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Unit 3: Cultural Syncretism

Unit 3: Cultural Syncretism | Scoop.it project | Scoop.it

This is an example of cultural syncretism, or when two or more cultures come together and form something new.


Via Seth Dixon
Lauren Sellers's insight:

This was taken in Memphis, TN. I liked how it mixes the religion with the surrounding culture and dialect, really interesting and shows that people can have the same religion and different backgrounds. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 8, 2013 8:39 AM

I found this image on social media from a great geography teacher (link to his site--looking for APHG group activities?  Try this).  This picture taken at the Jewish Community Center (JCC) in Memphis, TN shows an intrguing linguistic combination that I had never imagined before.  This is referred to as cultural syncretism, where two or more cultures or cultural traits combine together to make something new.  Globalization and migration are making more cultural combinations than we've ever seen before in this human mosaic we call home.


Tags: language, culture, the South, APHG, religion, landscape.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, December 11, 2013 12:01 AM

Interesting 


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Unit 4: 2008 Election Maps

Unit 4: 2008 Election Maps | Scoop.it project | Scoop.it

As the election year is ramping up, now is a good time to introduce electoral geography (since there are millions of dollars been spent of this type of analysis).  Displayed is the county map of the 2008 presidential election (McCain=red, Obama=blue).  What are the geographic and demographic characteristics of the 2008 voting base of both the Republican and Democratic parties?  This is also a great map to discuss how to interpret maps--how could this map be misleading?  What additional information is needed to contextualize this data?  Follow the link for additional maps that provide attempt to visualize that context.    


Via Seth Dixon
Lauren Sellers's insight:

Electoral college maps can sometimes trick you because it looks like McCain won but although most of mid west is republican there isnt a large population so they dont get as many votes as states with bigger populations like California, New York, Texas, Florida, etc. 

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Elizabeth Allen's comment, September 16, 2012 3:03 PM
At first glance I would assume McCain would win; the map has a higher percentage of red. However, due to population density, we have to consider how many people live in the red areas as compared to the blue. Obama won the election because there are more peolpe/voters in the blue area compared to the red. The colors may be deceiving so we need to consider other factors.
Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, November 12, 2013 1:05 PM

I really enjoyed this article, it was insctieful interesting and had very informitive visual aids. It was very interesting to see all the differnt maps prtayted thoughout the artile. I found that the infomation that they were describing was alot of things I had heard before, but the added affect of the visual aids were able to give me a deeper understading. It also really brings up some key geogragaphical regaions and shows how even thouhg a state might be blue there are still areas(towns, countis) with in the sate that are primarly red party. When this election was going on it sure seemed like it was goiing to be neck and neck, but clearly on election day bule took over .

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 1:01 PM

It is amazing how a map can throw people off. It looks like McCain was winning but at the end Obama has won because more people have voted for him than his competitor. Also in the shaded blue area are much more populated then the areas in red because the red area are surrounded by woods and also the red area is like the suburbs of the city. It is very different how maps are portrayed and how misleading they can be. Never depend on one source find as many as you can to make your interpretations   

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Unit 4: terrorism

Unit 4: terrorism | Scoop.it project | Scoop.it
When Anum Hussain heard about the Boston Marathon bombing, she immediately panicked, worried that the culprits would be like her. The 22-year-old Muslim was in the offices of Hubspot, the Cambridge marketing-software company she works for.

Via Seth Dixon
Lauren Sellers's insight:

Some are saying that racism doesnt exist anymore but it does. Muslims still live in fear that they are being judged everyday because some Americans generalize Muslims with terrorism

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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, September 10, 2013 10:35 AM

A Muslim friend of mine went through hell in high school, and was often called a terrorist.  People used to knock his books over in the hallways and took his religious cap from him.  They would talk behind his back, mock his holy garb, and blame him for events such as the bombing of the twin towers on 9/11/01, which was ridiculous because he was not even a teenager at the time that event happened.  He shall remain nameless for purposes of respect and privacy, but this allusion is in order to establish my opinion that if people had gotten to know more Muslims at a younger age, as I have in this case, they would not associate Muslims with terrorism in their first impressions with these people.  My friend is a kind, musically inclined, and peaceful artist, and I am open to believing that these qualities reflect more accurately what Muslims are about, at least to me, than the negative connotations of dangerous radicals within that religious sect.  It seems the media's portrayal of the truth is more important than the truth itself to many people, for it is weighted with shining gold credibility spoken through shiny white teeth on an HDTV screen in high resolution... not from upset protests by bearded, turban-clad Muslims, however innocent they may actually be. The Muslims that have wonderful qualities have been overshadowed not by the dangerous radicals, but by the extreme portrayals and labelings from the media.

