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The world’s happiest and least happy countries, mapped

The world’s happiest and least happy countries, mapped | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Can you measure happiness? A UN-sponsored Columbia University report set out to try.

Via Mathijs Booden
Tracy Klug's insight:

What cultural values are implied by the happiest countries in the world?

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Mathijs Booden's curator insight, September 11, 2013 11:48 AM

Map based on data in the World Happines Report 2013 (http://unsdsn.org/happiness/).

 

Seems largely comparable to GDP/capita.

Makenna Jordan's curator insight, September 13, 2013 1:31 AM

I've never seen a map like this but it's crazy that someone would think to make a map based on how happy others is. And if you really read into the article and take sometime to look at the map, It dosent seem to be so incorrect. I found this map incredibly interesting because I've never seen anything like it before. 

Mathijs Booden's comment, September 19, 2013 10:02 AM
@Makenna I don't think the map is incorrect, just that it correlates pretty well with a map of GDP/capita, an index of how wealthy people are on average. Having said that, there are a lot of anomalies. For example, Mexicans are apparently happier than most Europeans despite earning considerably less and having their country torn by organized crime, and Botswana is deeply unhappy despite having prospered, relatively speaking, in economic terms (HIV?).
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Rescooped by Tracy Klug from Cultural Geography @ JTCC
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Map: Every Country in the World Involved in a Territorial Dispute

Map: Every Country in the World Involved in a Territorial Dispute | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Hint: Unless you live in Mongolia, your country's probably on this list.

Via Allison Anthony
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Allison Anthony's curator insight, March 21, 3:17 AM

Check out this map and article that indicates that most countries are having some type of border dispute with a neighbor.

Allison Anthony's curator insight, March 21, 3:21 AM

Check out this map and article that shows how most of the world's countries have an issue with a neighbor over its boundaries. S/O to Mongolia and some other landlocked countries...I guess nobody wants you...

Rescooped by Tracy Klug from AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
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Travelers' choice: World's top 25 destinations

Travelers' choice: World's top 25 destinations | Human Geography | Scoop.it
You blinked and a quarter of the year flew by. It's time to plan a vacation. TripAdvisor's list of top destinations should help.

Via Allison Anthony
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Allison Anthony's curator insight, April 8, 7:54 AM

You might be surprised at #1!

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Logging and Mudslides

Logging and Mudslides | Human Geography | Scoop.it
In recent decades the state allowed logging — with restrictions — on the plateau above the Snohomish County hillside that collapsed in last weekend’s deadly mudslide.

Via Seth Dixon
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bye bye's comment, May 8, 5:38 PM
i agree with hi hi
hi hi's comment, May 8, 5:38 PM
who is the nob that cares about logging and mud slides
bye bye's comment, May 8, 5:40 PM
u need help guys
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Global State of Agriculture

Global State of Agriculture | Human Geography | Scoop.it

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Mercor's curator insight, March 21, 2013 3:18 AM

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 1, 7:30 AM

Unit V, main idea of the unit!

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 15, 7:00 AM

Unit 5

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Tracing the Language Family Tree

The different languages and dialects of the world are generally associated with specific countries, regions, or even towns. Before there were billions of people on Earth, smaller groups and communities developed and spoke their own individual languages, and when those groups and communities stayed in the same place for hundreds or thousands of years, those languages became associated with the land they lived in. However, not everyone stayed in the same place all the time, and social change from war, commerce, travel, and environmental change pushed or pulled people into different regions, where they’d both influence and be influenced by the new languages spoken there. That’s why English is full of words from other languages, and why it’s often helpful to learn a second language to improve your vocabulary in the first one. - See more at: http://www.ultimatevocabulary.com/2014/01/tracing-the-language-family-tree/#sthash.mJ66M8qA.dpuf


Via Mylene Jose
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Indo-European Language Family Tree

Indo-European Language Family Tree | Human Geography | Scoop.it
This page contains several versions of the Indo-European language family tree in graphic format, copyright by Dan Short.

Via Dennis V Thomas
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Rescooped by Tracy Klug from AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
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Russia sanctions: Why the U.S. and Europe are not quite in step

Russia sanctions: Why the U.S. and Europe are not quite in step | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The United States and Europe have reacted against Russia's military intervention in the Crimean peninsula last week with threats of economic punishments. But their positions are slightly different. Here's why.

