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RSA Animate - Drive: The surprising truth about what motivates us

This lively RSA Animate, adapted from Dan Pink's talk at the RSA, illustrates the hidden truths behind what really motivates us at home and in the workplace....

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Ruth Bomar's curator insight, December 14, 2012 9:27 AM

Decisions college students face daily:  go to class, finish a paper, read the assignment. Where does the power come from to follow through with all those good and right intentions? Watch this video and learn about yourself.

From around the web

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Geography Soup

"A great resource full of great links to accompany the Geography Soup channel on Vimeo."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 3, 2014 7:19 PM

Geography Soup is a Vimeo channel designed to include interesting videos that are laden with geographic content in them.  This powerpoint slideshow has resources designed to help you get the most flavor and substance out of these (and any other) video resources.  This is especially great for K-12 students, physical and regional geography.


Tags: K12, video.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 2014 11:22 PM

Course resource

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How Watermelons Became a Racist Trope

How Watermelons Became a Racist Trope | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Before its subversion in the Jim Crow era, the fruit symbolized black self-sufficiency.

 

The stereotype that African Americans are excessively fond of watermelon emerged for a specific historical reason and served a specific political purpose. The trope came into full force when slaves won their emancipation during the Civil War. Free black people grew, ate, and sold watermelons, and in doing so made the fruit a symbol of their freedom. Southern whites, threatened by blacks’ newfound freedom, responded by making the fruit a symbol of black people’s perceived uncleanliness, laziness, childishness, and unwanted public presence. This racist trope then exploded in American popular culture, becoming so pervasive that its historical origin became obscure."

 

Tags: culture, racism, historical.


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13 Yiddish Words We All Say

13 Yiddish Words We All Say | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Here are 13 Yiddish words we all say. How many of them do you use in your daily conversation?

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Tori Denney's curator insight, March 23, 11:29 PM
language and communications - Languages have shifted throughout the years and created many slang words to communicate. English is the Lingua Franca of the world, but has grown up from many other branches of languages. We use many everyday expressions from unusual sources, for example the Yiddish language. This language was the primary language to the Ashkenzazi Jews, and is today, only a primary language spoken by select groups of ultra-Orthodox Jews. For example, we often use the word "glitch" or "glitsh" (literally meaning “slip,” “skate,” or “nosedive,” which was the origin of the common American usage as “a minor problem”), plus many others from all kinds of varying languages.
Ryan Tibari's curator insight, March 24, 9:35 AM

Unit 3:

This article applies language families to all the languages spoken in the world. All languages share similar origins, therefore they share words, phrases, and organization patterns. By reading this list, you may even notice some words you use without knowing anything about the language or the origin of it. 

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"We are humans too." - Films from Survival International

"We are humans too." - Films from Survival International | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Guarani Leader Eliseu Lopes describes his tribe's quest to return to their ancestral land.

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The fall — and overhaul — of the American mall

The fall — and overhaul — of the American mall | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Instead of abandoning once-thriving suburban malls, owners are sinking millions into risky redevelopments.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, February 1, 12:27 PM

Malls -ghettoization to Gentrification?  Urban Unit. 

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Big increase in surgery to mend ‘flesh tunnel’ earlobes

Big increase in surgery to mend ‘flesh tunnel’ earlobes | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
The price of fashion: £1,800 to rebuild ears stretched by fashion

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 20, 2014 12:35 PM

What is culturally accepted in some circles and places, might be frowned upon in others.  Some twenty-somethings are realizing that corporate culture can be less forgiving about expressions of individuality than their friends were in high school.  What are some places that demand certain appearances?  How do you feel about these cultural norms and how they are informally enforced?

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Spot the Africa

Spot the Africa | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Trevor Noah joins The Best F#@king News Team Ever and challenges Jon to a game of Spot the Africa.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 6, 2014 3:24 PM

This has some very entertaining criticism, noting the problems in how Americans think about the continent of Africa...starting with the fact that we often treat it was one huge monolithic continent. 

Adriene Mannas's curator insight, December 12, 2014 11:09 AM

Unit 1 Nature and Perspectives of Geography

Stran smith's curator insight, March 22, 7:54 PM

Africa

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The Lost Boys, part one - YouTube

Share your videos with friends, family, and the world

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World Population Will Soar Higher Than Predicted

World Population Will Soar Higher Than Predicted | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
World population will hit nearly 11 billion by 2100

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India's Potty Problem

India's Potty Problem | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

Which statement is true? 