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 20, 2013 3:33 PM

Being from around the area and listening and watching the tv during the boston bombings all I really thought about was how the city and families were effected by the tragic event. However I never really thought about how it impacted muslim people in the area. For people to put a blame on all muslim people is not right. We are not all the same, which means not all muslims are the same. Some muslims have lived their whole lives in the US and for people to catogorize them all as terrorists isn't right. All people should be treated them same way. It is sad to read the article and think that some muslims in Boston walk around in fear of being beat up or killed just because of their culture. The bombings effected an entire city and muslim people people should be able to mourn with the rest of the city. They grew up there just like we did. So what makes them so different from me and you? Not all muslims are killers like the two boys from the bombings. It is really sad to me that they have to live their lives in fear everyday in a place that they call home, just because of their culture. No one deserves to live like that. I can't even imagine how difficult it is for muslim people in Boston. 

Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 10:38 AM

Terrorism is a huge problem in our Country today. I'm not trying to racist saying this but I feel like they do it to themselves. Coming into our country and terrorizing our nation thats okay? Yes not every Muslim is a terrorist im not saying that but you never know if they are or not. Since 911 we cant trust anyone, and theres a reason for that. I understand that they should not have to feel any different then the average American but the past is what we all dwell on.

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Unit 4: political geography

Unit 4: political geography | Scoop.it project | Scoop.it

"The United Kingdom's relationship with the EU - or, in political parlance, 'Europe' - has long been one of the most divisive, emotive issues in British politics."


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GB wants greater European intergration to strengthen their regional power,

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 2, 10:34 AM

The beginnings of the European Union are rooted in the aftermath of WW II, with Europe exhausted from war many politicians wanted to unite European countries in a way that would make war with each other impossible.  The United Kingdom, though has had a complicated with the EU, sometimes (and for certain issues) wanting greater European integration to strengthen their regional position and at other times have resisted regional collaboration for fear of losing national autonomy.  This is very over-generalized, but this BBC article gives a nice historical perspective on the rocky relationship of between the two.  


Tags: Europe, supranationalism, currency, economichistorical, sovereignty, UK.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 2, 5:40 PM

Britain has always participated in its own events of politics and government. They have had a back and forth relationship with the European Union and have had its ups and downs throughout the years. The U.K. doesn't want to conform to the European money system and instead want to keep their own monetary system.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 5, 12:28 PM

The UK's history as an isolated island nation and imperial power has led to a complicated history between them and a unified Europe. While the EU has worked to create a more stable Europe, the UK has been hesitant to give up the autonomy that they believe allowed them to remain powerful in the past. As the politics of the EU have evolved and changed, the UK's commitment and desire to remain within it has also changed. Knowing this, it's easier to see why the relationship between the two is complex and still changing.

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unit 4: political geography

unit 4: political geography | Scoop.it project | Scoop.it
Koreans favor East Sea, while Japan insists it is the Sea of Japan; a proposal would require textbooks to use both.
Lauren Sellers's insight:

In New York, there is a conflict that has risen about the body of water that separates two cities, Brooklyn and Manhatten. Originally called the East River, legislatives want to rename the body of water the Sea of Japan. This conflict will be updated in school text books as on ongoing conflict with both names added together till there is a final decision made. This represents unit 4 as a conflict between a government over a political boundary. 

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unit 7: cities

unit 7: cities | Scoop.it project | Scoop.it
More than 8 million people are crowded together to live in New York City. What makes it possible? In part, it’s the city’s great public spaces — from tiny pocket parks to long waterfront promenades — where people can stroll and play. Amanda Burden helped plan some of the city’s newest public spaces, drawing on her experience as, surprisingly, an animal behaviorist. She shares the unexpected challenges of planning parks people love -- and why it's important.
Lauren Sellers's insight:

Cities are meant for people. What makes a cities is what draws people into living there. Public spaces attracts people by the way others interact with others, the environment, the economy, comfort, greenery, ect. This video clip explains why cities are made and what kind of people need to occupy a city to make is great. This video impacts unit 7 because of the topic of cities.

