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Where Do Borders Need to Be Redrawn? - Room for Debate

Where Do Borders Need to Be Redrawn? - Room for Debate | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
“ What parts of the world should rethink their maps? Why and how?”
Via Seth Dixon, Nancy Watson
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 7, 11:28 AM

Maps are always changing as a new nation gets added and old lines cease to make sense. Territory is claimed and reclaimed.  This series of seven articles in the New York Times explores regional examples of how borders impacts places from a variety of scholarly perspectives.  Together, these article challenge student to reconsider the world map and to conceptualize conflicts within a spatial context.

 

Tags: bordersmapping, political, territoriality, sovereignty.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, July 16, 10:53 AM

WOW, some really interesting thoughtdebate points here! very very unit 4

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 7:05 PM

APHG-U4

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Can’t stand the heat? Come to world’s first climate-controlled city

Can’t stand the heat? Come to world’s first climate-controlled city | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
“ Dubai has already earned a reputation for pushing the boundaries with its architecture, having built the world’s tallest building, a hotel shaped like a sail and a palm tree‑shaped archipelago of luxury properties.”
Via Suvi Salo, Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks
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Where Do Borders Need to Be Redrawn? - Room for Debate

Where Do Borders Need to Be Redrawn? - Room for Debate | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
What parts of the world should rethink their maps? Why and how?

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 7, 11:28 AM

Maps are always changing as a new nation gets added and old lines cease to make sense. Territory is claimed and reclaimed.  This series of seven articles in the New York Times explores regional examples of how borders impacts places from a variety of scholarly perspectives.  Together, these article challenge student to reconsider the world map and to conceptualize conflicts within a spatial context.

 

Tags: bordersmapping, political, territoriality, sovereignty.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, July 16, 10:53 AM

WOW, some really interesting thoughtdebate points here! very very unit 4

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 7:05 PM

APHG-U4

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15 Famous Landmarks Zoomed Out Tell a Bigger Story

15 Famous Landmarks Zoomed Out Tell a Bigger Story | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Context is everything.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, April 24, 8:26 PM

Sometimes it is what you can't see that is important

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Geography of Gangnam Style

Geography of Gangnam Style | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

Geography of Gangnam Style...Nice shout out to Seth Dixon


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The Deadliest Animal in the World

The Deadliest Animal in the World | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Bill Gates introduces Mosquito Week on his personal blog, the Gates Notes. Everything posted this week is dedicated to this deadly creature. Mosquitoes carry devastating diseases like malaria, dengue fever, yellow fever, and encephalitis.

Via Seth Dixon
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Jacques Lebègue's curator insight, May 2, 3:13 AM

"C'est pas la p'tite bête qui manger la grosse". La manger, je ne sais pas, être le vecteur de son décès, c'est plus probable. Les moustiques et le paludisme tuent plus de personnes en 4min que les requins en un an!
On pourrait aussi drastiquement réduire le nombre de décès humains en désormais tous ces humains dotés d'une arme...

16s3d's curator insight, May 2, 3:51 AM

"C'est pas la p'tite bête qui manger la grosse". La manger, je ne sais pas, être le vecteur de son décès, c'est plus probable. Les moustiques et le paludisme tuent plus de personnes en 4min que les requins en un an!
On pourrait aussi drastiquement réduire le nombre de décès humains en désormais tous ces humains dotés d'une arme...

Fathie Kundie's curator insight, May 5, 11:08 AM

ما هو المخلوق الأشد فتكا في العالم؟

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Economic Decline and Sense of Place

"McDowell County, situated in the coalfields of West Virginia, has experienced a great boom-and-bust since 1950. But despite the economic decline and population loss, many still call it home and feel a great sense of purpose among the mountains. Residents speak about their connection to this place and the meaning of 'home.' Hear more stories at hollowdocumentary.com "


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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 24, 11:27 AM

units 1 & 7

dilaycock's curator insight, April 29, 6:51 PM

Excellent example of urban decline. Would pair nicely with a reading from 'Rocket Boys' by Homer Hickam Jnr, or with the movie version 'October Sky.' The book and movie are the true story of a boy in Coalwood, West Virginia in the 1950s who is determined to  "escape" working in the coal mines to become a rocket scientist.