 

A. 60% of all households without toilets in the world are in India.
B. India’s Muslims are less affected by the sanitation problem than Hindus.
C. India’s lack of toilets is worse than China’s.
D. Lack of toilets in India puts women at especially high risk.


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Brett Laskowitz's curator insight, April 19, 7:41 PM

Excellent article for sparking discussion on the costs of development.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 22, 6:37 PM

Unfathomable to see that all of these are true, but at the same time not unbelievable.  I can see sanitation problems being relevant wherever there is overpopulation in the world.  Especially here where Muslims are defecating outside as a part of ritual, you wonder if they would use toilets even if they had them.  India is lucky they don't have some disease running ram,pant that can kill large portions of their population in a hurry like the plague in England.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, April 24, 10:48 AM

In America, this story is not fathomable.  The sanitation problem in India goes beyond cultural norms, in my opinion.  I think it is evident of an infrastructure that is way behind the country's socioeconomic level of growth.  It seems like finally, after electing a new prime minister, that there will be much focus brought on the issue.  It also seems that if they don't shore up this sanitation issue that they will have a bigger epidemic on their hands, as there have been recent murders and rapes of young women in these sanitation fields.

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Feeding Our Hungry Planet

"By 2050, the world's population will likely increase 35 percent. But is growing more food the only option—or even the best? National Geographic investigates the challenges and solutions to feeding everyone on our planet, based on an eight-month series in National Geographic magazine. Visit http://natgeofood.com for ongoing coverage of food issues as we investigate the Future of Food today on World Food Day." Tags: sustainability, agriculture, food production, unit 5 agriculture.


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Truthbehere2's curator insight, October 17, 2014 10:30 AM

I think I might as well buy some land and plant my own huge garden for this crap coming up and have a fence around my yard too

Nancy Watson's curator insight, October 19, 2014 8:53 AM

Population increase is just part of the story. How do we feed everyone? How will we provide for the needs of everyone?  Can the earth sustain the use of her resources and the impact of our growing needs and output. First we must eat. Can we learn to do that wisely? 

Bella Reagan's curator insight, November 28, 2014 5:48 PM

Unit 2-Population

 

This video was about the growing population in the world and as a result the growing food demand. This video points out that even though more food production seems like the solution, instead other solutions are more logical. Solutions include reducing wastes, preserving forests, being more productive on current farms and more. It states that farming is a huge business but it goes towards more than growing food for people to eat but also for other things like animals and materials. The worlds population is growing and there needs to be a change in food industries to keep thriving. 

 

This relates to unit 2 about population since it is thinking of ways to adapt to the worlds growing population. By 2050 it is predicted that population will increase by 33% and something has to change about food in order for people to stay fed. There is too much food being wasted that if that could be decreased it could make a huge difference. The video made a good point that it's not that we need more food it's that we need to manage and prioritize production.  

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Defining 'the South'

Defining 'the South' | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
"The Southerners were considerably more certain of which states are their own. While the top few Midwest states barely pulled 80 percent of the vote, nearly 90 percent of respondents identified Georgia and Alabama as Southern, and more than 80 percent placed Mississippi and Louisiana in the South. South Carolina, Tennessee, Florida and North Carolina all garnered above 60 percent."
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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 15, 2014 12:22 PM

When I think about the South, I do so in terms of culture. The "southern life style" that I have is extremely warped by being a resident of New England for so long. But when I consider what the South is I usually include the south eastern states until the top portion of Florida. As well as Virginia, Oklahoma, Kansas, and North Eastern Texas. Although Texas seems like it would be the quintessential example of the South, much of the state has a Latin influence that I do not associate with Southern culture.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, November 1, 2014 10:40 PM

When I think of states that constitute as being a part of southern United States, I think of VA, NC, SC, GA, MS, AL, LA, TX, and FL. I never thought of KY as being a state a part of the south. Although its geographical location demonstrate it being relatively close to being in the south, I always thought of KY being a Midwest because of the weather similarities with states that are located in the Midwest.

Miles Gibson's curator insight, November 22, 2014 8:08 PM

Unit 1 nature and perspective of geography 

This map is a map of the p.o.v. of a surveyed group stating what they think the south is. They answered with suprising accuracy overall with some outliers. This map shows the stereotypes of the area that people deem it.

This relates to unit 1 because it shows a perceptual map of an area that isn't truly defined. This is a perceptual map because of its undefined borders and a level of accuracy at the personal level.

 

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Dozens Of Countries Take In More Immigrants Per Capita Than The U.S.