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Unit 7: urban land use

Unit 7: urban land use | Scoop.it project | Scoop.it
There should be an upper limit on the amount of land held by private owners in Scotland, a government-commissioned study recommends.
Lauren Sellers's insight:

In scotland, there has been a demand for a reconsideration from the government to look at distributing the land better. There is a lot of land for industrialization but remains as more rural. Companies want to expand on developing on the rural areas. This relates to unit 7 because of the urban land use. This is critical in Scotland to keep urban and rural an equal distribution as the country does not want to expand on too much urban areas. 

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Unit 6: Mining slump hits South African GDP

Unit 6: Mining slump hits South African GDP | Scoop.it project | Scoop.it
South Africa's economy shrank by 0.6% in the first three months of the year, the worst quarterly performance in five years, official data shows.
Lauren Sellers's insight:

South Africa's mining industry has been shaken by labor unrest. Platinum miners strike has lasted for five months. The unrest has taken a toll on South Africa's economy as it shrank by 0.6 percent in the most recent quarter.

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Unit 5: How cities can embrace urban agriculture and weaken the grip of 'big food'

Unit 5: How cities can embrace urban agriculture and weaken the grip of 'big food' | Scoop.it project | Scoop.it
Many city governments around the world are encouraging agriculture in urban areas--so long as it stays small scale and doesn't challenge the status quo. Mike Duff argues that cities must learn to embrace 'urban ag' social movements as a way to engage citizens in shaping their own cities, and encourage these movements to scale up to reduce the power of 'big food' businesses to subvert planning processes. The key challenge will be regulation--cities should create a new land use designation entitled 'urban agricultural use' to accommodate a healthy balance between urban lifestyles and urban farming.
Lauren Sellers's insight:

According to the article agricultural operations in urban areas can begin to rival the current agricultural system. Urban agriculture can benefit from access to compost and low transportation costs. Regulating urban farms may pose a challenge for city officials.

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Unit 4: Colonialism

Unit 4: Colonialism | Scoop.it project | Scoop.it
President's decision to shift official language from English to local language comes months after its decision to withdraw from the Commonwealth

Via Seth Dixon
Lauren Sellers's insight:

culturally it would be a good idea to switch the official language to a local language that way their langueages dont become dead languages but economically its not a good idea because Americas dominate language is English and it is also an economic power.

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Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 2:27 PM

I think it's great that the President of Gambia wants to change the official language from English to the local language. The West African country announced it is withdrawing from the Commonwealth which is a group of 54 nations which made up largely of former British colonies, hence why these colonies speak English. If the people want aren't using English primarily and they're using another language, that is rooted to the culture of Gambia, then maybe it's time to consider having two official languages.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 3:49 PM

Gambian president wants his nation to have a sense of identity. Conforming to the English language and making that the primary language of the country has set a drawback on what he wants his country to be. He says they should speak their local language and that to be a leader you don't have to speak English. I think speaking the local language is a great idea but also knowing the English language is very beneficial.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 3, 1:25 PM

Gambia does not want the English language to be the official language that is spoken anymore.  Noting that it reflects the UK and they don't believe that they and the UK have much in common especially on the platform of human rights.  Cutting the English language as the official language continues to cut ties with the UK.  One of the problems with this is if there are multiple local languages spoken in Gambia which one are they going to choose as the official language.  With this more problems are presented, those that do not know the local language that is chosen to be official will have to learn the new language quickly if they want to have any idea as to what is going on in their own country.

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Unit 5: Exclusive: Deadly pig virus re-infects U.S. farm, fuels supply fears

Unit 5: Exclusive: Deadly pig virus re-infects U.S. farm, fuels supply fears | Scoop.it project | Scoop.it
CHICAGO (Reuters) - An Indiana farm has become the first to confirm publicly it suffered a second outbreak of a deadly pig virus, fueling concerns that a disease that has wiped out 10 percent of the U.S.
Lauren Sellers's insight:

Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea virus has reappeared in an Indiana farm. The virus, which poses no threat to human health, killed roughly 7 million pigs in 2013. The effected farms were thought to have gained immunity to the virus but this resurgence discredits the idea. The virus may be much harder to contain than originally thought. The virus has greatly affected pork prices.

