Human Geography CP
Follow
Find tag "economic"
140 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Ami Zach from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Economic Decline and Sense of Place

"McDowell County, situated in the coalfields of West Virginia, has experienced a great boom-and-bust since 1950. But despite the economic decline and population loss, many still call it home and feel a great sense of purpose among the mountains. Residents speak about their connection to this place and the meaning of 'home.' Hear more stories at hollowdocumentary.com "


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 17, 12:35 PM

This video perfectly exemplifies some key geographic ideas; sense of place, regional economic decline, migration and resource extraction.  This video would be great to shows students and then get them to analyze the geographic context that creates a place like McDowell County, West Virginia.  This will be a great addition to my Place-Based Geography Videos StoryMap.  


Tagseconomicplace, industry, location, migration, APHG, poverty, socioeconomic.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 24, 8:27 AM

units 1 & 7

dilaycock's curator insight, April 29, 3:51 PM

Excellent example of urban decline. Would pair nicely with a reading from 'Rocket Boys' by Homer Hickam Jnr, or with the movie version 'October Sky.' The book and movie are the true story of a boy in Coalwood, West Virginia in the 1950s who is determined to  "escape" working in the coal mines to become a rocket scientist.

Rescooped by Ami Zach from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Modern Slavery

Modern Slavery | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

"I recently saw this map in a Washington Post article about modern day slavery and was immediately was struck by the spatial extent and amount of slaves in today’s global economy.  As stated in that article, “This is not some softened, by-modern-standards definition of slavery. These 30 million people are living as forced laborers, forced prostitutes, child soldiers, child brides in forced marriages and, in all ways that matter, as pieces of property, chattel in the servitude of absolute ownership.”  This map shows some important spatial patterns that seem to correlate to economic and cultural factors."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 9:36 PM

For slavery to thrive you need a big business to produce goods for and a large amount of people to actually do the work for little or no pay. We can try to eliminate by having machines produce goods or paying the workers more and giving them better working conditions. Our spending habits are some what responsible because these slaves our producing our products for us for very cheap. 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 8:15 AM

In my opinion slavery is the worst possible living situation. id rather be be free but have no food suply than to be a slave. its dishearting to look at these numbers and see that 30 million people have to deal with the worst quality of live possible. but what sickens me the most is the lack of information we have been given about this though primary schools. In school we were taught about Lincoln freeing the slaves ans american slavery almost every year. But not a single time did they connect or even touch on that it is a massive problem in the world today. It was to the extend that for a few years i was mislead to thinking that Lincoln made this a slave free world, boy was i wrong. Slavery is revesable though, it can be countered by harser punishments and more restrictions on the slave owners. We could also do our best to make it so they bring in as little money as possible so they are forced to find a different occupation. 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 2:04 PM

MOdern Slavery is a huge problem throughtout the world and especially in Africa and surrounding sister countries. For example, in Africa this map shows us that the slave rate is more than .75 this indicates that there is a small percentage of the country that is not enslaved in some way. This is outrageous for the modern society to think of in todays world especially because as Americans we think of the slave trade and slavery being something that happened many years ago and then slavery was abloished and now nothing bad happens anymore well we couldn't be more WRONG! AMericans are mostly ingornat to the fact that although slavery is not announced in surronding counintents and countries does not mean that it doesn't exist. Another example of this is the Somali blood diamonds and how the children become toy-soldiers and are turned into rebels because if they dont they will be killed so this is the type of society where it is kill or me killed. These CHILDREN are trained to kill anyone and everyone who gets in their way; taken away from their families at a young age and then brainwashed into using their ignorance as bliss.

Rescooped by Ami Zach from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

After boom and bust, Sun Belt cities see glimmers again

After boom and bust, Sun Belt cities see glimmers again | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON -- With their economies and housing markets gaining strength, some of the nation's biggest boom-to-bust cities in the Sun Belt are starting to become magnets again, attracting a growing number of people primarily from the northern part...

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Rescooped by Ami Zach from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Peter Steffan's curator insight, October 9, 2013 1:51 PM

See attached video clips!