Dozens Of Countries Take In More Immigrants Per Capita Than The U.S. | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
While the United States has the most total foreign-born residents, they make up a higher percentage of the population in most European countries and some Gulf states, as well as Canada and Australia.

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Emily Bian's curator insight, November 1, 2014 8:56 PM

United States has a lot of foreign born people, about 45.7 million, but is ranked only #65 in terms of percent of population being born as a foreign. While a bunch of people from the United States think that all immigrants want to move to the US, there are a lot more countries out there that have a bunch more immigrants. The US populations is about 15% immigrants, while New Zealand is about 25%. That's a lot of people! 

2) Consequences of migration: socioeconomic, cultural, environmental, and political; immigration policies; remittances

Because of so many immigrants, US has built a physical barrier between them and Mexico. This hurts social ties and the environment as well. It causes many negative feelings.

If an illegal immigrant is caught in the US, then they are sent back. Sometimes they may even be arrested. 

This will help future APHUG students by getting background knowledge on where US stands in immigration. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 2, 2014 11:08 AM

unit 2

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Here's What the World Would Look Like—If Maps Were Based on Population - TakePart

Here's What the World Would Look Like—If Maps Were Based on Population - TakePart | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
A Reddit user creates a map showing just how big Asia is and, well, how small everything else is.

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Worldwide Country Comparison

Worldwide Country Comparison | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

"MyLifeElsewhere allows you to compare your home country with different countries around the world. Ever wonder what your life would be like if you were born somewhere else?"


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HG Académie de Rennes's curator insight, January 31, 1:56 AM

Un site d'une grande simplicité d'utilisation bien qu'en anglais. Le principe est de choisir deux pays dans un menu déroulant pour en comparer les principaux indicateurs de développement sous la forme de petites infographies très pédagogiques.
La comparaison est évidemment un processus de raisonnement à mettre en place pour situer et caractériser en géographie. On songera ainsi à l'utilisation d'un tel outil dans le cadre de l'étude des inégalités de développement en classe de 5e et de Seconde, mais aussi pour une mise en perspective sur les Territoires dans la mondialisation en classe de 4e afin de caractériser un PMA, un pays émergent, un pays développé (cf. exemple réalisé pour l'illustration).

Dernière information sur ce site, les statistiques utilisées proviennent des bases de données open source de la CIA américaine.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, February 7, 7:51 PM

After studying this comparison tool and using it to find the best of the best and worst of the worst, I picked out some highlights I'd like to share. Monaco is clearly the place to be born, earn, and live. When compared to the USA, the infant mortality rate is 71% less, the life expectancy is 10 years longer @ 84, and you'll earn 62% more money, no doubt because you have ten more years in which to do so. I believe the stats may be skewed a bit in this country comparison as the very rich live there and they have access to the best medical care, and probably don't have very many infants with them when they make the move from elsewhere, hence the low infant mortality rate. Austria is not a bad second choice as you are 33% less likely to be unemployed. On a sobering note, the life expectancy if you live in Namibia is only 52! Yikes, I'm already 53... It's far worse however in Swaziland. The life expectancy is sadly only 50.5 years and you are 44 times more likely to have AIDS than if you lived here. 26.5% of the population has AIDS! Be thankful for where you live and stop complaining, it's far worse on average in nearly all other countries.

Monika Fleischmann's curator insight, February 15, 4:59 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

Did you know that with 1/30th the territory of the United States, Norway still has over 25% more coastline?  I didn't either until I compared Norway to the United States using My Life Elsewhere.  This site is designed allow United States students to imagine how their lives might be different if they were born in a different part of the world.  Students would probably die 21 years earlier if they were born in Liberia and 11 times more likely to have died in infancy.   Students would be 43.8% less likely to grow up and be unemployed and have 36.3% less babies if they were born in Taiwan.  This side-by-side format is a great way to help students help make these statistics real and meaningful.  One major drawback: this site only allows users to compare a country to the United States.  If you prefer to have students compare, say Cuba to the United Arab Emirates, I would recommend that you try If It Where My Home. 


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This map shows which is the deadliest infectious disease where you live

This map shows which is the deadliest infectious disease where you live | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
'Tuberculosis' and 'AIDS' aren't trending on Twitter, but they probably should be.