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Unit 3: Gender

Unit 3: Gender | Scoop.it project | Scoop.it

The complete global map of laws governing abortion and birth control.


Via Seth Dixon
Lauren Sellers's insight:

i noticed Africa is really against abortion and thats probably do to the lack of medical care that can be provided by the country. Most contries are ok with birth control. I also learned from these maps that condoms are actually free in some countries and in others not even available for purchase.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 3, 2013 8:11 PM

This series of maps shows the cultural and legal differences around the world that impact access to abortion and birth control.

Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 21, 2013 5:18 PM

Another example of how the United States allows their citizens freedom to make a choice. Americans are allowed to choose contraception types, take birth control and get an abortion if they want to. Some countries only allow abortions if a child is conceived by rape. And then there are countries like El Salvador where an abortion is illegal and no one is permitted to get one under any circumstance. It is interesting to see all the different countries and their legal beliefs on these matters, and how it varies from state to state in the U.S. It gives the reader a little insight into the cultual and legal beliefs of the countries shown. 

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Unit 3: Gender

Unit 3: Gender | Scoop.it project | Scoop.it
I used to think that street harassment was so entrenched in our culture and unchangeable. All I could do to address it was to cope - walk fast; avoid eye contact; pretend to be on the phone. But I got tired of feeling powerless and decided to respond to it and change the culture that allows it to continue.

Via Seth Dixon
Lauren Sellers's insight:

Like how this can relate to the popular hashtag that started a few days ago: #YesAllWomen, which stands up for women and brings attention to the problems involving rape culture and how women should change their appearance and actions in order to feel safer in a society. Women shouldnt have to live in fear every day. I like that the hashtag doesnt target every man because of course not every man is a rapist but it does target rapists and focuses on the fact that all women have or will feel harrassed by a man sometime in their life and that the reason behind the hashtag.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 25, 8:14 PM

People experience place and public spaces in very distinct ways--gender plays a crucial role in how we socially navigate in and through space.  This article about how women can address street harassment goes well with this additional article that tackles the problems with a society that normalizes street harassment


Tagsspace, gender, place.

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Unit 5: Portland wins federal manufacturing designation for food and agriculture | The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram

Unit 5: Portland wins federal manufacturing designation for food and agriculture | The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram | Scoop.it project | Scoop.it
It is one of 12 to get federal support seen as a potential ‘game changer’ for local food and agriculture.
Lauren Sellers's insight:

Portland Maine will be designated as a manufacturing center for its role in producing local food. This designation, not typical for agriculture, will help Portland be more competitive when applying for grants. Portland plans to cut down on wasted food, increase home-based food production.

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Unit 4: War and Terrorism

Unit 4: War and Terrorism | Scoop.it project | Scoop.it

The resources tab of the National Council for Social Studies (NCSS) webpage is a treasure trove of lesson plan materials for teachers. This particular link focuses on War and Terrorism, and provides resources to help teachers to educate their classes about the emerging geopolitical landscape. This is a set of over 30 lesson plans, articles, maps and resources that focus on the U.S. war in Iraq, terrorism, and other military incursions in the Middle East. Collectively they give geographic perspective on current events so students can understand more about the places in the world that they hear about in the news.


Via Seth Dixon
Lauren Sellers's insight:

Before 9/11 a lot of Americans didnt know much about the war on terrorism, It wasnt till after the attacks when they were directly affected did they bother to learn more about it to know why it happened and if something like it would happen again. 

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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 4:24 PM

This must be a great teaching plan so students can be thought about what is going on in the world. It also shows them what is going on in Iraq and in the Middle East and it could probably trigger one of them to fight back and change the Middle East from all the discrimination towards women and probably destroy all these bad groups that just have a motive to destroy and kill.

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Unit 4: Gerrymandering

Unit 4: Gerrymandering | Scoop.it project | Scoop.it
A brief overview of crimes against geography in the 113th Congress.

Via Seth Dixon
Lauren Sellers's insight:

This concept is used to favor certain political parties in certain areas. There are rules like the ditrict has to be all connected but they can manipulate the redrawing to make it that a certain party still wins that district.

