Human Geography
Follow
Find
217 views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Matt Richardson from Geography Education
onto Human Geography
Scoop.it!

The Case for Cul-de-Sacs

The Case for Cul-de-Sacs | Human Geography | Scoop.it
People who live in them actually have greater social cohesion, according to one sociologist.

 

Thomas R. Hochschild Jr. actually first encountered the social cohesion of cul-de-sacs in his latest research when he wandered into one in Connecticut with his clipboard and polo shirt, and someone called the cops.  That never happened on the other types of streets he was studying, places where it would turn out the neighbors didn't know each other as well, and it was less clear who "belonged." Repeatedly, though, he found at the end of cul-de-sacs families who watched each others' children and took in each others' mail, who barbequed and orchestrated the removal of snow together, and who considered each other close friends. In cul-de-sacs, these families had a stronger sense of shared social space and territoriality. An outsider stood out.


Via Seth Dixon
Matt Richardson's insight:

Interesting article about suburban design.

more...
Richard Lloyd Thomas's curator insight, February 23, 3:56 PM

Consider those at home all day without transport or close family, who may be seemingly 'trapped' (with children).

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, February 23, 8:33 PM

Living in a cul-de-sac sounds very inviting.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 24, 1:32 PM

I lived in a col-de-sac for a number of years. My family and I had very close relationships with our two neighbors within our col-de-sac. We had parties together and helped each other out in times of need - this article is spot on.  

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Matt Richardson
Scoop.it!

How air conditioning remade modern America

How air conditioning remade modern America | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Would it surprise you to learn just how revolutionary that A/C unit of yours really is?
Matt Richardson's insight:

Some technologies radically alter the way humans use space. Air conditioning was one of them. The way we live, the way we socialize, and likely the places we choose to inhabit or avoid have been utterly transformed by the humble air conditioning unit. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Richardson
Scoop.it!

India pins hopes on smart cities

India pins hopes on smart cities | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Matt Richardson's insight:

Can urban planning help India organize its multitudes into the future? 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Richardson
Scoop.it!

We Are What We Google: How Search Terms Reflect Our Wealth

We Are What We Google: How Search Terms Reflect Our Wealth | Human Geography | Scoop.it
David Leonhardt recently compared the terms people search for online in places The New York Times figures life is easiest, against the counties where it's hardest. He discusses the results with Robert Siegel.
Matt Richardson's insight:

This fascinating piece compares the way "rich" areas of the U.S. search on Google to that of "poor" areas. It is a revealing cultural snapshot. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Richardson
Scoop.it!

The people designing your cities don’t care what you want. They’re planning for hipsters.

The people designing your cities don’t care what you want. They’re planning for hipsters. | Human Geography | Scoop.it
We obsess over New York and SF. But the future of the American city lies elsewhere.
Matt Richardson's insight:

This is an interesting piece about urban design. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Richardson
Scoop.it!

Map: How much $100 is really worth in every state

Map: How much $100 is really worth in every state | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The purchasing power of a Benjamin spans a $30 range across the nation.
Matt Richardson's insight:

Here is a good piece about the relative value of money ("cost of living") across the United States. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Richardson
Scoop.it!

New dimension for digital cities

New dimension for digital cities | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Can greed and wastefulness be removed from our future cities?
Matt Richardson's insight:

This is an advertisement, but it brings up interesting issues about urban planning and recycling. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Richardson
Scoop.it!

Southeast could become an overdeveloped ‘megalopolis’ in the next half century

Southeast could become an overdeveloped ‘megalopolis’ in the next half century | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The Southeast US is going the way of the Northeast with the creation of an ecologically damaging ‘megalopolis’
Matt Richardson's insight:

Here's an interesting piece about urban sprawl. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Richardson
Scoop.it!

