Human Geography
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See More, Eat More: The Geography Of Fast Food

See More, Eat More: The Geography Of Fast Food | Human Geography | Scoop.it
“The more fast food you encounter where you live and work, the likelier you are to be obese, research shows. That suggests policies limiting fast-food outlets in neighborhoods may be onto something.”
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Mapping the U.S. Olympic team state-by-state

Mapping the U.S. Olympic team state-by-state | Human Geography | Scoop.it
“California will send the most athletes to the Winter Games, followed closely by Colorado and Minnesota.”
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40 more maps that explain the world

40 more maps that explain the world | Human Geography | Scoop.it
I've searched wide and far for maps that can reveal and surprise and inform in ways that the daily headlines might not.

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List of countries by percentage of population suffering from undernourishment - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

List of countries by percentage of population suffering from undernourishment

This is a list of countries by percentage of population suffering from undernourishment , as defined by the United Nations World Food Programme and the UN Food and Agriculture Organization in its "The State of Food Insecurity in the World" 2009 report.

Countries by percentage of population suffering from undernourishment

Source:http://t.co/ktOoiy9eYc
- http://t.co/wjOfZEQ8RU
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Does Geography Influence How a Language Sounds?

Does Geography Influence How a Language Sounds? | Human Geography | Scoop.it
A new study is the first to show that language can be influenced by geography. (RT @AmityComms: Does geography influence how a #language sounds?
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Meet the world’s other 25 royal families

Meet the world’s other 25 royal families | Human Geography | Scoop.it
There are emirs, sultans, elected monarchs and even a grand duchy, but their powers vary widely.
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A revealing map of the world’s most and least ethnically diverse countries

A revealing map of the world’s most and least ethnically diverse countries | Human Geography | Scoop.it
According to a landmark 2002 study, diversity correlated with lower GDP, worse governance and, interestingly, equatorial latitude.
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The Secret, Contentious History of Maps - Daily Beast

The Secret, Contentious History of Maps - Daily Beast | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The Secret, Contentious History of Maps
Daily Beast
Published in 1973, Peters's map was a sensation, embraced by the United Nations and the National Geographic Society and distributed all over the world.
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Most Americans live in Purple America, not Red or Blue America

Most Americans live in Purple America, not Red or Blue America | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"We're far less politically divided by geography than it may seem....Of course, it’s true that Americans aren’t of one mind on many political issues.  But it is important that we not look at these maps and infer that we are so politically polarized by geography.  In fact, most Americans live in places that are at least somewhat politically and ideologically diverse — even if that’s not reflected in how congressional district boundaries are drawn.   In terms of the most important driver of political choices — partisanship — most of us live in a purple America, not a red or blue America."


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Chamath Gunawardena's curator insight, December 15, 2013 5:06 PM

I like this article because it shows that the preference of a political party doesn't divide america completely so that that some states are completely republican or completely democratic. Showing that america isn't as politically divided in certain areas means we can view other's views in those areas as a unique view.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 16, 2014 2:01 PM

Americans are entitled to their own beliefs. If they want to be a democrat thats fine. If they want to be a republican thats fine too. Back in the day, this map may have looked different and more on the red and blue sides than purple, but in todays world people have changed. They are not entitled to be a democrat just because they live in a democratic society. People live in areas of purple (more so than just red or just blue), not red or blue and the purple color gives Americans a chance to think for themselves.

Gabby Watkins's curator insight, May 13, 2014 7:50 PM

Unit 5

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Most Populous Countries in 2100

Most Populous Countries in 2100 | Human Geography | Scoop.it
“A listing of the twenty most populous countries in the year 2100, based on United Nations population projections for 2100. This list is from the About.com Geography GuideSite.”
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Teaching the Sochi Olympics | History, Geography and Social Studies - New York Times (blog)

Teaching the Sochi Olympics | History, Geography and Social Studies - New York Times (blog) | Human Geography | Scoop.it
“New York Times (blog) Teaching the Sochi Olympics | History, Geography and Social Studies New York Times (blog) With all those triple corks and twizzles, it's easy to get lost in the athletic brilliance we see on our TV screens.”
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Why Geography Education Matters

Why Geography Education Matters | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"This blog-a-thon submission comes from Joseph Kerski of the National Council of Geographic Education (2011 President). Joseph writes about why geography education matters and how it applies to each one of us."

 

 

This was one great orange! Thank you GS!


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austin tydings's comment, August 27, 2013 2:41 PM
Geography, is a subject where it takes all the skills from science, math, English, and social studies, and combines it into a in depth thinking class. It makes you find the problem, fix it and tell how and why you fixed it . For example, a crop is not growing in a dry area, then you try it in a wet area and it grows, now you have to find out why it grows in a wet area and not a dry area and explain why. It is good to start out early learning about the basics in the core classes then later in the more advance classes, to understand how to fix a problem.
Annenkov's curator insight, September 13, 2013 2:09 AM

"Geography education applies to each one of us" - not only for children, but for adults in everyday life. Who is interested in developing a personal geoculture?  

Peter Phillips's curator insight, October 5, 2013 7:37 PM

Using an orange to learn the continents of the Earth :) great idea. 