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, September 16, 11:02 PM

 McDowell, a once thriving county in the 1950’s ceased to keep up with the ever-chaning world. There was little need for coal after the 1980’s so work became scarce and the “Brain Drain” began. Those looking for a successful future left for there was more choice elsewhere and economically it would make no sense to stay in McDowell. Nevertheless, cultural upbringings paved way to this "Boom and Bust” town, which gave people a sense of place and identity. Though McDowell is economically on the decline the communal relations and sense of place the community holds is still strong. 

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Why Geography?

Why Geography? | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

"Geography. It lets you study the world. No, really, THE WORLD. Think about that. What other subject deals with rocks? Moving continents? AND climate? Diffusion of plants and animals? Water quality? Now, what if you add some human systems--do the other sciences let you relate the earth to economic or political systems? And culture--food, religion, music, housing, or language? How about urban systems and settlement forms? Past, present, and future, anywhere in the world? And how many subject areas let you look at something from a scientific, social-scientific, humanistic, AND artistic perspective? Yeah, I said artistic--I like to illustrate my findings with a nice map.

Tell me all about global studies or environmental science if you'd like--they're alright too. But NOTHING lets you see the world like geography does."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 11:17 AM

This 'sermon' from the Church of Geography is outstanding (the 'Church' is a geo-evangelizing group on Facebook and Twitter that is the home to the delightful memes pictured above).  Many organizations are trying to re-brand geography to gain greater public support at the same time that other interdisciplinary initiatives with geographic content are gaining traction: global studies, environmental sustainability, centers for spatial analysis, etc.  We don't need a name change as much as we need people to capture the vision of geography's centrality and holistic capacity. 


Tags: geo-inspiration, geography education.

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10 All-American Foods That Foreigners Can't Stand

10 All-American Foods That Foreigners Can't Stand | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Red velvet cake does not sit well with many foreigners. They dislike it because it is packed with chemicals and food coloring. Many think that is tastes bland and that the only flavor coming through is the artificial coloring taste. They would much prefer a true chocolate or vanilla cake.

Via Seth Dixon
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Joy Kinley's curator insight, April 3, 10:19 AM

Culture determines what food that you eat.  American foods are a blend of different cultures as well as convenience products.  The convenience foods are full of different chemicals and perservatives that alter the flavor of foods. 

Even for foods that we think would taste the same like chocolate there is a large difference in taste.  I agree that some of the things like grits or biscuits and gravy would seem odd if you hadn't grown up with them.  Red Velvet Cake (the only part I like about it is the Cream Cheese Icing) has a chemcial taste as does the cheese products, such as cheese in a can.

However just as foreigners don't like some American foods some foreign foods taste equally strange to Americans, even things that seem that they would taste the same such as soft drinks in other countries. 

However Peanut Butter and Jelly is wonderful (it is difficult to find peanut butter in many countries) but I agree that European chocolate is much tastier.

Mr. David Burton's comment, April 5, 7:55 PM
But I oh so love everything on this list ... pfff :-)
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 28, 10:45 AM

unit 3 & Unit 5

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Donald Sterling’s Impolite Racism

Donald Sterling’s Impolite Racism | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
The embattled basketball team owner broke the rules of how one should go about being racist in America.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 28, 7:06 PM

The Donald Sterling fiasco has the country talking about race and the how racism plays a role in society and its institutions.  This article has some great fodder for discussion on the topic.  Most especially though, the second half of the linked video, where this question is posed, “Why do racist words bring more accountability than racist practices?”  Given the Cliven Bundy and Donald Sterling stories, it's fair to say that Americans are no longer willing to put up with their racist friends.  