California’s catastrophic drought keeps getting worse

California’s catastrophic drought keeps getting worse | Human Geography | Scoop.it
More than half the state is now experiencing the most intense drought possible.
Matt Richardson's insight:

The California drought is one of the most impactful weather stories of the decade. As the nation's most economically important agricultural region, ongoing lack of water will result in a threat to the food supply.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Richardson
Scoop.it!

Deford: How To Host A Sports Extravaganza That Won't Break The Bank

Deford: How To Host A Sports Extravaganza That Won't Break The Bank | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Building new World Cup or Olympics facilities in different cities every several years is just too costly, says commentator Frank Deford. So why not, he asks, try something different?
Matt Richardson's insight:

This is an interesting piece about how large sporting extravaganzas like the Olympics might serve host nations better by distributing their venues. It is essentially an "industrial location" argument based around the idea that better transportation in the 21st Century makes the concentration of new "disposable" stadiums unjustifiable. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Richardson
Scoop.it!

Iraq disintegrating as insurgents advance toward capital; Kurds seize Kirkuk

The government also lost control of the Kurdish city of Kirkuk as the security forces gave up without a fight
Matt Richardson's insight:

Modern Iraq is a nation created by imperialist powers after World War I. The "new" civil war that erupted two days ago with the swift and effective uprising of Sunni militias has its roots in the nation's founding, as well as in the subsequent brutality of Saddam Hussein's Sunni Arab reign. When the US invaded in 2003, we shattered the stability that Hussein's dictatorship provided. The centrifugal forces of tribalism, sectarianism, regionalism and traditionalism are all driving the instability, in addition to meddling by outside powers such as Iran and the United States. Adding to the problem is a civil war in neighboring Syria and it is easy to see how geography is crucial to understanding the roots of the conflict. Any solution to this problem will also require a deep understanding of the geography of the region. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Richardson
Scoop.it!

Can anything stop West Africa’s outbreak of Ebola?

Matt Richardson's insight:

This terrifying article illustrates geographic concepts related to contagious disease & human response to it. Disease vectors are often related to migration, and medical responses to disease are generally connected to development. Regions like West Africa are particularly vulnerable to infectious disease like Ebola because of weak public health systems. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Richardson
Scoop.it!

Trillions of plastic pieces found in Arctic ice

Trillions of plastic pieces found in Arctic ice | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Arctic Ocean ice may hold trillions of small pieces of plastic and other synthetic trash, and they are being released into the world's oceans as global warming melts the polar cap, researchers say.
Matt Richardson's insight:

Here is a depressing piece about where plastic garbage goes. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Richardson
Scoop.it!

The end of fish

The end of fish | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The ones we like to eat are rapidly vanishing from the ocean.
Matt Richardson's insight:

We humans love sports and celebrity gossip and just about anything else other than true "end of the world" scenarios. However, human created mass extinction of marine life WILL greatly harm our species' ability to survive into the next century. In addition to being a threat to human life, destruction of the ocean ecosystem by pollution and overfishing will also harm the other plants and animals we share the planet with.

 

What are YOU going to do about it? 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Richardson
Scoop.it!

How the Current Mass Extinction of Animals Threatens Humans

How the Current Mass Extinction of Animals Threatens Humans | Human Geography | Scoop.it
We seem indifferent to the mass extinction we're causing, yet we lose a part of ourselves when another animal dies out.
Matt Richardson's insight:

Humans are notoriously self-centered animals. We shape the world according to our own short-term needs, we foul the water and the air, we hunt animals to extinction and shrug when others disappear. This article is a bleak reminder that "environmentalism" is not just a feel-good ideology -- its an essential component of our own future survival, too. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Richardson
Scoop.it!

In St. Louis, Delmar Boulevard is the line that divides a city by race and perspective

In St. Louis, Delmar Boulevard is the line that divides a city by race and perspective | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Delmar Boulevard runs through St. Louis but also divides it.
Matt Richardson's insight:

Geography often determines perspective. In America, and other countries, cities are often separated by race. The reasons for this are complicated and involve socioeconomic factors, history, and racial attitudes. St. Louis is in the news because of the riots in Ferguson, but every city in America has racialized boundaries. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Richardson
Scoop.it!