Via Allison Anthony
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Coca-Cola's Multilingual Super Bowl Ad Inspired A Racist Meltdown Online

Coca-Cola's Multilingual Super Bowl Ad Inspired A Racist Meltdown Online | Human Geography | Scoop.it

Some of these might be jokes, but it's so hard to tell anymore. Most of the people upset about the advertisement didn't even seem to notice the gay couple in it. Seriously!?!

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Rescooped by Tracy Klug from Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page
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See These Rare Photos Of Remote Tribes Before They Disappear

See These Rare Photos Of Remote Tribes Before They Disappear | Human Geography | Scoop.it
This photographer has celebrated their cultures in the most stunning way.

Via Jessica Robson Postlethwaite
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Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, January 19, 6:24 AM

Un fotógrafo capta  la diversidad humana en recónditos lugares del planeta

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40 more maps that explain the world

40 more maps that explain the world | Human Geography | Scoop.it
I've searched wide and far for maps that can reveal and surprise and inform in ways that the daily headlines might not.

Via Seth Dixon
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Christophe CESETTI's curator insight, January 23, 2:37 PM

Pearltree "Géographie" http://pear.ly/cqIbP

Terheck's curator insight, January 26, 2:58 AM

Une sélection de 40 cartes qui permettent de mieux comprendre notre monde.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 11:30 AM

When looking at this map there area few things that stick out to me and not just the colors. Fistly what I founf interesting was that South America in relation to where we live is quite different. For example, The US economic status is High Class at $12195 or more for most of the East and West Coast and then it is dull in the middle. These facts compared to South America where they are mostly upper middle class at around $3946-12185 and a portion of them are the lower middle class which rings in at around $886-3945.

Rescooped by Tracy Klug from AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
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Map: All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella

Map: All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Turkish hazelnuts, Malaysian palm oil, Nigerian cocoa, Brazilian sugar, French vanilla...

Via Allison Anthony
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Allison Anthony's curator insight, December 14, 2013 1:40 PM

Globalization and the supply chain of one of your favorite goodies!

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Six Ways the U.S. is Changing | TIME.com

Six Ways the U.S. is Changing | TIME.com | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The oil boom has legs, the recession is lingering and Maine is getting old". This is a great look at areas in the US that have gained or lost population in 2013 and the reasons behind shifts in fertility and migration.


Via Allison Anthony
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Why Many Cities Are Located In The Wrong Place

Why Many Cities Are Located In The Wrong Place | Human Geography | Scoop.it
A historical problem.

 

The world is urbanising rapidly (World Urbanization Prospects, the 2011 Revision). Some of its rapidly growing cities, however, seem to be misplaced. They are located in places hampered by poor access to world markets, shortages of water, or vulnerability to flooding, earthquakes, and volcanoes.

This outcome – cities being stuck in the wrong places – has dire economic and social consequences. When thinking about policy responses, a key research question is whether historical events can leave towns trapped in suboptimal places.

New research on a historical ‘experiment’

Our recent research looks at this issue by comparing the evolution of two initially similar urban networks following a historical calamity that wiped out one, while leaving the other largely intact (Michaels and Rauch 2013). The specific setting in which we examine this is northwestern Europe, where we trace out the effects of the collapse of the Western Roman Empire more than 1500 years ago, through to the present day.


Via Seth Dixon
Tracy Klug's insight:

This combined with climate change, where will our biggest city centers be relocated to?

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The map that caused a century of trouble

The map that caused a century of trouble | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"A map marked with crude chinagraph-pencil in the second decade of the 20th Century shows the ambition - and folly - of the 100-year old British-French plan that helped create the modern-day Middle East."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 8, 9:51 AM

Many of the geopolitical issues that confront the Middle East stem from the secret Sykes-Picot Treaty that divvied up the Ottoman Empire

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Dubai's Growth

Dubai's Growth | Human Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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steve smith's curator insight, March 31, 1:03 AM

Great for tourism development

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 7:48 AM

This series of pictures shows the extremely rapid growth of Dubai. An extremely wealthy city, the oil richness of Dubai has allowed for it to grow at an unprecedented rate from a desert to a sprawling metropolis. Such an impressive city springing up in a desolate desert speaks to how much resources can dictate where and how city growth occurs.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 14, 2:13 PM

 Dubai has drastically changed throughtout it's time before the globalization boom and was one of the only cities to be impacted positively by globalization. As you can see from the depiction that Dubai in 1991 was a deserted place and then in 2005 it transformed into becoming somewhat of a city. In 2012 this city drastically transformed in order to help the globalization process and the whole city in general was trasformed into a mega city.