Renata Hill's comment, April 29, 4:22 PM
I so disagree with the delicate use of "impolite" in this head and the way that so many people are tiptoeing around the issue! Sterling's (and Bundy's) type of generational-based racism is so repugnant, so virulent and awful that the only way non-white people (and, frankly, the rest of the US) will be able to live in a decent, compassionate society is for such old, white men to die off. The mainlining of such powerfully prejudiced ancestoral "juice," needs to be cut off, like a gangrenous limb.
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Are You Worldly Enough To Ace This Geography Quiz? - Huffington Post

Are You Worldly Enough To Ace This Geography Quiz? - Huffington Post | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Are You Worldly Enough To Ace This Geography Quiz?
Huffington Post
Sure, you can point your own country and a few others out on a map, but just how far can you go? How well do you actually know the world you live in?
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How to Green Screen on the iPad - YouTube

A quick tutorial of how to do green screen or chroma key work on the iPad using the Green Screen app by DoInk.

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Bye-Bye, Baby

Bye-Bye, Baby | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Birthrates are falling around the world. And that’s O.K.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, April 5, 11:23 PM

Baby boom,  baby bust. What the future holds. 

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50 Cities You Should See In Your Lifetime

50 Cities You Should See In Your Lifetime | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
“With our ever-expanding bucket lists, it's sometimes easy to lose sight of the essentials. Well, we've gone to the community of travelers at minube.net with a simple goal: find the greatest destinations on Earth. From the great ancient capitals to t...”
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 8, 1:37 PM

Because nothing beats seeing the world.  I've been to 9 of these cities and am eager to see many more.  How many have you been to?  What cities would you add to this list? 

MReese Geo's curator insight, July 10, 10:17 AM

Only been to one city on this list and it was Las Vegas but would LOVE to vist pretty much all of these cities.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 7:04 PM

APG-MAPS

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Ramadan in Sweden with no dusk, no dawn

Ramadan in Sweden with no dusk, no dawn | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
“During summer, the sun never sets in Sweden's northernmost town, posing challenges for Muslims observing the holy month.”
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 8, 12:29 PM

Like many early religious traditions, Ramadan is observed based on measurements from the moon and sun. The start of Ramadan is determined by the sighting of the new moon, which  moves about 11 days back in the Gregorian calendar each year. During Ramadan the consumption of food and water is prohibited between dawn and dusk, how do Muslims observing the fast manage in the far north of Scandinavia, where the sun never sets?  When Ramadan falls in December, however, Muslims will face the opposite of midnight sun: polar night. For two weeks, the sun does not rise above the horizon.

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France to redraw nation's map to save money

France to redraw nation's map to save money | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

"France's administrative regions — Normandy, Alsace, Burgundy, etc. — have long been part of the identity of citizens of this diverse country. Now, merging some of them is seen as a logical way to save money on bureaucracy, and the French support it — as long as it's someone else's turf."


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Jordan Schemmel's curator insight, May 21, 1:04 PM

How countries identify smaller administrative regions is crucial to understanding both how they are governed, and how these regions impact cultural differences.

Kampe Kyle's curator insight, May 28, 10:18 PM

In AP Human Geo., this article relates to the theme of redistricting and political reapportionment because it involves the redrawing of geographic boundaries within a country in order to facilitate a certain political and economic outcome.

Joy Kinley's curator insight, June 16, 3:28 PM

It is amazing that people are all for redrawing and redistricting until it impacts them.  This is a touchy subject in the United States with some small towns and communities merging even though they only have decades of identity not centuries.  If these merges happen in France I see that there will be many strikes and protests and when it is over everyone still would maintain what they would call their "real identity" not what France gave them.  

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Kindergarten show canceled so kids can keep studying to become ‘college and career ready.’ Really.

Kindergarten show canceled so kids can keep studying to become ‘college and career ready.’ Really. | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

"An annual year-end kindergarten show has been canceled at a New York school because the kids have to keep working so they will be “college and career” ready. Really.

