Geography Nature and Perspective. These people need perspective and a Geography course or two.

Scott Langston's curator insight, September 18, 8:05 PM

I like the 'not that hard, though' tag.

Rescooped by Ami Zach from Mrs. Watson's Class
Scoop.it!

Where Do Borders Need to Be Redrawn? - Room for Debate

Where Do Borders Need to Be Redrawn? - Room for Debate | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
“ What parts of the world should rethink their maps? Why and how?”
Via Seth Dixon, Nancy Watson
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 7, 11:28 AM

Maps are always changing as a new nation gets added and old lines cease to make sense. Territory is claimed and reclaimed.  This series of seven articles in the New York Times explores regional examples of how borders impacts places from a variety of scholarly perspectives.  Together, these article challenge student to reconsider the world map and to conceptualize conflicts within a spatial context.

 

Tags: bordersmapping, political, territoriality, sovereignty.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, July 16, 10:53 AM

WOW, some really interesting thoughtdebate points here! very very unit 4

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 7:05 PM

APHG-U4

Rescooped by Ami Zach from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Scoop.it!

Can’t stand the heat? Come to world’s first climate-controlled city

Can’t stand the heat? Come to world’s first climate-controlled city | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
“ Dubai has already earned a reputation for pushing the boundaries with its architecture, having built the world’s tallest building, a hotel shaped like a sail and a palm tree‑shaped archipelago of luxury properties.”
Via Suvi Salo, Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ami Zach from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Where Do Borders Need to Be Redrawn? - Room for Debate

Where Do Borders Need to Be Redrawn? - Room for Debate | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
What parts of the world should rethink their maps? Why and how?

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 7, 11:28 AM

Maps are always changing as a new nation gets added and old lines cease to make sense. Territory is claimed and reclaimed.  This series of seven articles in the New York Times explores regional examples of how borders impacts places from a variety of scholarly perspectives.  Together, these article challenge student to reconsider the world map and to conceptualize conflicts within a spatial context.

 

Tags: bordersmapping, political, territoriality, sovereignty.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, July 16, 10:53 AM

WOW, some really interesting thoughtdebate points here! very very unit 4

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 7:05 PM

APHG-U4

Rescooped by Ami Zach from Mrs. Watson's Class
Scoop.it!

15 Famous Landmarks Zoomed Out Tell a Bigger Story

15 Famous Landmarks Zoomed Out Tell a Bigger Story | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Context is everything.

Via Nancy Watson
more...
Nancy Watson's curator insight, April 24, 8:26 PM

Sometimes it is what you can't see that is important

Rescooped by Ami Zach from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Deadliest Animal in the World

The Deadliest Animal in the World | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Bill Gates introduces Mosquito Week on his personal blog, the Gates Notes. Everything posted this week is dedicated to this deadly creature. Mosquitoes carry devastating diseases like malaria, dengue fever, yellow fever, and encephalitis.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jacques Lebègue's curator insight, May 2, 3:13 AM

"C'est pas la p'tite bête qui manger la grosse". La manger, je ne sais pas, être le vecteur de son décès, c'est plus probable. Les moustiques et le paludisme tuent plus de personnes en 4min que les requins en un an!
On pourrait aussi drastiquement réduire le nombre de décès humains en désormais tous ces humains dotés d'une arme...

16s3d's curator insight, May 2, 3:51 AM

"C'est pas la p'tite bête qui manger la grosse". La manger, je ne sais pas, être le vecteur de son décès, c'est plus probable. Les moustiques et le paludisme tuent plus de personnes en 4min que les requins en un an!
On pourrait aussi drastiquement réduire le nombre de décès humains en désormais tous ces humains dotés d'une arme...

Fathie Kundie's curator insight, May 5, 11:08 AM

ما هو المخلوق الأشد فتكا في العالم؟

Rescooped by Ami Zach from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Economic Decline and Sense of Place

"McDowell County, situated in the coalfields of West Virginia, has experienced a great boom-and-bust since 1950. But despite the economic decline and population loss, many still call it home and feel a great sense of purpose among the mountains. Residents speak about their connection to this place and the meaning of 'home.' Hear more stories at hollowdocumentary.com "


Via Seth Dixon
more...
dilaycock's curator insight, April 29, 6:51 PM

Excellent example of urban decline. Would pair nicely with a reading from 'Rocket Boys' by Homer Hickam Jnr, or with the movie version 'October Sky.' The book and movie are the true story of a boy in Coalwood, West Virginia in the 1950s who is determined to  "escape" working in the coal mines to become a rocket scientist.