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Kampe Kyle's curator insight, May 28, 10:01 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the concept of gerrymandering, which is the practice of creating certain political boundaries in order to favor a certain political party and its representative.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:29 PM

A showing of the gerrymandering districts of the most absurd kind.

Gerrymandering bases itself off the place of the districts in an attempt to sway voting in favor of one party or another or even for the most equal by dealing with similar human characteristics.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 30, 3:15 PM

unit 4

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unit 4: political geography

unit 4: political geography | Scoop.it project | Scoop.it
Former cricketer turned politician Imran Khan, today said that the Indian army would fail in Kashmir just as the Americans had failed in Afghanistan.
Lauren Sellers's insight:

Politician Imran Khan stands up with a massive group of protesters in India to give valid points that India cannot do a just job of reenforcing power to the people just as America canning in Afghanistan. He says that India needs to withdraw from the war in Kashmir. This is a unit of political geography because it points out the political differences between countries. 

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unit 7: economic development

unit 7: economic development | Scoop.it project | Scoop.it
President Obama’s visit to the SUNY “NanoCollege” in Albany this week highlighted a rare New York economic bright spot. “Right now, some of the most advanced manufacturing work in America is being ...
Lauren Sellers's insight:

In this article says there has been a discovery of natural gas in the US. This can spark the economy in the US by being able to inport and export natural gas. As someone quotes from the NY post “potential re-industrialization of the US economy” can boost our economy because there is an abundant supply and its cheap. This article relates because the topic is covered of the economy being boosted in the US. This is a great opportunity for the US the raise our own economy instead of relying on other countries imports. 

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unit 7: economic development

unit 7: economic development | Scoop.it project | Scoop.it
India’s problems have deep and stubborn origins of the country’s own making.
Lauren Sellers's insight:

This article discusses the problems India is encountering with the economy. At first India was at its peak in terms of economy but took a toll when prices began to rise. Now this country is in a crisis with trying to make ends meet. This is directed to unit 7 because of how the economy is being inspected. India relies of skilled labors instead of cheap workers. India is now hitting rock bottom because money is running out to pay for these skilled workers that are going else where for work. 

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Unit 7: industrialization

Unit 7: industrialization | Scoop.it project | Scoop.it
Firefighters remain at the scene of a blaze on an industrial park in Flintshire.
Lauren Sellers's insight:

Because of this industrial park on fire, there was a direct impact on the pollution put in the air. FIre fighters were on the sceen to try to put the fire out. This article directly coorilates to our AP HUG unit 7 because of what industrilization has done to our nation. Although it has had a positivie impact, there is also negative. If more industrial parks were to catch on fire like this, there will be a substantial amount of pollution put in the air that will put health risks for human and animals.

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Unit 6: Japan retail sales fall on tax hike

Unit 6: Japan retail sales fall on tax hike | Scoop.it project | Scoop.it
Retail sales in Japan fall 4.4% in April, compared with the same period last year, as the country's sales tax hike begins to take effect.
Lauren Sellers's insight:

Japan raises sales tax in part to keep up with the growing need to provide services for a graying population. Japan is currently dealing with deflation which causes consumers to hold off on consumption for lower prices in the future. Putting an end to deflation is necessary to improving Japans economy.

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Unit 5: The Idaho family farm endures — for now | Agriculture | Idahostatesman.com

Unit 5: The Idaho family farm endures — for now | Agriculture | Idahostatesman.com | Scoop.it project | Scoop.it
According to the latest U.S. Department of Agriculture census, the family- or farmer-owned operation is still king in Idaho, making up 83.5 percent of all farms in the state. But that's down from a peak of 88.1 percent 10 years earlier and the lowest since at least 1997.
Lauren Sellers's insight:

Mid-size farms are on the decline as small local farms as well large corporate farms increase in number. Farm size is becoming more polarized. Large farms thrive due to their efficiency. Small farms thrive due to the niche they have created.

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Unit 4: Borders

Unit 4: Borders | Scoop.it project | Scoop.it

"Brazil (top) and Bolivia (bottom)."