That’s what it says in a letter (see below) sent to parents by Ellen Best-Laimit, the interim principal of Harley Avenue Primary School in Elwood, N.Y., and four kindergarten teachers. The play was to be staged over two days, May 14 and 15, according to the school’s calendar."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 28, 3:21 PM

I'm all for education and promote our children to be college ready.  I promise you that the only things that I remember from Kindergarten (that matter) are good feelings about learning and a sense of accomplishment.  My handwriting was woefully sloppy, but I'm glad that didn't mean I could go out to play in playground and slap some paint on a butcher paper.  The painting didn't help me get 'college ready' since I've no artistic training, but it was fun.  Early education need to not lose sight of it's primary goal; have fun and let the kids learn how to learn.  What they learn can be saved for another day.  Teach kids to dread school when they are 5 and you've created jaded 6-year-olds. 

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News Literacy: Critical-Thinking Skills for the 21st Century

News Literacy: Critical-Thinking Skills for the 21st Century | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

"Every teacher I've worked with over the last five years recalls two kinds of digital experiences with students.The first I think of as digital native moments, when a student uses a piece of technology with almost eerie intuitiveness. The second I call digital naiveté moments, when a student trusts a source of information that is obviously unreliable. How can these coexist? How can students be so technologically savvy while also displaying their lack of basic skills for navigating the digital world?"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 28, 4:00 PM

This is a nice article with some practical advice but it also can that helps us conceptualize the thinking skills that our students are going to need in the future (with a classic photo that embodies 20th century news literacy).  Previously, I've written on this same topic, with some strategies to how to help students assess the validity of online information with geographic content (with a series of maps and images).  I know I've been duped before, and it's okay to admit that to your students; but we need to teach students how to be critical readers as they are swimming in an ocean of digital information of variable quality.  This is why I see content curation as an important part of modern education; it is a way to teach student the tools to assess the quality of information for themselves.  They will be gathering, organizing and synthesizing digital information for rest of their lives.        

Linda Dougherty's curator insight, August 12, 12:41 AM
3 ideas to incorporate News Literacy into the classroom while guiding students into evaluating news articles and media.
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Globalization and the Textile Industry

"On the 100th anniversary of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire, little has changed in the global sweatshop economy. Workers are again trapped and burned to death behind locked exit gates."


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Kelly Collinsworth's curator insight, April 16, 8:42 AM

For Beth Manor

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 24, 11:28 AM

unit 6

Danielle Bellefeuille's curator insight, May 10, 6:16 PM

The sad reality of the new division of labor, we are moving backwards instead of forwards with labor policies and widening the gap between core and periphery countries. We need to stand up and advocate for fair trade. These countries rely on us for sources of unemployment, and we need to give them better wages, safer working conditions, and help them push pass this dependency, and grow into more economically and socially strong countries.

 

http://www.laborrights.org

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How the Potato Changed the World

How the Potato Changed the World | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Brought to Europe from the New World by Spanish explorers, the lowly potato gave rise to modern industrial agriculture

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Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 1:38 PM

Potatoes were very important in the Colombian Exchange, which was the exchange of plants and animals to and from different lands where they are not native to.  Today, the potato is the fifth most important crop in the world.  Food is deeply routed in culture and this massive exchange changed societies.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 11:41 PM

Potatoes were brought to the New World through the Columbian Exchange. It does have a negative connotation but the trade route was used to diffuse cultures by trading food. 

Gina Panighetti's curator insight, August 4, 5:35 PM

Columbian Exchange Unit

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Japan banned from Antarctic whaling

Japan banned from Antarctic whaling | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
The UN's International Court of Justice rules that Japan must temporarily halt its whaling programme in the Antarctic.

 

It agreed with Australia, which brought the case in May 2010, that the  programme was not for scientific research as claimed by Tokyo. Japan said it would abide by the decision but added it "regrets and is deeply  disappointed by the decision". Australia argued that the programme was commercial whaling in disguise. The court's decision is considered legally binding. Japan had argued that the suit brought by Australia was an attempt to impose its cultural norms on Japan.


