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Drought Drains Lake Mead to Lowest Level

Drought Drains Lake Mead to Lowest Level | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The largest reservoir in the U.S. falls to its lowest water level in history, Nevada State Sen. Tick Segerblom introduced a bill title and issued a press release on July 8 calling for an 'independent scientific and economic audit of the Bureau of Reclamation’s strategies for Colorado River management.'"

 

This week’s history-making, bad-news event at Lake Mead has already triggered lots of news stories, but almost all of these stories focus on the water supply for Las Vegas, Phoenix and California. But what about the health of the river itself?

 

Tags: physical, fluvial, drought, water, environment.


Via Seth Dixon
Tom Franta's insight:

Many geographers are aware that future water resource issues in the American Southwest will have political, cultural, and social impacts.  What do you believe to be some approaching concerns after reading this article?

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 12, 2014 3:09 AM

Consequences of urbanisation 

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 12, 2014 3:10 AM

Option topic : Inland water and management

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Topography of Religion

Topography of Religion | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The Pew survey sorts people into major groupings--Christians; other religions, including Jewish and Muslim; and 'unaffiliated,' which includes atheist, agnostic and 'nothing in particular.'  Roll your cursor over the map to see how faiths and traditions break down by state."


Via Seth Dixon
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Interactive map showing religion by state

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Ignacio Quintana's curator insight, December 1, 2014 6:56 PM

Even though this is just an info-graphic, this is very interesting. What we can see from this map is the spatial organization of religion specifically in the U.S. It's interesting to see how protestant makes up the majority (but apparently not according to the article above this from Haak's page) and how drastically these views can change from coast to coast, and state to state. What I find particularly interesting is that you can clearly find hearths of many of these religions, for example, Utah has an extremely out-numbering amount of Mormons. For obvious reasons that is, but still very educational to see the centers of many of the big religions in the United States.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, January 28, 8:46 PM

Looking at the map, it looks like the Northeast is predominately Catholic while the further South you go along the Eastern coast, you find more Protestants, mostly Evangelical, especially in the from Confederate States. The Mid and Northwest seems to hold a healthy mix of all the Christian denominations while places in the Southwest have a higher Catholic percentage, my guess would be from immigration from Mexico. The one odd ball out in the Southwest is Utah with its 58% of Mormons.

Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 4:04 PM

Different cultural religions and senses of place in America. This graph shows the diversity of religion around the united states as it varies from place to place. 

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Do you know Africa?

Do you know Africa? | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Many of Africa’s leaders will be in town next week attending a White House summit. The continent’s land is shared among 49 countries — many of which rarely make U.S. headlines. How familiar are you with Africa’s geography?
Tom Franta's insight:
Even though this site offers what I may call "old school geography" of location rather than the newer human geography pedagogy, but I still feel it is important to know WHERE in the world you are when you are talking about worldly events.
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The 27 Maps That Explain America

The 27 Maps That Explain America | Human Geography | Scoop.it
“Want to understand this fascinating country? Check out these maps. (The 27 Maps That Explain America - http://t.co/8WCZihLGn0 - Fantastic insights and a MUST view!”
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Moses Was Wrong: Avoid Sprawl, Infill Cities (And Teams)

Moses Was Wrong: Avoid Sprawl, Infill Cities (And Teams) | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Social and work communities thrive in close proximity. Fight urban or corporate sprawl with infilling.
Tom Franta's insight:
The article refers to the idea as "infilling" but many human geographers think of it as "smart growth". The story talks about some interesting insights on how smart growth can relate to successful urban business endeavors.
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Immigration nation - Episode 3

Australia, built on the backs of migrant workers, now claims to be a beacon of human rights and equality. But not so long ago, racism reared its ugly head in the form of the 'White Australia policy' – a policy designed to keep people of colour out.
Tom Franta's insight:
Interesting video episode about the effects of immigration on Australia.
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Place-based Geography Videos

Place-based Geography Videos | Human Geography | Scoop.it

Professor Seth Dixon shares over 50 of his favorite geography videos in this online map http://bit.ly/KDY6C2


Via Seth Dixon, Mr Inniss
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Matt Davidson's curator insight, October 23, 2014 7:54 PM

Great site - showing locational context is important for not just Geography but every subject. How can we understand the complexities of topics like conflict or urban economies or agricultural histories.... without understanding locations and maps?

Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 3, 2014 12:02 PM

It was nice to see where everything was happening. I hope it gets updated to more current events. I wish we had something like this when we were looking at the invasion of Kuwait.

Caroline Ivy's curator insight, March 15, 5:19 PM

Seth Dixon uses ArgGIS to juxtapose maps with the location a video is associated with. 

 

This idea has crossed my mind before. Now, a video can be contemplated with the spatial accuracy needed. This connects events to a place, and can help students more fully grasp the geospatial distribution of events. 

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Welcome to 'Geography Education'

Welcome to 'Geography Education' | Human Geography | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/ (organized by the APHG curriculum).  Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab above.


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Helen Rowling's curator insight, September 28, 2014 6:30 PM

Use updates to filter through and be collated in your most frequented tools.

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 18, 2014 2:10 PM

Geography and current events

Olivier Tabary's curator insight, November 28, 2014 12:06 PM

Many interesting tools to practice and to discover

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World War II Led to a Revolution in Cartography

World War II Led to a Revolution in Cartography | Human Geography | Scoop.it
"More Americans came into contact with maps during World War II than in any previous moment in American history. From the elaborate and innovative inserts in the National Geographic to the schematic and tactical pictures in newspapers, maps were everywhere. On September 1, 1939, the Nazis invaded Poland, and by the end of the day a map of Europe could not be bought anywhere in the United States. In fact, Rand McNally reported selling more maps and atlases of the European theaters in the first two weeks of September than in all the years since the armistice of 1918. Two years later, the attack on Pearl Harbor again sparked a demand for maps."
Via Seth Dixon
Tom Franta's insight:
Author and reporter Susan Schutten writes this article explaining how history and cartography came to an important crossroads during the World War II era and the importance of maps to the public during this time. The author focuses on how one map maker, Richard Edes Harrison revolutionalized the image of maps to the public. Good article to tie the basics of geography, maps, with an historical era, World War II.
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Global Multidimensional Poverty Index

Global Multidimensional Poverty Index | Human Geography | Scoop.it
"The global Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI) is an international measure of acute poverty covering over 100 developing countries. It complements traditional income-based poverty measures by capturing the severe deprivations that each person faces at the same time with respect to education, health and living standards."
Tom Franta's insight:
The Global Multidimensional Poverty Index is an attempt to look at how poverty levels across the world affect individuals. From the article: "The MPI can be used to create a comprehensive picture of people living in poverty, and permits comparisons both across countries, regions and the world and within countries by ethnic group, urban/rural location, as well as other key household and community characteristics." What could be some positives as well as some concerns using this new MPI compared to other poverty indexes being used to measure not just poverty but also wellness?
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Refugee Camp for Syrians in Jordan Evolves as a Do-It-Yourself City

Refugee Camp for Syrians in Jordan Evolves as a Do-It-Yourself City | Human Geography | Scoop.it
“As the sprawling Zaatari camp evolves into an informal city — with an economy and even gentrification — aid workers say camps can be potential urban incubators that benefit host countries like Jordan.”
Via Seth Dixon
Tom Franta's insight:
This is an interesting study of the refugee camps of Azraq and Zaatari in the country of Jordan. With more than 50 million people worldwide categorized as refugees, who have been forced to leave their homes and countries, this crisis is straining neighboring poor countries. Zaatari has a current population of about 40,000 and may grow to 100,000. A novice may believe development in these camps like described in Zaatari would be beneficial to all, but as the article describes, there is a cost, especially to the lower classes of the Jordanian population. The refugee camp of Azraq is described as being much less able to develop due to mostly government controls. The article can springboard a great discussion about the refugee crisis.
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Where the World's Young People Live - The Atlantic

Where the World's Young People Live - The Atlantic | Human Geography | Scoop.it
“Where the World's Young People Live The Atlantic To mark the occasion, Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty has developed an infographic that dramatically captures the global geography of age these days, first in a map, then in a mesmerizing series of...”
Tom Franta's insight:
There are many who recognize the shifting population patterns found around the globe. This writer talks about "Investing in Our Youth" as a world theme. If we do decide to invest in our youth, where do we see that much investment needs to take place? What are some ideas for this investment? We should see that investing in our youth will not only help the youth, in particular, but will also aid the societies of where these largest concentrations of youngsters are located.
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US, China look to energy for common ground amid friction