The island that kids learn to leave

The island that kids learn to leave | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Matt Richardson's insight:

Migration out of Ireland is an old story. Here is the "new" reality of modern Irish emigration.  See if you can identify the push factors that make leaving Ireland more attractive to people than staying.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Richardson
Scoop.it!

Is segregation the problem in Ferguson?

Is segregation the problem in Ferguson? | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Detailed demographic maps show that Ferguson is not nearly as segregated as other parts of the St. Louis area.
Matt Richardson's insight:

Unrest in Ferguson, Missouri after a police shooting of a young, black teenager has inspired a national discussion about what the causes of the shooting and the unrest are. Here is a piece that argues that segregation of blacks from whites in the area is not a cause. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Richardson
Scoop.it!

Plotting the next Silicon Valley -- you'll never guess where - CNET

Plotting the next Silicon Valley -- you'll never guess where - CNET | Human Geography | Scoop.it
special report Crave globe-trotter Eric Mack kicks off an exclusive four-part series on the unlikely Latin American spot hoping to transform itself into a new hub for science, technology, and innovation.
Matt Richardson's insight:

There is no shortage of "planned cities" around the world. The idea is almost an oxymoron, since cities are essentially emergent agglomerations of people and don't just "appear" out of nothing. However, sometimes planned communities work. Here is one that folks in Ecuador hope will take off and bring tertiary jobs to a country with a fairly underdeveloped economy. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Richardson
Scoop.it!

Russia's Atlantis rises again

Russia's Atlantis rises again | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Matt Richardson's insight:

Sometimes cities disappear. Sometimes they re-appear...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Richardson
Scoop.it!

usamap.png (1000×600)

usamap.png (1000×600) | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Matt Richardson's insight:

Here is an interesting map with a list of the richest people by state. I'm not sure what it says about geography, other than that there are a few people around the country who make a lot more money than public school teachers. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Richardson
Scoop.it!

World War One battlefields 100 years on

World War One battlefields 100 years on | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Matt Richardson's insight:

This is a striking series of modern photographs of World War I battlefields. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Richardson
Scoop.it!

This map shows which disease is most likely to kill you depending on where you live

This map shows which disease is most likely to kill you depending on where you live | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Most of the world will die of heart disease.
Matt Richardson's insight:

Here is a map showing which diseases will likely kill people in various places in the world. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Richardson
Scoop.it!

Fight Over Calif. Oyster Company Splits Chefs And Land Defenders

Fight Over Calif. Oyster Company Splits Chefs And Land Defenders | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Drakes Bay Oyster Company is resisting the expiration of its lease in Marin County, Calif. The debate may reach the Supreme Court, and it's dividing residents of the San Francisco Bay Area.
Matt Richardson's insight:

The argument over the fate of this oyster company has been simmering for years. It contains ideological elements ("environmentalists" vs. "libertarians") and questions about who can decide what do use federal land for. It also questions ideas of what "sustainable" means. Coincidentally, the business in question is situated in one of my favorite haunts in California -- a beautiful windswept & watery coast near Point Reyes peninsula. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Richardson
Scoop.it!

Many killed in DR Congo fighting

Many killed in DR Congo fighting | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Matt Richardson's insight:

Tribal and ethnic conflict have plagued Africa for generations. This current spasm of violence in Congo shows the deep cultural and ethnic animosity between certain groups. Often the divisions transcend (and predate) national borders, which in many cases were drawn by outsiders with little consideration of African people. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Richardson
Scoop.it!

The second-largest religion in each state

The second-largest religion in each state | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Matt Richardson's insight:

This is a fascinating & surprising map.

more...
Mr. Gresham's curator insight, July 7, 11:31 AM

With religious liberties currently in the news, this map gives us a nice view of future issues in that field.