Via Mr. David Burton
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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, February 9, 1:34 PM

look at this map

Savannah Rains's curator insight, March 24, 12:19 AM

This article was written to depict the worlds most deadly diseases. Popular assumption about world diseases is that HIV/AIDS is only bad in Africa, when we think of aids we typically think of Africa. When using examining skills to further look at the geospatial data that this map gives, the observer can see that these diseases are everywhere and are killing a lot more people than you think. The world health organization gathered up the data to create this educational map for the public to finally realize that more attention should be paid to the pressing issues of the world. I enjoyed this article because it allowed me to look at a map and think about the geospatial reasons as to why the diseases are so bad in some places and not the other.

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Folk Culture--Tradition


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Dennis Swender's curator insight, February 3, 3:29 AM

Provides additional insight into modernity and primordialism concepts found in the Banks text.

Danielle Lip's curator insight, February 16, 7:34 PM

While watching this movie I found the over idea of tradition to be quite accurate because everyone wether they are from Russia, the United States or another country has traditions that come from many years ago. These traditions tell how the people should dress, sleep, work and eat all in the eyes of God. Traditions come from a group and then are passed on for generations, everyone has some type of tradition wether it is in their family or in another community. Tradition helps the people to gain an identity for themselves so he knows and everybody else knows who he is as well as what God expects. The main focus in this movie is not only tradition but also to please and have God in mind at all cost.

Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 22, 9:18 PM

This video was nice because it had a little song that played and I thought that it showed the culture well. Before the Industrial Revolution played out, this way the way it used to be in many places. Riding horses and pulling a wooden carriage to deliver milk that had been freshly squeezed from a cow. It's funny to think that this was't that long ago and how culture can change quickly.

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New Zealand's Wild Haka

ESPN Video: In the USA-New Zealand FIBA matchup, the USA players are very confused by New Zealand's pregame Haka.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 3, 2014 9:03 AM

I've enjoyed the Haka, a ritualized war dance that the New Zealand teams often perform just before a match (and can't we argue that sports a form of ritualized warfare?).  The clash of cultural contexts is  of New Zealand and Team USA is what makes this video work for me. 

MsPerry's curator insight, September 6, 2014 4:37 PM

APHG-U3

Sarah Mahoney's curator insight, October 9, 2014 8:14 PM

Great example of cultural diversity

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Today’s key fact: you are probably wrong about almost everything

Today’s key fact: you are probably wrong about almost everything | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Most people around the world are pretty bad when it comes to knowing the numbers behind the news. But how issues such as immigration are perceived can shape political opinion and promote misconceptions

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Immigation in the United States

Immigation in the United States | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

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Flaviu Fesnic's comment, December 7, 2014 2:25 PM
It's a tough job entering US ! I legally (of course ) tried ten years ago ! The US emabassy in Bucharest refused to give me a visa ! it's so frustrating ! no reason why ...
Adriene Mannas's curator insight, December 12, 2014 11:09 AM

Unit 2 Population

 

This picture shows the different ways to enter the country as an immigrant and how long it takes. There are many steps required and without some of these qualifications an immigrant can not legally get into the United States.  The picture makes a clear picture of how many people don't often even make it to the country. 

 

This relates to the population of Human Geography because often a large part of a countries population is made up of immigrants. Without them many cultures would not exist in other countries and a lot more people would die due to prejudices in former countries or war.  

Tori Denney's curator insight, March 24, 1:22 AM

Migrating - Whether you are a refugee, an internally displaced person or just seeking a better lifestyle, migrating countries is extremely difficult. This picture shares a little bit of truth about how hard and picky the United States system is about getting a green card or becoming a citizen of the United States is. The system takes into consideration, your family, your working skill, your relationships with others, and no matter what the circumstances, there's a minimum of a 6 year wait.

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Mexico Has Brutally Choked Off The Flow Of Undocumented Immigrants Into The U.S.

Mexico Has Brutally Choked Off The Flow Of Undocumented Immigrants Into The U.S. | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

"Once a pit stop on the long, dangerous trail north to the U.S. border, Tenosique has become ground zero for a remarkably successful push to cut off the flow of undocumented immigrants into the United States."

 

Grupo Beta [in Mexico] was established to provide food and medical assistance to migrants moving through the country to the United States. With facilities across the country along migratory routes, migrants have long become accustomed to seeking out the organization for help.

But since July, activists said that Grupo Beta workers in Tabasco and other border states have begun turning migrants into law enforcement. Several migrants in Tabasco said they had been targeted by law enforcement officials minutes after seeking out mobile Grupo Beta units providing food and water near the border.  The plan had an almost immediate impact.