Rescooped by Tracy Klug from AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
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6 of the World's Most Worrisome Disputed Territories

6 of the World's Most Worrisome Disputed Territories | Human Geography | Scoop.it

Territorial disputes are nothing new, but political analysts warn of a rise in tensions because of Russia's bold move into Crimea.


Via Allison Anthony
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Language family

Language family | Human Geography | Scoop.it

A language family is a group of languages related through descent from a common ancestor, called the proto-language of that family. The term 'family' comes from the tree model of language origination in historical linguistics, which makes use of a metaphor comparing languages to people in a biological family tree, or in a subsequent modification, to species in a phylogenetic tree of evolutionary taxonomy. No actual biological relationship between speakers is implied by the metaphor.


Via Fico Ventilatory, Mariana Soffer
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indoeuropean-language-family-tree.jpg (750x934 pixels)

indoeuropean-language-family-tree.jpg (750x934 pixels) | Human Geography | Scoop.it

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Rescooped by Tracy Klug from AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
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See More, Eat More: The Geography Of Fast Food

See More, Eat More: The Geography Of Fast Food | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The more fast food you encounter where you live and work, the likelier you are to be obese, research shows. That suggests policies limiting fast-food outlets in neighborhoods may be onto something.

Via Allison Anthony
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GMO-Free Europe

GMO-Free Europe | Human Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, February 5, 11:47 AM

Parts of Europe know to be GMO free. When will we?

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, February 27, 8:25 AM

The GMO debate is raging throughout the world. Many believe that these crops have many harmful effects on the human body due their their altered genetic state. Thankfully, many countries are adopting a non-GMO attitude, as illustrated in the above map, so as to prevent the many poor side-effects they have.

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 3:44 PM

This map is the epitome of agricultural geography and the beginning of a series of questions such as why did all of Europe choose to be GMO-free? Or, does the proximity of European countries have to do with the fact that they share similar values (such as being GMO-free)? What does the EU have to do with this pattern? Because the EU chooses to be GMO-free, European countries are making a statement and consequently refining agricultural markets by refusing to import certain genetically modified foods. Agricultural geography thus shares some patterns across space- with all of Europe sharing simile agricultural policies. 

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Gravity...

Gravity... | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The video clip shows the cliff where the fall initiated, near the ledge close to the skyline.  Then, below the ledge, you can see the talus cone, which are rocky bits along the slope. The really large boulders that fell down and ruined the house have carved out soil ruts as the boulders rolled downhill." http://geographyeducation.org/2014/01/30/gravity/


Via Seth Dixon
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YEC Geo's curator insight, January 31, 10:42 AM

Gravity-induced erosion in action.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, February 3, 11:04 AM

Gravity

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, February 5, 12:13 PM

There are some things that just cannot be avoided like this rock that gouged its way down a hill, destroying part of a home and the landscape. Will we ever be in time to predict their coming and avoid such disasters from happening?

Rescooped by Tracy Klug from AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
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Where In The World Is The Best Place For Healthy Eating?

Where In The World Is The Best Place For Healthy Eating? | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The U.S. didn't even make the top 20, even though it has the greatest abundance of cheap food.". But cheap doesn't equal good!! Check out the list!


Via Allison Anthony
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Valentina González Tapiero's curator insight, January 15, 7:04 PM

estos son los alimentos que nutren nuestro planeta.

Rescooped by Tracy Klug from AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
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A Midwestern Meatpacking Town Welcomes Immigrants

A Midwestern Meatpacking Town Welcomes Immigrants | Human Geography | Scoop.it
In the 1980s, leaders in Garden City, Kan., decided to treat the immigrant influx as a blessing.

Via Allison Anthony
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Allison Anthony's curator insight, December 12, 2013 8:28 AM

Long a pull factor for immigrants, the meatpacking industry still draws people in to America, even to small towns.

Rescooped by Tracy Klug from AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
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Depressing News About Population Growth

Depressing News About Population Growth | Human Geography | Scoop.it

America's population is growing at its slowest rate in decades, and the sluggish economy is mostly to blame, according to one expert.


Via Allison Anthony
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Immigration Remakes and Sustains New York, Report Finds

Immigration Remakes and Sustains New York, Report Finds | Human Geography | Scoop.it
A new report says the city’s immigrant population has reached a high of 3.1 million, led by a tremendous growth in the Chinese population.

Via Mr. David Burton
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