US, China look to energy for common ground amid friction | Human Geography | Scoop.it
“ Energy is a rare bright spot amid otherwise tense relations between the US and China ahead of an annual summit between the two superpowers this week.”
Tom Franta's insight:
Interesting to consider how geography will affect future US-China political relations.
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Drought Drains Lake Mead to Lowest Level

Drought Drains Lake Mead to Lowest Level | Human Geography | Scoop.it
"The largest reservoir in the U.S. falls to its lowest water level in history, Nevada State Sen. Tick Segerblom introduced a bill title and issued a press release on July 8 calling for an 'independent scientific and economic audit of the Bureau of Reclamation’s strategies for Colorado River management.'"This week’s history-making, bad-news event at Lake Mead has already triggered lots of news stories, but almost all of these stories focus on the water supply for Las Vegas, Phoenix and California. But what about the health of the river itself?Tags: physical, fluvial, drought, water, environment.
Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 12, 2014 3:09 AM

Consequences of urbanisation 

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 12, 2014 3:10 AM

Option topic : Inland water and management

Tom Franta's curator insight, July 12, 2014 11:40 AM

Many geographers are aware that future water resource issues in the American Southwest will have political, cultural, and social impacts.  What do you believe to be some approaching concerns after reading this article?

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Twitter

Twitter | Human Geography | Scoop.it
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MapMaker Interactive

“Use our tools to explore the world, learn about human and physical patterns, and make your own maps.”
Tom Franta's insight:
I have used the mapmaker interactive myself as a teacher to create particular regional maps as well as with students to have them create specific area maps. I find this a really nice resource,for making basic maps.
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Geography Matters Even if it Doesn't

Geography Matters Even if it Doesn't | Human Geography | Scoop.it
“Acemoglu and Robinson have been running a series of posts on the work of James Scott. Their latest regards the role of geography versus institutions. Their post is an explanation for why the disper...”
Tom Franta's insight:
Think about the connection between underdevelopment in Asia and Africa with imperialism and post colonial political influences in these continents, this article may likely be a bit oversimplified but what about these insights are not true in emphasizing the strong relationship between geographic,site and situation with economic development.
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Water is a human right, but who is considered a human being? - Aljazeera.com

Water is a human right, but who is considered a human being? - Aljazeera.com | Human Geography | Scoop.it
“Water is a human right, but who is considered a human being? Aljazeera.com Today, one's relative humanity - and the rights which accompany it - is shaped by race, class, gender, and geography.”
Tom Franta's insight:
It is an interesting article about water, and how it currently has and will definitely continue to have political ramifications. In America, it is hard to believe that people in this world are unable to acquire sufficient water...it would likely surprise many readers about the number of Americans who also are losing their water supplies.
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What is Geo-literacy?

"Geo-literacy is a new term for a long-standing idea consisting of three components: interactions, interconnections and implications. It is the ability to use geographic understanding and geographic reasoning to make far-reaching decisions. Whether we are making decisions about where to live or what precautions to take for natural hazards, we all make decisions that require geo-literacy throughout our lives. This video illustrates what geo-literacy means to individuals, and to our shared global community. Share it with your friends, family, and colleagues, to help spread the word."


Via Seth Dixon, Mr Inniss
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Adam Lenaarts's curator insight, September 30, 2013 6:33 PM

Geo literacy explained to all people that don't know I Teacher Much more than just places...

Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 1, 2013 10:32 AM

Geo-literacy extends far beyond knowing where places are on a map.  National Geographic Education has put an emphasis on geo-literacy, which entails spatial thinking skills and understanding systems in addition to content knowledge about locations and places.

Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 28, 2014 11:09 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the concepts of geo-literacy and spatial perspective because it indicates that for a population to be knowledgeable about geography, it must go above the mere rote memorization of toponyms and instead explore the spatial characteristics of places.

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Start-of-the-Year Videos

Start-of-the-Year Videos | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"This is a compilation of videos that can be used to at the beginning of the school year to show the importance of geography, spatial thinking and geo-literacy."