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, September 16, 11:02 PM

 McDowell, a once thriving county in the 1950’s ceased to keep up with the ever-chaning world. There was little need for coal after the 1980’s so work became scarce and the “Brain Drain” began. Those looking for a successful future left for there was more choice elsewhere and economically it would make no sense to stay in McDowell. Nevertheless, cultural upbringings paved way to this "Boom and Bust” town, which gave people a sense of place and identity. Though McDowell is economically on the decline the communal relations and sense of place the community holds is still strong. 

Luke Walker's curator insight, October 3, 3:41 AM

Develop your sense of place regarding the coalfields of West Virginia.

What geographic context (location) might create a place like McDowell County, West Virginia?

Rescooped by Ami Zach from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why Geography?

Why Geography? | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

"Geography. It lets you study the world. No, really, THE WORLD. Think about that. What other subject deals with rocks? Moving continents? AND climate? Diffusion of plants and animals? Water quality? Now, what if you add some human systems--do the other sciences let you relate the earth to economic or political systems? And culture--food, religion, music, housing, or language? How about urban systems and settlement forms? Past, present, and future, anywhere in the world? And how many subject areas let you look at something from a scientific, social-scientific, humanistic, AND artistic perspective? Yeah, I said artistic--I like to illustrate my findings with a nice map.

Tell me all about global studies or environmental science if you'd like--they're alright too. But NOTHING lets you see the world like geography does."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 11:17 AM

This 'sermon' from the Church of Geography is outstanding (the 'Church' is a geo-evangelizing group on Facebook and Twitter that is the home to the delightful memes pictured above).  Many organizations are trying to re-brand geography to gain greater public support at the same time that other interdisciplinary initiatives with geographic content are gaining traction: global studies, environmental sustainability, centers for spatial analysis, etc.  We don't need a name change as much as we need people to capture the vision of geography's centrality and holistic capacity. 


Tags: geo-inspiration, geography education.

Emily Bian's curator insight, October 3, 5:20 PM

This scoop caught my eye because of all the cartoons and memes. Some of them are pretty funny geography puns, and I'm sure other people will enjoy this.

There is world and human geography, and I have already learned world geography. World Geography has already helped me learn a lot about the world around me. Before, I was very illiterate in maps, but now I'm pretty decent. I can't wait to learn more in human geography! 

Rescooped by Ami Zach from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

10 All-American Foods That Foreigners Can't Stand

10 All-American Foods That Foreigners Can't Stand | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Red velvet cake does not sit well with many foreigners. They dislike it because it is packed with chemicals and food coloring. Many think that is tastes bland and that the only flavor coming through is the artificial coloring taste. They would much prefer a true chocolate or vanilla cake.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Joy Kinley's curator insight, April 3, 10:19 AM

Culture determines what food that you eat.  American foods are a blend of different cultures as well as convenience products.  The convenience foods are full of different chemicals and perservatives that alter the flavor of foods. 

Even for foods that we think would taste the same like chocolate there is a large difference in taste.  I agree that some of the things like grits or biscuits and gravy would seem odd if you hadn't grown up with them.  Red Velvet Cake (the only part I like about it is the Cream Cheese Icing) has a chemcial taste as does the cheese products, such as cheese in a can.

However just as foreigners don't like some American foods some foreign foods taste equally strange to Americans, even things that seem that they would taste the same such as soft drinks in other countries. 

However Peanut Butter and Jelly is wonderful (it is difficult to find peanut butter in many countries) but I agree that European chocolate is much tastier.

Mr. David Burton's comment, April 5, 7:55 PM
But I oh so love everything on this list ... pfff :-)
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 28, 10:45 AM

unit 3 & Unit 5

Rescooped by Ami Zach from AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
Scoop.it!

Population, Sustainability, and Malthus: Crash Course World History 215 - YouTube

In which John Green teaches you about population. So, how many people can reasonably live on the Earth? Thomas Malthus got it totally wrong in the 19th centu...

Via Allison Anthony
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ami Zach from AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
Scoop.it!

Remittance Flows Worldwide in 2012

Remittance Flows Worldwide in 2012 | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Track the flows of remittances worldwide in the year 2012 with this interactive.

