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World’s Muslim population more widespread than you might think

World’s Muslim population more widespread than you might think | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
There are about 1.6 billion Muslims, or 23% of the world's population, making Islam the second-largest religion.

Via Seth Dixon
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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 1:57 PM

Before seeing the number of Muslims represented within the countries they are mainly in, I believed that the majority of the world's Muslim population was in the Middle East and Northern Africa. I never thought of it being such a spreadout Religion, but because the portion of the Muslim population that is usually discussed in the media is from the Middle East, it is not hard to see why many believe that is where they are from.

Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 3:55 PM

Showing the distribution of Islam around the world. 

Lena Minassian's curator insight, March 22, 4:46 PM

This article was good to look at because the majority of people assume Muslims are only in the Middle East. There are 1.6 billion Muslims around the world. Two-thirds of the Muslim population live in the Asia-Pacific region than in the middle east. More Muslims actually live in India and Pakistan. Muslims make up the majority of the population in 49 countries around the world. Islam has become the world's second largest religious tradition after Christianity. I would love to know some reasons behind why certain Muslims live in other areas. 

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Israel and Palestine

Seth Dixon has provided a great intro to this video...

 

Watch this Jewish Voice for Peace (http://jewishvoiceforpeace.org/) 6 minute mini-primer about why Israelis and Palestinians are fighting..

This video from the Jewish Voice for Peace has a more politically motivated angle than most of the resources that I post on this site, but I feel that they do justice to both sides as well as the truth. In a simple way it lays out the roots of many of the problems in the region with historic and geographic perspectives.

Tags: Israel, Palestine, conflict, political, borders.


Via Seth Dixon, Ms. Carter, Mr. David Burton, Dennis V Thomas
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Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 27, 2014 9:40 PM

This was a very understated and poignant  video. The simplicity and directness was very powerful. It was very interesting to see this conflict, that had taken place in this area presented in such a way. Around the time of WWII about 7% of this area  was occupied by Jewish people, currently they occupy almost 100%.  I commend the Jewish Voice for showing this conflict in a different light. Showing that both sides may have been in the wrong .

James Hobson's curator insight, October 28, 2014 9:58 AM

(Africa topic 1)

{{Note: Some topics and locations pertain to multiple geographic regions (i.e. northern Africa, the Middle East, and southwestern Asia, and topics in different regions may refer to the same country or location because of this.}}

I found it interesting to watch a video that comes from an implied anti-Israel standpoint, especially since the organization which made this video is called the Jewish Voice for Peace. Though there has always been disagreement as to who should occupy some of the most hallowed land in the world, it seems that the Israeli-Palestinian conflict stems more out of the UN repartitioning plan. Regardless of clashing religions and cultures, it does seem unfair that a minority of people control the majority of land and resources. This makes me wonder why exactly the UN made the Israeli state there: was is purely because of the Jewish religion associations?, or because no other country wanted to absorb the increasing number of refugees?, or because the UN wanted to gain a stronghold in the Middle East?, or perhaps a combination of all of the above?

Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 19, 8:40 PM

From 1946 to 2000, Palestine (Islamic individuals) have been at war with Israel (Jewish individuals) over land in Israel/Palestine. In 1946, Palestine took over most of Israel but throughout the decades up until 2000, Israel slowly won over almost every piece of Israel and now, Palestine barely has any land in Israel. From 1949 to 1967, Palestine took over a specific area of Israel known as the West Bank and another small part of Israel known as Gaza. There was a lot of war going on between Israel and Palestine because Israel discriminated against non-Jews. Palestinians became refugees but that didn't stop Israel from fighting to take over Palestinian land.

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Persian or Iranian? Is there a Difference?

Persian or Iranian?  Is there a Difference? | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

Over the next few months, Ajam Media Collective will host a series that focuses on and describes various elements of the cultural, ethnic and linguistic mosaic that we refer to collectively as Iran...

 

What is in a name?  We know that there are subtle differences between Hispanic, Indigenous, Latino and Mexican that are bound with the history of these words and how they have been used by both insiders and outsiders to construct identity.  Likewise, the distinctions between the terms Persian and Iranian are often used interchangeably.  However there are political, ethnic, linguistic and religious connotations that shape the meanings behind these terms.  While I don't necessarily agree with all of the arguments, this is an interesting look at the historical roots of these distinctions and the ramifications of these terms.   


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
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Cam E's curator insight, March 4, 2014 11:23 AM

This has always been a question between my friends and I, as one of my friends identifies as Persian. In my limited experience in the US it seems that the people who identify themselves as Iranian have immigrated in the last two generations or so. In comparison to families which came over quite a few generations ago who refer to themselves as "Persian"

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 29, 2014 3:58 PM

When speaking about this topic it is important to recognize that Iranian and Persian are not the same. I believe in this classification as well as others placing people into groups of any kind can be dangerous. I enjoyed the comedy routine included in this article by Persian-Iranian-American comic Maz Jobrani. I thought it was very clever how he poked fun at the fact that he prefers to be called Persian at times because in this post 9-11 world it seems "softer". I thought it was hilarious how he mentioned cats and rugs and tried to emphasize the "softer" side of Persia.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 17, 5:00 PM

This is an interesting phenomenon.  I believe we even have a little bit of the "that's not American"-swagger here in the U.S., but thankfully diversity is still celebrated more in our country than anywhere else.  This article points out many of the reasons why there has been and always probably will be much tension within the Middle East.  Like in Iran, most Arabic countries have several different tribes and ethnic groups residing within its borders.  The problem occurs when the countries try to make one culture, one language, or one ethnicity dominant over the others.  

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The Conflict Zone

The Conflict Zone | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

"In a new series of four eight-minute videos, National Geographic Emerging Explorer Aziz Abu Sarah is a cultural educator working to build relationships between Israelis and Palestinians in Jerusalem and throughout Israel. In this series of four eight-minute videos, Abu Sarah meets with people from both sides of the conflict in order to better understand and communicate how this international dispute impacts their everyday lives."


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The Conflict in Syria

The Conflict in Syria | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

Brown University's Choices Program has many excellent resources for social studies teachers including "Teaching with the News."  Many teachers are seeing the importance of Syria, but might lack the regional expertise to put it in context or to the time to link it with the curriculum.  If that is the case (and even if it is not), this is the perfect place to find lesson plans on the ongoing Syrian conflict. 

 

Tags: political, MiddleEast, conflict, war.


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
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