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11 Facts About Food Deserts

11 Facts About Food Deserts | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Food insecurity has a high correlation with increased diabetes rates. In Chicago, the death rate from diabetes in a food desert is twice that of areas with access to grocery stores."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 16, 12:27 PM

Food deserts are places where residents have limited access to healthy food.  Here is a great map from the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture that shows low-income census tract that are more than one mile from supermarkets and rural areas that are more than 10 miles from the nearest supermarket.  Esri has also produced a food desert map that shows where unserved people (farther than 1 mile in urban/10 miles in rural) live in poverty.  For a household with a private automobile, distance to a supermarket isn’t that crucial an issue, but without an automobile, this lack of healthy food available becomes a significant challenge for residents that live in this neighborhood.  

 

Tags: food, urban, povertyplace, socioeconomic, food desert.

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The Weirdest Town Names In All 50 States

The Weirdest Town Names In All 50 States | Human Geography | Scoop.it
A map produced by real estate website Estately found the weirdest town name for every state in America, including Booger Hole, WV, and Old Roach, CO.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 19, 9:29 PM

I know, I know.  You have a better name that should be on this map of strange toponyms.   Having driven MANY times from San Diego to Utah, I'm kind of partial to Zzyzx, CA...just because.  What's you favorite toponym? What value is there is having a strange name for a town?  How does a place name contribute to the local sense of place?   

Tags: place, toponyms.

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D.C. Votes Overwhelmingly To Become 51st State

D.C. Votes Overwhelmingly To Become 51st State | Human Geography | Scoop.it
District of Columbia voters passed the referendum Tuesday with nearly 80 percent in favor. Congress, which will ultimately decide the fate of the federal district, is not expected to approve it.

 

Voters in the District of Columbia passed a measure on Tuesday in favor of petitioning Congress to become a state in the union.

79 percent of voters cast votes in favor of the ballot measure, which splits the district into a residential state with a small federal district in the middle of it for government buildings and monuments, as we have reported.

The newly approved measure had four parts:

agree that the District should be admitted to the Union as the State of New Columbiaapprove of a Constitution of the State of New Columbia to be adopted by the Councilapprove the State of New Columbia's boundariesagree that the State of New Columbia shall guarantee an elected representative form of government.
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 11, 3:56 PM

Questions to Ponder: Why do the residents of the District of Columbia want to change the legal status of the District to a state?  Why might some states and politicians NOT want to see a 51st state?  What is needed in the United States to admit a new state (Puerto Rico is still a possibility to become the 51st state)?  

 

Tags: political, sovereignty, autonomy, Washington DC.

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US election 2016: Trump victory in maps

US election 2016: Trump victory in maps | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The map above shows where Mr Trump improved on the share of the vote achieved by Mitt Romney, the Republican presidential candidate who failed to beat President Barack Obama in 2012.

 

Tags: electoral, political.


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27 stunning satellite images that will change how you see our world - Geoawesomeness

27 stunning satellite images that will change how you see our world - Geoawesomeness | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The images come from the amazing book called “Overview: A New Perspective of Earth”. that just hit the stores around the world. The book is a stunning and unique collection of satellite images of Earth that offer an unexpected look at humanity, derived from the wildly popular Daily Overview Instagram account followed by almost 0.5 million people."

 

Hagadera, seen here on the right, is the largest section of the Dadaab Refugee Camp in Northern Kenya and is home to 100,000 refugees. To cope with the growing number of displaced Somalis arriving at Dadaab, the UN has begun moving people into a new area called the LFO extension, seen here on the left. Dadaab is the largest refugee camp in the world with an estimated total population of 400,000.


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U.S. Students Are Really Bad at Geography

U.S. Students Are Really Bad at Geography | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Your kid has no idea where Saudi Arabia – or maybe even South Carolina – is. Here's why.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 22, 2:40 PM

The U.S. government report on 8th grade geography is not a 'pick-me-up' but a sobering reminder of the task that lays before us.  This article quotes a few alliance coordinators on the current situation and how to change it. 