Via Seth Dixon
Lauren Sellers's insight:

Photographs show how different countries can be even by just the border. Number 3 really stuck out to me that Haiti doesnt have as many regulation reguarding deforestation as the Dominican Republic and its very noticable.

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, May 6, 7:49 PM

Borders can tell us a great feel about the relationship beween the two  nations.

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 22, 12:52 PM

The concept of a political boundary has been developed over many many years into an unbreakable line between two different sets of people with different ideologies, religions, and government styles. The boundary extends into the ground, into the air, and includes any resources within the boundary. These pictures show the different shapes and various lines between countries, and displays the intricacies of boundaries in the world.  

Kampe Kyle's curator insight, May 28, 10:21 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the concept of land use patterns. As certain countries practice deforestation, slash-and-burn and other land use types, bordering countries may take a completely indifferent approach to the land and thus create a contrast.

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Unit 4: Territorialism

Unit 4: Territorialism | Scoop.it project | Scoop.it
We chart the routes of, and reasons for, the barriers which are once again dividing populations

Via Seth Dixon
Lauren Sellers's insight:

We looked at this map in class its really interesting nd weird to see all the dividing walls in the world and to discover ones youve never seen before.

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Caterin Victor's curator insight, January 9, 4:00 AM

 Unfortunately,  for our    security, we  must  live  in a Walled World

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 14, 9:48 PM

It appears India is constructing a 2,500-mile long fence around its neighboring country Bangladesh. The barbed wire fence may have been built due to that fact India has one of the largest populations in the world and they do not want the struggling people of Bangladesh to enter their country. Also, areas around the fence are becoming dangerous, with more than 1,000 people killed by border patrol and criminals. There are not many jobs in Bangladesh and the people are having trouble finding clean drinkable water. Lastly, the people may be fleeing into India hoping to find work and an improved lifestyle.  

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 6:51 PM

Walls are a symbol of political boundaries and motives, usually intended to keep certain people in or out. This website in particular clearly highlights this idea in human geography as it explores the various walls that mark our landscape and thus contribute to changing policies and borders. Walls can also affect the landscape, not just mark it, as an effect of asserting either political dominance or border policies, as best seen by the resulting environmental results that come from it and the displacement of people (as seen on Palestinian-Israeli border). 

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Unit 5: Ukraine Faces Hurdles in Restoring Its Farming Legacy

Unit 5: Ukraine Faces Hurdles in Restoring Its Farming Legacy | Scoop.it project | Scoop.it
Once the breadbasket of the Soviet Union, the country is looking to agricultural production to help fix its economy and reduce its dependence on Russia.
Lauren Sellers's insight:

The Ukraine is using its land inefficiently compared to its Soviet past. Land regulations are cumbersome and outdated deterring investment. Some land sits idle as it is not profitable to grow on or the owner has passed away and the land has not exchanged hands. Ukraine needs to undergo serious structural changes to attract the investment needed to once again become an agricultural powerhouse. 

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Unit 3: Cultural Regions

Unit 3: Cultural Regions | Scoop.it project | Scoop.it

"A state commission working on a much-discussed report titled 'Foundations of State Cultural Politics' will release their findings in two weeks, presidential advisor Vladimir Tolstoi announced last week, adding that the basic formula of the report could be summarized as 'Russia is not Europe.'"


Via Seth Dixon
Lauren Sellers's insight:

Russia is usually associated with Europe but not Western Europe but there is a push to separate Russia from Europe.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 8, 10:17 PM

At times Russia has sought to be perceived as a part of Europe only to be excluded in the minds (and institutions) of Western Europe.  Now, in a discursive way to protect itself, it is reaffirming and building a cultural buffer zone between Europe and Russia.  What are the borders of Europe as you think of it?  Can world regions change over time?  Any examples of regions having their borders redrawn?  


Tags: RussiaEurope, regions.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 12:01 PM

Russia is part of Europe, regardless any different ideology or whatever. 

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 5, 2:46 PM

In a clear connection to the recent increase of Russian aggression throughout Eastern Europe, Russia has seen it necessary to proclaim their distinct separation from Europe. It is no wonder Russian nationalism has been increasing and spreading, as they see themselves as the defining culture of the region. This clear separation between Europe and Russia, and the view of Russian as the dominant culture in the region adds more context to the current situation of Russian intervention in Ukraine.