Via Allison Anthony
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ami Zach from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Too rich for its own good

Too rich for its own good | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
The Democratic Republic of Congo is potentially one of the richest countries on earth, but colonialism, slavery and corruption have turned it into one of the poorest

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 10, 10:13 AM

Democratic Republic of Congo

Jennifer Brown's curator insight, November 10, 11:25 AM

This baffles me! To have all of these riches but still be the poorest country on earth. I guess greed destroys everything!  From the slave traders to the blood diamonds, something needs to change.  

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, November 17, 7:09 PM

This is a very good information for those people who do not know the situation in DR Congo (I include myself). Is very sad to see these kind of things or situation. The DR Congo is one of the richest countries on earth, but because of the colonialism , slavery and CORRUPTION have turned it into one of the poorest. This article mentions that there is a war in which at least more than 5 million of people have died. This historian, Dan Snow , is telling us how awful in the situation in DR Congo. In the end of this article, he answer many question made by the public, but the last question was the one that I find interesting. the question says if he could pick just one thing to change in Congo, what would be, he answer "The rule of law. People need protection when rights are violated, to start businesses and to find out where the money goes." I think that if that happen, life in DR Congo will be better.

Rescooped by Ami Zach from AP Human Geography
Scoop.it!

The Language of Maps Kids Should Know

The Language of Maps Kids Should Know | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
The vocabulary and concepts of maps kids should learn to enhance their map-skills & geography awareness. Concise definitions with clear illustrations.

Via Allison Anthony, Courtney Barrowman
more...
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 12, 11:09 AM

course intro resource

Rescooped by Ami Zach from Regional Geography
Scoop.it!

50 Cities You Should See In Your Lifetime

50 Cities You Should See In Your Lifetime | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
“With our ever-expanding bucket lists, it's sometimes easy to lose sight of the essentials. Well, we've gone to the community of travelers at minube.net with a simple goal: find the greatest destinations on Earth. From the great ancient capitals to t...”
Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 8, 1:37 PM

Because nothing beats seeing the world.  I've been to 9 of these cities and am eager to see many more.  How many have you been to?  What cities would you add to this list? 

MReese Geo's curator insight, July 10, 10:17 AM

Only been to one city on this list and it was Las Vegas but would LOVE to vist pretty much all of these cities.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 7:04 PM

APG-MAPS

Rescooped by Ami Zach from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

Ramadan in Sweden with no dusk, no dawn

Ramadan in Sweden with no dusk, no dawn | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
“During summer, the sun never sets in Sweden's northernmost town, posing challenges for Muslims observing the holy month.”
Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 8, 12:29 PM

Like many early religious traditions, Ramadan is observed based on measurements from the moon and sun. The start of Ramadan is determined by the sighting of the new moon, which  moves about 11 days back in the Gregorian calendar each year. During Ramadan the consumption of food and water is prohibited between dawn and dusk, how do Muslims observing the fast manage in the far north of Scandinavia, where the sun never sets?  When Ramadan falls in December, however, Muslims will face the opposite of midnight sun: polar night. For two weeks, the sun does not rise above the horizon.

Rescooped by Ami Zach from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

France to redraw nation's map to save money

France to redraw nation's map to save money | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

"France's administrative regions — Normandy, Alsace, Burgundy, etc. — have long been part of the identity of citizens of this diverse country. Now, merging some of them is seen as a logical way to save money on bureaucracy, and the French support it — as long as it's someone else's turf."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jordan Schemmel's curator insight, May 21, 1:04 PM

How countries identify smaller administrative regions is crucial to understanding both how they are governed, and how these regions impact cultural differences.

Kampe Kyle's curator insight, May 28, 10:18 PM

In AP Human Geo., this article relates to the theme of redistricting and political reapportionment because it involves the redrawing of geographic boundaries within a country in order to facilitate a certain political and economic outcome.

Joy Kinley's curator insight, June 16, 3:28 PM

It is amazing that people are all for redrawing and redistricting until it impacts them.  This is a touchy subject in the United States with some small towns and communities merging even though they only have decades of identity not centuries.  If these merges happen in France I see that there will be many strikes and protests and when it is over everyone still would maintain what they would call their "real identity" not what France gave them.  

Rescooped by Ami Zach from Social Media Classroom
Scoop.it!

Kindergarten show canceled so kids can keep studying to become ‘college and career ready.’ Really.