 

TagseducationK12geography education.

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Will saving poor children lead to overpopulation?

Hans Rosling explains a very common misunderstanding about the world. CC by www.gapminder.org

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 27, 2014 8:05 AM

Tags: population, demographic transition model, declining population, demographicsmodels, gapminderdevelopment.

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, January 28, 2014 6:18 PM

A clear explanation of how saving the poor will slow population growth.

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Environmental Possibilism Vs. Environmental Determinism

Environmental Possibilism Vs. Environmental Determinism | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Environmental possibilism and determinism are theories, put forth in order to comprehend and understand the role played by the physical environmental conditions in the emergence and progress of any human culture or society in a particular location."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 13, 8:15 AM

This article outlines differences between environmental determinism and environmental possibilism.  Authors such as Robert Kaplan (Revenge of Geography---see a review here) and Jared Diamond (Guns, Germs, and Steel) have been accused of being too environmentally deterministic.  Read Jared Diamond's retort to his critics here. 

 

Questions to Ponder: In what ways does the environment shape human culture(s)?  Why is Jared Diamond critical of skeptics who use the phrase ‘environmental determinism?’Why might some of Kaplan’s ideas as well as the ideas of classical geopolitics be considered ‘environmental determinism?' Can the role of physical geography be overstated in culture, economics or politics? Give three examples when it might be inappropriate. 

 

Tags: environment, religion, cultureunit 1 GeoPrinciples.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 13, 12:42 PM

This article outlines differences between environmental determinism and environmental possibilism.  Authors such as Robert Kaplan (Revenge of Geography---see a review here) and Jared Diamond (Guns, Germs, and Steel) have been accused of being too environmentally deterministic.  Read Jared Diamond's retort to his critics here. 

 

Questions to Ponder: In what ways does the environment shape human culture(s)?  Why is Jared Diamond critical of skeptics who use the phrase ‘environmental determinism?’Why might some of Kaplan’s ideas as well as the ideas of classical geopolitics be considered ‘environmental determinism?' Can the role of physical geography be overstated in culture, economics or politics? Give three examples when it might be inappropriate. 

 

Tags: environment, religion, cultureunit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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Why Italy’s 'Fertility Day' is backfiring

Why Italy’s 'Fertility Day' is backfiring | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Facing a low fertility rate (1.4), Italy is holding its first 'Fertility Day' on Sept. 22, which will emphasize 'the beauty of motherhood and fatherhood' and host roundtable discussions on fertility and reproductive health. That may seem inoffensive, but the country’s health department is trying to raise awareness with an ad campaign that’s striking many as misguided and, worse, sexist and alarmist."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 2, 8:47 AM

This pro-natalist campaign designed by the health ministry has received near universal criticism (in an attempt to see other perspectives, I searched for a more positive or even neutral article on the topic and came up empty-handed).  Italy's Prime Minister openly scoffed at the premise of the campaign, and many pundits argue that it shames and pressures women into thinking about personal choices of childbearing as if they were communal responsibilities.  Unlike the infamous 'Do it For Denmark' advertisements that were filled with playful innuendos, or Singapore's 'Maybe Baby' which highlights the joys of parenthood, this one has more overtones of duty and plays on fear more than those other pro-natalist campaigns.      

 

Tags:  ItalyEurope, declining populations, population, demographic transition model, modelsunit 2 population. 

 

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 5, 7:28 AM
Preliminary - population
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#GeoEdu16 Research from Routledge

#GeoEdu16 Research from Routledge | Human Geography | Scoop.it

As the proud publisher of both Journal of Geography and The Geography Teacher, the official publications of the National Council for Geographic Education, we couldn't be more excited to join the NCGE in Tampa for #GeoEdu16. We will be offering NCGE members and attendees FREE ACCESS to specially selected content which reflects core themes of this special meeting: AP Human Geography, Race and Ethnicity, Climate Change and Human Migration, Coastal Geography, Geospatial Technology in the Classroom, Electoral Geography, and National Park Service!