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Current Worldwide Homicide/Murder Rate

Current Worldwide Homicide/Murder Rate | Human Geography | Scoop.it
This map shows homicide or murder rates per 100,000 population around the world. Homicide is defined as unlawful death purposefully inflicted on a person by another person.
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40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World - A Sheep No More

40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World - A Sheep No More | Human Geography | Scoop.it
If you’re a visual learner like myself, then you know maps, charts and info graphics can really help bring data and information to life. Maps can make a point resonate with readers and this collection...
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I could not stop looking at this site!!

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Population by Latitude/Longitude | Geography Ed...

Population by Latitude/Longitude | Geography Ed... | Human Geography | Scoop.it
This is an excellent spatial graph that helps to explain the distribution of the human population. Why do we live where we live? The longitude map is still fascinating, but has less explanatory power.
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Is the World Empty? Or Overcrowded? It's Both

Is the World Empty? Or Overcrowded? It's Both | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"For city dwellers, it may seem like the world is packed full with people. But not everywhere is so densely populated; in fact, many places in the world are seemingly void of life.There are over 7 billion people on the planet, a massive number that paints an image of human life sprawling densely over the planet...humans are unevenly distributed across the planet, leaving some areas that are densely populated and others that are largely void of life."

For city dwellers, it may seem like the world is packed full with people. But not everywhere is so densely populated; in fact, many places in the world are seemingly void of life. The map to the right shows the highs and lows of the world’s population density: the darker areas denote more people, while the lighter areas denote less. - See more at: http://storymaps.esri.com/stories/2013/full-and-empty/#sthash.KkslkIgM.dpuf

For city dwellers, it may seem like the world is packed full with people. But not everywhere is so densely populated; in fact, many places in the world are seemingly void of life. The map to the right shows the highs and lows of the world’s population density: the darker areas denote more people, while the lighter areas denote less.

For city dwellers, it may seem like the world is packed full with people. But not everywhere is so densely populated; in fact, many places in the world are seemingly void of life. The map to the right shows the highs and lows of the world’s population density: the darker areas denote more people, while the lighter areas denote less. - See more at: http://storymaps.esri.com/stories/2013/full-and-empty/#sthash.KkslkIgM.dpufFor city dwellers, it may seem like the world is packed full with people. But not everywhere is so densely populated; in fact, many places in the world are seemingly void of life. The map to the right shows the highs and lows of the world’s population density: the darker areas denote more people, while the lighter areas denote less. - See more at: http://storymaps.esri.com/stories/2013/full-and-empty/#sthash.KkslkIgM.dpufFor city dwellers, it may seem like the world is packed full with people. But not everywhere is so densely populated; in fact, many places in the world are seemingly void of life. The map to the right shows the highs and lows of the world’s population density: the darker areas denote more people, while the lighter areas denote less. - See more at: http://storymaps.esri.com/stories/2013/full-and-empty/#sthash.KkslkIgM.dpufFor city dwellers, it may seem like the world is packed full with people. But not everywhere is so densely populated; in fact, many places in the world are seemingly void of life. The map to the right shows the highs and lows of the world’s population density: the darker areas denote more people, while the lighter areas denote less. - See more at: http://storymaps.esri.com/stories/2013/full-and-empty/#sthash.KkslkIgM.dpufFor city dwellers, it may seem like the world is packed full with people. But not everywhere is so densely populated; in fact, many places in the world are seemingly void of life. The map to the right shows the highs and lows of the world’s population density: the darker areas denote more people, while the lighter areas denote less. - See more at: http://storymaps.esri.com/stories/2013/full-and-empty/#sthash.KkslkIgM.dpuf
Via Seth Dixon
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Great interactive map!!

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Samantha Tovias's curator insight, January 13, 2014 2:39 AM

What this article states is that in some places of the world it's crowded with a lot of people and there's not much space. People struggle to find places to live without being really close to ones neighbor. They also have to struggle over  job opportunities. Due to this they struggle with poverty and the places they are at aren't so clean. This is because people make a lot of trash and where there's many people there is a lot of trash. Therefore it's not so sanitary and they have to deal with lack of space and sanitation.

 

On the other hand, in some places of the world, there is much space to be inhabited by humans. But it's basically free land because no one lives there and there's no building occupying it. But this land could be used for many things such as building neighbor hoods, buildings, and business. Sometimes it's good to have that land free from everything because that way when there's really a reason to use it we can just go back to it with no worrys. Just as long as we don't use up too much land it should be fine. We also need to know how to control how much nature we use up. Because its also not healthy to have a lot of pollution with no trees to cleanse our oxygen. That's a hazardous precaution us humans should take.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, January 13, 2014 6:30 PM

The most amazing conversation I had in Jamaica was with a musician who had traveled the world as I have. He worried about the crowding in Asia. We talked about the uneven distribution of space. I like peering down from a plane while traveling over the west ( in America) lots of white spaces on the map.

Christian Madison's curator insight, January 13, 2014 7:18 PM

Well some places, such as deserts, are really hot, dry, barren and devoid of life; mostly because it's impossible to build anything on such soft ground. While places such as Texas has really dry and hard ground perfect for building foundations.  Then there's the amount of resources in that area, I.e. Water, food, tree, etc.,  and many other factors that contradict if it's inhabitable.

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Who Owns the Arctic

Who Owns the Arctic | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Territorial claims of countries in the Arctic are being spurred by the presence of large caches of oil and natural gas, melting ice and dwindling energy reserves in other regions. ("Who owns the Arctic?
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