Via Seth Dixon, Mr Inniss
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Jaiden VerSteeg's comment, August 29, 2013 11:41 PM
I watched video #1 and I thought it was very interesting. It was a great way to show what we are going to be learning about. I am really looking forward to learning about it.
Alexandria Goodyk's comment, August 29, 2013 11:59 PM
I watched video #3 and it's crazy how one video can give us so much information. I am so excited to learn new things this year and get educated with all of this stuff.
Richard Miles's curator insight, September 5, 2013 7:29 PM

Great little starters to get the students engaged with Geography!

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'Unruly Places': the weird charm of geographical oddities - The Seattle Times

'Unruly Places': the weird charm of geographical oddities - The Seattle Times | Human Geography | Scoop.it
“'Unruly Places': the weird charm of geographical oddities The Seattle Times In 47 pithy essays, Bonnett, a professor of social geography at Newcastle University, serves up geographical oddities, anomalies and specters for his readers' delectation.”
Tom Franta's insight:
British author Alastair Bonnett gives our obsession a more dignified name than we’re used to (“psychogeography,” “topophilia”). But make no mistake: If you’re someone who can happily while away the hours leafing through old atlases or scrolling through Google Maps, this is the book for you.
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“A Short History of the Highrise”

“A Short History of the Highrise” | Human Geography | Scoop.it
“Watch a four-part interactive documentary about the fascinating past, present and future of high-rise living in cities around the world.”
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Democrats poised to pick GOP's lock on Florida - Baltimore Post-Examiner

Democrats poised to pick GOP's lock on Florida - Baltimore Post-Examiner | Human Geography | Scoop.it
“Baltimore Post-Examiner Democrats poised to pick GOP's lock on Florida Baltimore Post-Examiner But Republicans managed to get around the rule in time for the 2012 elections, arguing with straight faces that the 17-10 congressional split that...”
Tom Franta's insight:
In Florida, Republicans send 10 more representatives to the House in Washington, DC, than the Democrats do. Look at the Florida map of congressional districts. Do you believe this is a 'geographic coincidence' or do you believe that this map has been drawn to favor one political party over the other? This is a good example of gerrymandering and can lead to US political geography discussions about the amount of time and energy that representatives put into drawing congressional districts in some states. Do students understand the implications of this political geography?
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Gendered Cultural Narratives

Gendered Cultural Narratives | Human Geography | Scoop.it
"As a Muslim woman who chooses to wear hijab,I'd like to apologize for this poster, to my non-hijab wearing cohorts. http://pic.twitter.com/IoLfDPEGx7”;
Via Seth Dixon
Tom Franta's insight:
This poster stirred much controversy in Iran and other areas f the Middle East. The wearing of the hijab in different parts of the world have social and political meanings and sometimes conservative governments attempt to use this sort of tradition to help gain solidarity. The hijab in many parts of the world is a clash between traditional folk values coming up against the pressure of conforming popular culture. Look at the poster and think about why it created so much controversy in the Middle East.
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Drought Drains Lake Mead to Lowest Level

Drought Drains Lake Mead to Lowest Level | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The largest reservoir in the U.S. falls to its lowest water level in history, Nevada State Sen. Tick Segerblom introduced a bill title and issued a press release on July 8 calling for an 'independent scientific and economic audit of the Bureau of Reclamation’s strategies for Colorado River management.'"

 

This week’s history-making, bad-news event at Lake Mead has already triggered lots of news stories, but almost all of these stories focus on the water supply for Las Vegas, Phoenix and California. But what about the health of the river itself?

 

Tags: physical, fluvial, drought, water, environment.


Via Seth Dixon
Tom Franta's insight:

Many geographers are aware that future water resource issues in the American Southwest will have political, cultural, and social impacts.  What do you believe to be some approaching concerns after reading this article?

more...
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 12, 2014 3:09 AM

Consequences of urbanisation 

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 12, 2014 3:10 AM

Option topic : Inland water and management

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Uncontacted tribe in Brazil ends its isolation

Uncontacted tribe in Brazil ends its isolation | Human Geography | Scoop.it
“ Anthropologists worry about the threat from infections and resource conflicts (“@ScienceNews: Uncontacted tribe in Brazil ends isolation...”
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