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 11:44 AM

It is very sad that people have to move to a polluted, crowded mess of a place in order to get a better life. The man says at the end that if they can make it work in Dhaka, they could make it work in any city but the beginning is too monumental to get over. I think that maybe some government control over the outer limits of the city and offering a place nearby with some resources may allow more control over the growth of the city at least temporarily.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 5:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Rescooped by Ami Zach from Advance Placement Human Geography
Scoop.it!

Asians outnumber Hispanics among new immigrants to U.S.

Asians outnumber Hispanics among new immigrants to U.S. | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
As immigration levels from Mexico have plunged, the number of new arrivals from Asia has increased.

 

Don't listen to the election year rhetoric about immigration policies if you want to understand the shifting demographic profile of immigrants entering the United States.  For years now, immigration from Latin America has been at incredibly low levels mainly from 1) limited job market in the U.S. (weakening the pull factor), 2) increased deportation (weakening the pull factor) and 3) a sharp drop in Mexican birth rates (weakening the push factor).  What other push and pull factors are influences this change in the demographic profile of migrants?   Considering that Asian migrants are more highly educated that the rest of the American population (and Hispanics have less education than the general U.S. population), how will this change the labor market within the different sectors of the economy?


Via Seth Dixon, Dennis V Thomas
more...
Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 9, 2012 8:46 AM
If you just listen to politicians you'd never get your facts straight. This here is a prime example of that. It can't hurt to have better educated immigrants, according to the statistics, but it may not be long before our citizens are crying out that the higher paying jobs are no longer in abundance. This could easily effect the demand for schooled and skilled job seekers, in an already damaged job market.
Brandon Murphy's comment, July 12, 2012 3:14 AM
It's not even just politicians that give you false data, media outlets such as FOX news would never reveal information like this. I agree Roland, there is absolutely nothing wrong with having a better educated immigrant population.
Rescooped by Ami Zach from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Immigration to U.S. From Mexico in Decline Amid Tough Economy

Immigration to U.S. From Mexico in Decline Amid Tough Economy | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
The number of Mexicans leaving for the United States is just about cancelled out by the number returning, according to statistics provided by the Mexican government.

 

Besides being an important (underreported) political fact, this new migratory pattern can lead to a good discussion of push and pull factors that lead to the geography of migration. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ami Zach from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Globalization and the Textile Industry

"On the 100th anniversary of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire, little has changed in the global sweatshop economy. Workers are again trapped and burned to death behind locked exit gates."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kelly Collinsworth's curator insight, April 16, 5:42 AM

For Beth Manor

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 24, 8:28 AM

unit 6

Danielle Bellefeuille's curator insight, May 10, 3:16 PM

The sad reality of the new division of labor, we are moving backwards instead of forwards with labor policies and widening the gap between core and periphery countries. We need to stand up and advocate for fair trade. These countries rely on us for sources of unemployment, and we need to give them better wages, safer working conditions, and help them push pass this dependency, and grow into more economically and socially strong countries.

 

http://www.laborrights.org

Rescooped by Ami Zach from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Detroit on the edge

Detroit on the edge | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Bob Simon reports on the decline of America's former industrial capital and the people determined to bring it back

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 16, 2013 5:32 PM

Detroit is the largest city to declare bankruptcy and more importantly the first major American city to essentially fail as a major metropolitan area.  Sections of the city are reminiscent of a post-apocalyptic bestselling novel:  80,000 buildings stand empty, 40% of the streetlights don’t work, and it routinely takes police one hour to respond to a 911 call.


Tags: urban, economic, industry, Detroit

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, November 19, 2013 9:21 AM

The Detroit "Renaissance"  is an interesting one to say the least. There is an obvious opportunity to lay the foundations for something new and bold after clearing the rubble that has become detroit. But who is going to be displaced once the rubble's cleared and the trendy cafes, art studios, and co-ops are erected? Who amongst the poor and already displaced will be held up high, encouraged, and supported to help create this new Detroit? Cutting costs from health care and pensions, from those who already live in this city and are struggling, doesn't sound particularly productive. Especially after referencing having posession of extremely valuable art pieces that could be sold off. This article really sheds a light on the pro's and con's that are associated in capital investment in a bankrupt and wartorn American city.