Kindergarten show canceled so kids can keep studying to become ‘college and career ready.’ Really. | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

"An annual year-end kindergarten show has been canceled at a New York school because the kids have to keep working so they will be “college and career” ready. Really.

That’s what it says in a letter (see below) sent to parents by Ellen Best-Laimit, the interim principal of Harley Avenue Primary School in Elwood, N.Y., and four kindergarten teachers. The play was to be staged over two days, May 14 and 15, according to the school’s calendar."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 28, 3:21 PM

I'm all for education and promote our children to be college ready.  I promise you that the only things that I remember from Kindergarten (that matter) are good feelings about learning and a sense of accomplishment.  My handwriting was woefully sloppy, but I'm glad that didn't mean I could go out to play in playground and slap some paint on a butcher paper.  The painting didn't help me get 'college ready' since I've no artistic training, but it was fun.  Early education need to not lose sight of it's primary goal; have fun and let the kids learn how to learn.  What they learn can be saved for another day.  Teach kids to dread school when they are 5 and you've created jaded 6-year-olds. 

Rescooped by Ami Zach from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

News Literacy: Critical-Thinking Skills for the 21st Century

News Literacy: Critical-Thinking Skills for the 21st Century | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

"Every teacher I've worked with over the last five years recalls two kinds of digital experiences with students.The first I think of as digital native moments, when a student uses a piece of technology with almost eerie intuitiveness. The second I call digital naiveté moments, when a student trusts a source of information that is obviously unreliable. How can these coexist? How can students be so technologically savvy while also displaying their lack of basic skills for navigating the digital world?"


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 28, 4:00 PM

This is a nice article with some practical advice but it also can that helps us conceptualize the thinking skills that our students are going to need in the future (with a classic photo that embodies 20th century news literacy).  Previously, I've written on this same topic, with some strategies to how to help students assess the validity of online information with geographic content (with a series of maps and images).  I know I've been duped before, and it's okay to admit that to your students; but we need to teach students how to be critical readers as they are swimming in an ocean of digital information of variable quality.  This is why I see content curation as an important part of modern education; it is a way to teach student the tools to assess the quality of information for themselves.  They will be gathering, organizing and synthesizing digital information for rest of their lives.        

Linda Dougherty's curator insight, August 12, 12:41 AM
3 ideas to incorporate News Literacy into the classroom while guiding students into evaluating news articles and media.
Rescooped by Ami Zach from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Globalization and the Textile Industry

"On the 100th anniversary of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire, little has changed in the global sweatshop economy. Workers are again trapped and burned to death behind locked exit gates."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kelly Collinsworth's curator insight, April 16, 8:42 AM

For Beth Manor

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 24, 11:28 AM

unit 6

Danielle Bellefeuille's curator insight, May 10, 6:16 PM

The sad reality of the new division of labor, we are moving backwards instead of forwards with labor policies and widening the gap between core and periphery countries. We need to stand up and advocate for fair trade. These countries rely on us for sources of unemployment, and we need to give them better wages, safer working conditions, and help them push pass this dependency, and grow into more economically and socially strong countries.

 

http://www.laborrights.org

Rescooped by Ami Zach from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How the Potato Changed the World

How the Potato Changed the World | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Brought to Europe from the New World by Spanish explorers, the lowly potato gave rise to modern industrial agriculture

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 1:38 PM

Potatoes were very important in the Colombian Exchange, which was the exchange of plants and animals to and from different lands where they are not native to.  Today, the potato is the fifth most important crop in the world.  Food is deeply routed in culture and this massive exchange changed societies.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 11:41 PM

Potatoes were brought to the New World through the Columbian Exchange. It does have a negative connotation but the trade route was used to diffuse cultures by trading food. 

Gina Panighetti's curator insight, August 4, 5:35 PM

Columbian Exchange Unit

Rescooped by Ami Zach from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

Japan banned from Antarctic whaling

Japan banned from Antarctic whaling | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
The UN's International Court of Justice rules that Japan must temporarily halt its whaling programme in the Antarctic.

 

It agreed with Australia, which brought the case in May 2010, that the  programme was not for scientific research as claimed by Tokyo. Japan said it would abide by the decision but added it "regrets and is deeply  disappointed by the decision". Australia argued that the programme was commercial whaling in disguise. The court's decision is considered legally binding. Japan had argued that the suit brought by Australia was an attempt to impose its cultural norms on Japan.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.