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 29, 9:45 AM

The National Council for Geographic Education is having their 101th conference this week (#GeoEdu16).  The Journal of Geography and The Geography Teacher are fabulous resources produced by NCGE for geography educators (and great reasons to become a member of NCGE).  The recent APHG special edition is among the free downloads that will be available through the end of this year, so start downloading!  

 

Tags: NCGEAPHG, geography education, teacher training.

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Surging Seas Interactive Map

Surging Seas Interactive Map | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Global warming has raised global sea level about 8" since 1880, and the rate of rise is accelerating. Rising seas dramatically increase the odds of damaging floods from storm surges.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 27, 1:27 PM

This interactive map from Climate Central dramatically shows what locations are most vulnerable to sea level rise.  You can adjust the map to display anywhere from 1 to 10 feet of sea level rise to compare the impact to coastal communities.  This dynamic map lets to view other layers to contextualize potential sea level rise by toggling on layers that include, population density, ethnicity, income, property and social vulnerability.   

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, climate change, environment, resources, watercoastalmapping, visualization, environment depend, political ecology.

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Where Are the World’s Slaves?

Where Are the World’s Slaves? | Human Geography | Scoop.it
WORLD More than 45 million people are living in modern slavery, with Asia accounting for two-thirds of the victims, a new report says. (Quartz) Use our timeline to learn more about the ugly history of legal slavery in the United States. Teachers, scroll down for a quick list of key resources in our Teachers Toolkit,…

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, June 1, 1:21 PM
Do your students think slavery is only in the past?
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The Challenges of Teaching Students About Black Lives Matter

The Challenges of Teaching Students About Black Lives Matter | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The lengthy timelines of publishing new history textbooks—and the problematic narratives those books often present—push primary resources to the forefront of current-events education.

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, July 25, 11:53 AM
Great look at what happens when events won't hit history textbooks for years - how to use primary sources for current events and issues in the classroom.
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Bamenda protests: Mass arrests in Cameroon

Bamenda protests: Mass arrests in Cameroon | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Some 100 people are arrested after protests against using French in Cameroon's English-speaking region.

 

Areas controlled by Britain and France joined to form Cameroon after the colonial powers withdrew in the 1960s. The country has 10 semi-autonomous administrative regions - eight are Francophone and use the French civil law. English-speakers have long complained that they face discrimination. They often complain that they are excluded from top civil service jobs and that government documents are often only published in French, even though English is also an official language. Bamenda is the founding place of Cameroon's largest opposition political party, the Social Democratic Front.

 

Tags: language, colonialism, Cameroon, Africa, culture,  political, devolution.


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Global State of Agriculture

Global State of Agriculture | Human Geography | Scoop.it

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 1, 2014 10:30 AM

Unit V, main idea of the unit!

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 15, 2014 10:00 AM

Unit 5

Mrs. B's curator insight, March 23, 6:02 AM

This conveys some important realities about the demographic necessities of agriculture, the economic impact and the cultural differences in agricultural production. As with all long infographics on this site, you can "scroll down" on the image by putting the cursor in the top right-hand corner of the image and sliding on the translucent bar. 


Tags: agriculture, infographic, unit 5 agriculture.

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Election Cartograms

Election Cartograms | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The states are colored red or blue to indicate whether a majority of their voters voted for the Republican candidate, Donald Trump, or the Democratic candidate, Hillary Clinton, respectively. There is significantly more red on a traditional election maps than there is blue, but that is in some ways misleading: the election was much closer than you might think from the balance of colors, and in fact Clinton won slightly more votes than Trump overall. The explanation for this apparent paradox, as pointed out by many people, is that the map fails to take account of the population distribution. It fails to allow for the fact that the population of the red states is on average significantly lower than that of the blue ones.

We can correct for this by making use of a cartogram, a map in which the sizes of states are rescaled according to their population. That is, states are drawn with size proportional not to their acreage but to the number of their inhabitants, states with more people appearing larger than states with fewer, regardless of their actual area on the ground. On such a map, for example, the state of Rhode Island, with its 1.1 million inhabitants, would appear about twice the size of Wyoming, which has half a million, even though Wyoming has 60 times the acreage of Rhode Island."