Via Seth Dixon
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The white tourist’s burden

The white tourist’s burden | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

"Growing Western demand for altruistic vacations is feeding the white-savior industrial complex.  Volunteerism presents an escape, a rare encounter with an authenticity sorely missed, hardship palpably and physically felt – for a small price."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 6:02 PM

As stated in this article, "Under this program, well-to-do tourists sign up to build schools, clean and restore riverbanks, ring birds and act as caregivers to AIDS orphans for a few weeks. This led to the creation of a profitable industry catering to volunteer tourists. The orphans’ conditions are effectively transformed into a boutique package in which 'saving' them yields profits from tourists. The foreigners’ ability to pay for the privilege of volunteering crowds out local workers."  For a satirical look at this type of tourism, the Onion absolutely delivers.  

Albert Jordan's curator insight, April 29, 2:22 PM

Why not take advantage of "I feel guilty because Im doing exponentially better than them?" or the less politically correct term - "white guilt." Arguably this can be seen as the "those that have" feeling guilty and thinking that by volunteering for a few weeks will make them feel better about their rampant consumerism. As the article points out though, this is not a problem solver. You can build homes for people but without giving them a foundation(and education) in how to take "proper" care of themselves, as well as the proper infrastructure to support them, they will continue to beg, or be unable to find work(if there is any) that will give them the security they need to support the house given to them, or take care of any well water that has been established, etc, etc. Unfortunately, many of the volunteers who pay to volunteer do not want to fix the bigger picture but instead want to get a small taste of it so that they can talk about it over cocktails or use their Kodak moment for a new Facebook default.

Tracey M Benson's curator insight, May 5, 5:59 PM
I have heard from people working long term with schools and orphanages the short term volunteer culture causes more harm than good.Seth Dixon sums this article up:

As stated in this article, "Under this program, well-to-do tourists sign up to build schools, clean and restore riverbanks, ring birds and act as caregivers to AIDS orphans for a few weeks. This led to the creation of a profitable industry catering to volunteer tourists. The orphans’ conditions are effectively transformed into a boutique package in which 'saving' them yields profits from tourists. The foreigners’ ability to pay for the privilege of volunteering crowds out local workers."  For a satirical look at this type of tourism, the Onion absolutely delivers.  

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10 inventions that owe their success to World War One

10 inventions that owe their success to World War One | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 24, 12:34 AM

War can disrupt supply chains and also create new modes of production, promote emerging fashions and spur new innovations.  World War I was no blessing, but these inventions are the silver lining. 

Matt Richardson's curator insight, May 2, 7:12 AM

This is an interesting article. (Scooped from Dr. Dixon's page.)

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China on course to become 'world's most Christian nation' within 15 years

China on course to become 'world's most Christian nation' within 15 years | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
The number of Christians in Communist China is growing so steadily that it by 2030 it could have more churchgoers than America

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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, April 28, 3:48 PM

Religion...

Albert Jordan's curator insight, April 29, 2:27 PM

Another example of how one thing can begin in one region, go to another, then another, and then find a new identity as its previous one fades away. As part of what can be said to be a "devlopment" cycle, as a nation goes past manufacturing and into the services sector as well as its populace becoming more secular, the leaders of the church still need to bring in wealth for their coffers. What the missionarys started under colonialism is perhaps starting to pay off. Culture travels just as traded commodities does, by having peoples from different places inter-mingle and the largest motivator of that is global trade bringing people that ordinarily would not have met, together. Or in some cases, bible toting missionaries attempting to "civilize" a "primitive" people. If Jesus doesnt work, there is always opium.. again.

Linda Rutledge Hudson's curator insight, May 13, 4:07 PM

It's interesting to think there are those who believe crime will diminish because there are more Christians.  I guess that's an infusion of Confucian morality and hope into their Christian ideals.  I hope that this will pave a way for the growth of human rights and more political freedom for China.

 

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Feeding 9 Billion - National Geographic

Feeding 9 Billion - National Geographic | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
When we think about threats to the environment, we tend to picture cars and smokestacks, not dinner. But the truth is, our need for food poses one of the biggest dangers to the planet.

Via Allison Anthony
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