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Padriag John-David Mahoney's curator insight, January 29, 12:55 PM

I would think this is fantastic. I would by no means wish to stop legal immigration into the United States. However if a plan is put into action to stop or at least deter illegal immigrants ( or "illegal aliens" in the non politically correct terminology) then I am all for it. While immigration is obviously beneficial to the United States, illegal immigration is a detriment. I wish all the success for those in this group who act to curtail the flow of illegal immigrants not only to the United States, but elsewhere.

Michael Amberg's curator insight, March 23, 10:01 PM

This shows how even the country that migrants are coming from help prevent undocumented migrations.

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McDonald's International

McDonald's International | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:45 PM

We talk about McDonalds as a way of Americanizing the rest of the world. These foods show that it may still be the case but local culture is still infused and desired where McDonalds expands to.

Payton Sidney Dinwiddie 's curator insight, January 21, 9:40 PM

This shows that mmcdonals is a global industy . there are many mcdonalds everywhere they put a spin oncertain diishes to match their heritage like in japan instead of hamburger meat like we americans use the use crabs.It just really shows how far mcdonalds was changed from just starting in america to being featured all over the globe

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 22, 7:06 PM

I've lived and traveled to a few places especially Asia.  I've had the Ramen at McD's in Hawaii along with the Portugeuse sausage that comes with the big breakfast.  I've also experienced Japanese McD's.  It was nice to be able to find some of the regular food like a burger and fry at any McD's in the world, but I never ordered anything else. 

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What is Geography?


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Mr. Twining's curator insight, December 8, 2014 11:38 AM

A Prezi that explains what the subject of geography is and how its more than just memorizing areas on a map. Geography and geology are central subjects for environmental science so its important to know what geography is and to dismiss any misconceptions. 

Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 2, 5:57 PM

Great Prezi!

Flo Cuadra Scrofft's curator insight, March 21, 9:38 PM

This presentation talks about the misconceptions of geography and about what it really involves. Geographers describe and try to explain how locations interact and relate to one another; are arranged the way they are; and have become what they are now. They also use critical thinking to project what the world might look like in the future. As there's usually so many questions that have to be answered, geography is an interdisciplinary work, meaning that it is a blend of natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Geographers also develop other skills, such as mapping and graphing (spatial representation skills) and development of verbal concepts, frameworks and mathematical models (spatial theorizing skills). Geography, therefore, can be used to study many issues, such as climate change, sustainability, human rights, among others.

Reflection- as the presentation accurately shows, many people believe that geography is just about memorizing countries and our world's natural resources locations, but in reality, geography goes much deeper than that. Geography is about asking questions and trying to come out with the best answers in order to solve issues that can range from local usage of land to international security.

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Where in the World?

Where in the World? | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

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Fathie Kundie's curator insight, January 8, 10:03 AM

اختبار في الجغرافيا.. عبارة عن صور مأخوذة من الجو .. حاول التعرف على الدول والمدن

Brian Wilk's comment, January 31, 9:34 PM
This is Australia I think.
Henk Trimp's comment, February 1, 6:37 PM
It sure is!
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Feeding Our Hungry Planet

"By 2050, the world's population will likely increase 35 percent. But is growing more food the only option—or even the best? National Geographic investigates the challenges and solutions to feeding everyone on our planet, based on an eight-month series in National Geographic magazine. Visit http://natgeofood.com for ongoing coverage of food issues as we investigate the Future of Food today on World Food Day." Tags: sustainability, agriculture, food production, unit 5 agriculture.
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Truthbehere2's curator insight, October 17, 2014 10:30 AM

I think I might as well buy some land and plant my own huge garden for this crap coming up and have a fence around my yard too

Nancy Watson's curator insight, October 19, 2014 8:53 AM

Population increase is just part of the story. How do we feed everyone? How will we provide for the needs of everyone?  Can the earth sustain the use of her resources and the impact of our growing needs and output. First we must eat. Can we learn to do that wisely? 

Bella Reagan's curator insight, November 28, 2014 5:48 PM

Unit 2-Population

 

This video was about the growing population in the world and as a result the growing food demand. This video points out that even though more food production seems like the solution, instead other solutions are more logical. Solutions include reducing wastes, preserving forests, being more productive on current farms and more. It states that farming is a huge business but it goes towards more than growing food for people to eat but also for other things like animals and materials. The worlds population is growing and there needs to be a change in food industries to keep thriving. 

 

This relates to unit 2 about population since it is thinking of ways to adapt to the worlds growing population. By 2050 it is predicted that population will increase by 33% and something has to change about food in order for people to stay fed. There is too much food being wasted that if that could be decreased it could make a huge difference. The video made a good point that it's not that we need more food it's that we need to manage and prioritize production.