 

Tags: electoral, scale, political, density, mapping.


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How Eratosthenes calculated the Earth's circumference

"In the mid-20th century we began launching satellites into space that would help us determine the exact circumference of the Earth: 40,030 km. But over 2000 years earlier, a man in Ancient Greece came up with nearly the exact same figure using just a stick and his brain."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 1, 1:19 PM

Eratosthenes is often referred to as the "father of geography" for creating meridians and parallels on his maps to organize global information, classifying climatic zones, and as shown in the video, calculating the circumference of the Earth. Plus, he coined the terms so he gets the credit. If you have never pondered the meaning of the word "geometry," the accomplishments of Eratosthenes will certainly show that the mathematical prowess was at the heart of expanding our collective geographic knowledge (additionally, here is a retro Carl Sagan in a video clip from Cosmos that inspired this clip).    

 

Tagsmapping, math, locationSTEM, historical.

ROCAFORT's curator insight, November 18, 3:07 AM
How Eratosthenes calculated the Earth's circumference
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Four maps that explain the chaos of the Middle East

Four maps that explain the chaos of the Middle East | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Without trying to defend or absolve U.S. policy, then, it is worth stepping back to ask what shared historical experiences might have left these four countries — Iraq, Syria, Libya and Yemen — particularly at risk of violent collapse. The following maps help highlight how, at various points over the past century, historical circumstances conspired, in an often self-reinforcing way, to bolster the stability of some states in the region while undermining that of others."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 19, 4:31 PM

These maps are not cartographically inspiring, but the it's the historical and political insight that makes them valuable. The goal of this set of maps is to find some underlying causal reasons for political stability(or more importantly instability) in the Middle East. These four maps focus on these key issues:

1. Century-old states are more stable today

2. Colonial rule led to fragile states

3. Instability and regime change

4. The shadow of the Cold War

 

Tags: MiddleEast, war, conflict, political, geopoliticshistorical.

Kelly Bellar's curator insight, October 22, 9:30 AM

These maps are not cartographically inspiring, but the it's the historical and political insight that makes them valuable. The goal of this set of maps is to find some underlying causal reasons for political stability(or more importantly instability) in the Middle East. These four maps focus on these key issues:

1. Century-old states are more stable today

2. Colonial rule led to fragile states

3. Instability and regime change

4. The shadow of the Cold War

 

Tags: MiddleEast, war, conflict, political, geopoliticshistorical.

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Introducing ISIS

"The invasion of Iraq was supposed to turn the country into a democracy that posed no threat to the United States, or the rest of the world. Thirteen years later, Iraq has collapsed into three warring states. A third of the country is controlled by ISIS, who have also taken huge amounts of territory in Syria. VICE correspondent Ben Anderson gains exclusive access to the three front lines in Iraq, where Sunni, Shiite and Kurdish forces are fighting for their lives. Anderson visits with the Russian military forces in Syria, meets captured ISIS fighters in Kurdistan, and interviews US policymakers about how the situation in Iraq spun out of control."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 13, 2:15 PM

Many young students are especially baffled at how a terrorist organization can seize control of large chunks of territory.  If you are looking for a good video introduction that explains how and why ISIS was able to gain power and than gain and maintain territory, this is it (it's classroom safe despite the source). 

 

Tags: Syria, war, conflict, political, geopolitics, Iraq, devolution, terrorism, ISISMiddle East.

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Turkey's 'bumpy ride' into the EU?

Turkey's 'bumpy ride' into the EU? | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"As the UK prepares for what looks like a slow and painful divorce from the European Union, the people of Turkey are wondering how their relationship with Europe will now develop.