I don't think that the poor and hungry care about paint on a canvas. They need access to opportunity and the resources to seize it.

 

Rescooped by Ami Zach from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

If Economists Controlled The Borders

If Economists Controlled The Borders | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
What would the perfect immigration system look like? We asked three economists to dream big.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 19, 2013 11:30 AM

This is an intriguing podcast focused on how to best manage national borders if the only goal were to strengthen the economy (they center the conversatri on the United States).  These economists envision plans with more incentives to attract a labor force that is more highly-skilled is crucial to having a rational migration policy.  How how you manage the borders if you were in charge?  How would your plan strengthen the country?  

Rescooped by Ami Zach from Advance Placement Human Geography
Scoop.it!

Containerization Shaped Globalization

Sometimes a single unlikely idea can have massive impact across the world. Sir Harold Evans, the author of They Made America, describes how frustration drove...

 

The economies of scale that globalization depends on, relies on logistics and transportation networks that can handle this high-volume.  In a word, the container, as mundane as it may seem, facilitated the era within which we live today. 


Via Seth Dixon, Dennis V Thomas
more...
Blanca Bernabé García's curator insight, October 4, 2013 11:01 AM

Una amena historia de la globalización 

Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 7:06 AM
this video was probably the most interesting to me from class. it went to the root of this increase in shipping and broke it down to its bare structure and helped you see the true evolution of shipping around the world. starting from wooden ships traveling all the way around the southern tip of Brazil ending up stacking freight boats which travel through the panama canal. it went into depth about how the inventor of freight stacking thought of his idea. first by being a shipper himself but from a truck stand point and showed his evolution to designing to doing to mastering. now this idea and method is the only and fastest way for all shipping routes from Asia to americas from Europe to Africa.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 6, 7:12 AM

The economies of scale that globalization depends on, relies on logistics and transportation networks that can handle this high-volume.  In a word, the container, as mundane as it may seem, facilitated the era within which we live today.

Rescooped by Ami Zach from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Economic and Political Impact of Immigrants, Latinos and Asians State by State

The Economic and Political Impact of Immigrants, Latinos and Asians State by State | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

Not every state is equally impacted by migration, and the demographic profile of migrants is different for every state. This is an online mapping tool to search a large database that can give the user state specific information about the impact of economics and politics based on migration from Latin America and Asia on any given state.


Tags: Immigration, unit 2 population, migration, economic, statistics, mapping, political.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ami Zach from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

After Alabama Immigration Law, Few Americans Taking Immigrants' Work

After Alabama Immigration Law, Few Americans Taking Immigrants' Work | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
ONEONTA, Ala. -- Potato farmer Keith Smith saw most of his immigrant workers leave after Alabama's tough immigration law took effect, so he hired Americans.

 

Geography is all about the interconnected of themes and places.  This issue in Alabama is displaying these interconnections quite vividly.  Economics, immigration, culture, politics and agriculture are intensely intertwined in this issue.   


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 29, 6:57 AM

This is another article that highlights the skill deficit in this country.  People seem to be afraid of doing hard work and would rather do nothing then work hard to learn this skill.  If it were a choice between no job and this type of job people would take the jobs but the third choice of unemployment payments makes people who might do these jobs decide not to.  As long as they are paid more to not work then work, they will not do the jobs that need workers.  The farmer made a good point that a skilled picker can make $200-$300 a day but an unskilled worker doing the job makes only $24 a day.  The work ethic of this country needs to be changed, young people today do not want to work hard or put in the effort.  When farmers can no longer get workers how long will it be before there is a food problem as well as a worker problem in this country.  It is possible to make a good living doing these types of jobs but not as long as people feel the work is beneath them or they are unwilling to do the hard manual labor required to do the job well.