The government in Ankara has been seeking to strengthen its case to join the EU, but as Europe grapples with Brexit - is the Turkey's membership closer or further away?"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 31, 4:48 PM

This video show some of the recent shifts in the always important, often rocky Turkey/EU relationship.   Economically, Turkey has consistently sought greater ties with Europe for the past few decades and Europe keeps Turkey at arms length.    Turkey has applied to join the EU, but that is not going to happen without some massive social restructuring that would take years. 

 

Tags: EuropeTurkey, supranationalism, economicrefugees, political, video.

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Map Men: teaching geography through comedy

Map Men: teaching geography through comedy | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Mark Cooper-Jones and Jay Foreman, the Map Men, tap into a rich vein of geographical quirks to teach through comedy

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, August 28, 8:11 PM

Feeling lost teaching geography? Navigate your way through the new concepts, skills and content in the new Australian Curriculum and K-6 syllabus by developing geographical understanding.

Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, August 29, 12:43 PM
Holy heck these guys are good! I'd like to see more of these Map Men videos. I'm sure at least some of my 8th graders can appreciate some British wit.
Christopher L. Story's curator insight, August 29, 9:24 PM
Anything to help people know where the Caspian sea resides...or was that Uzbekistan?
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When Mexico Was Flooded By Immigrants

When Mexico Was Flooded By Immigrants | Human Geography | Scoop.it
In the early nineteenth-century, Mexico had a problem with American immigrants.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 29, 4:53 PM
A century and a half ago, the immigration debate and geopolitical shifts in power on the United States-Mexico border reflected a profoundly different dynamic than it does today.  This history has enduring cultural impacts on southwestern states that had the international border jump them.

 

Tags: culture, demographicsmigration, North Americahistorical, colonialism, borders, political.

Ken Feltman's curator insight, July 31, 7:56 AM
Turning the tables...
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The dirty little secret that data journalists aren’t telling you

The dirty little secret that data journalists aren’t telling you | Human Geography | Scoop.it
How to tell two radically different stories with the same dataset.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 27, 3:57 PM

Mapping matters, but that doesn't mean that maps convey an objective truth.  They are rhetorical devices used to convince and persuade.  So approach maps critically because while they can convey great spatial patterns, they can conceal patterns just as easily.  

 

Tagsstatisticscartography, visualization, mapping.

Jose Sepulveda's curator insight, July 29, 1:19 PM
thee precaution should be taken with environmental data published as integrated variable maps   
Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, August 4, 9:12 AM
Maps, like statistics, can tell very different stories using the same information!  Read this for some examples!
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Half the World Lives on 1% of Its Land, Mapped

Half the World Lives on 1% of Its Land, Mapped | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Data viz extraordinaire Max Galka created this map using NASA’s gridded population data, which counts the global population within each nine-square-mile patch of Earth, instead of within each each district, state, or country border. Out of the 28 million total cells, the ones with a population over 8,000 are colored in yellow."

 

Tags: population, density, mapping, visualization.


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Brian Weekley's curator insight, July 27, 10:47 AM
Great simple map of world population.  Scroll down and look at the U.S.  It reflects the global trend.  This also has political implications, as evidenced by voting patterns in the 2012 presidential election.  Elections are dependent upon votes, which come from people, which are primarily clustered in cities.  Election campaigns would use this data to plan their schedules as to where to focus their campaigning efforts.  For the folks in Wyoming, they rarely see candidates other than during the primaries.  And these world populationclusters have been relatively consistent historically, particularly in south and east Asia.  Northern India has serious carrying capacity challenges. Notice the clusters along the Nile- evidence of arable land.
Francisco Restivo's curator insight, August 8, 5:49 PM
Fantastic visualization!
David W. Deeds's curator insight, August 8, 5:55 PM

Geeky-cool stuff! Thanks to Jim Lerman.

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What's the Difference Between England, Britain and the U.K.?

What's the Difference Between England, Britain and the U.K.? | Human Geography | Scoop.it

Listen up, would-be Anglophiles: Here's how never to mess up your realms, kingdoms and empires again
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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, July 8, 12:34 PM
Easy to read explanation (with a graphic!) of the differences between England, Britain, and the UK, plus protectorates, allegiances, and all kinds of others.