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France's First Free-Speech Challenge After Charlie Hebdo

France's First Free-Speech Challenge After Charlie Hebdo | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Even before last week's horrific events, the relative complexity of free speech in France could be encapsulated by Dieudonné M’bala M’bala⎯a political comedian or practitioner of hate speech, depending on your take.
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Without mental maps, we’re lost

Without mental maps, we’re lost | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Elwood was a senior geographer working on the ground-floor of the very global positioning systems (GPS) and geographic information systems (GIS) he will throw up for discussion in his TEDx talk.

His question: Are we surrendering our innate mental map making abilities to technology and relying on and trusting it too much? And for TEDx audiences only, he’ll toss out ideas on ways to prevent that from happening.

 

Tags: mapping, GPS, cartography, TED, 201.


Via Seth Dixon
Jeff Cherry's insight:

The mind is a terrible thing to waste.

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Chris Carter's curator insight, January 5, 7:35 PM

I had the pleasure to participate in Dr. Judy Willis'
(neuroscientist/MS teacher) ( RADTeach.com) keynote address at 21st Century learning in Hong Kong last month, and was further blessed to interview her for my Ed Tech podcast. A point she made that has stuck with me is that graphic organizers/mental maps are like having a second brain. Why would we not take advantage of them?

Wyatt Fratnz's curator insight, March 18, 8:08 PM

This text tells about a geographer who exaggerates today's modern dependency of Global Positioning Systems and Mapping, and the importance of still developing a mental map. It is important because lack of reliance of our mental maps leads to a primal fear and increasing instances of the feeling of being lost. The challenge is presented of how we stimulate technology in our mental maps. 

 

This article describes technological and mental process of mapping and how we should use it in our everyday lives. This is important because it gives humans a sense of direction and tells us how to keep it.

Carlee Allen's curator insight, March 26, 6:20 PM

This is an article that explains and adds on to the fact that we Americans have begun too reliant on technology. Keith explains how kids now a days don't have a geographical sense and how it is really going to hurt them in the future.

 

I thought that this article was interesting, because it is a pretty controversial topic and very relatable.

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Here's The Most Educated Town In Every State

Here's The Most Educated Town In Every State | Human Geography | Scoop.it
A map showing the towns with the highest number of college graduates in each state.

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Jeff Cherry's insight:

Very interesting!

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Emily Bian's curator insight, September 28, 2014 8:43 PM

Although this map is specific to a city in each state, and not a state as a whole, I still think this map is really interesting. For example, Maryland has the highest percentage of 92.7%, while Texas has a pretty high number of 86.3%. The only place I wouldn't go is North Dakota, with their whooping number of 39%. This is a thematic map, telling us a story of the highest number of college graduates in each state. 

           This is an interesting map, because many people are interested in their own country. Since I live in Texas, it's interesting to see the stats of our state. This will help students get a feel for these data maps and know the most educated states. 

2) Geographical analysis of population

Carlee Allen's curator insight, March 22, 2:52 PM

This is a map with an article that shows and talks about the most affluent cities in each U.S. state. The map uses information from the annual U.S. Census Bureau survey to count the highest number of college graduates in each city. Most of the educated towns were suburbs of big cities.

 

I thought that this map was very interesting to look at just because I mainly didn't recognize the cities that were said to be the most "affluent". This explains why the most affluent cities were said to be found outside the well-known bigger cities as suburbs.

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Kentucky Teacher Resigns Over Parents’ Dumb Ebola Fears

Kentucky Teacher Resigns Over Parents’ Dumb Ebola Fears | Human Geography | Scoop.it
A teacher at St. Margaret Mary Catholic School in Louisville, Kentucky, who recently returned from a medical mission trip to Africa has resigned rather than submitting to a paid 21-day leave and producing a doctor's note that says she is in good health. The school's request was a reaction to "strong parent concerns" about Susan Sherman exposing students to Ebola — though she was in Kenya, which is separated from the Ebola outbreak by at least five countries.

Via Seth Dixon
Jeff Cherry's insight:

This is typical of America's sad ignorance of geography.  Clearly we need to continue to teach locational geography.  I'd suggest we start with the media!

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 4, 2014 6:43 PM

These are the things that make teachers want to retire...but someone has to fight against this great ignorance. Individual ignorance is just fine; not everyone needs to be incredibly educated to have my respect and admiration. But when you couple ignorance with arrogance, well, that's another story.

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150 Years Ago, Sochi Was the Site of a Horrific Ethnic Cleansing

150 Years Ago, Sochi Was the Site of a Horrific Ethnic Cleansing | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Czar Alexander II may have freed the serfs, but his war against the stateless people of the Caucasus cannot be ignored

 

The czar’s approval of this rapid expulsion of hundreds of thousands of Circassians to the Ottoman Empire resulted in an ethnic cleansing through disease and drowning as overcrowded ferries crossed the Black Sea. The Ottomans were unprepared for the influx of refugees, and the absence of adequate shelter caused even more deaths from exposure. Those Circassians who attempted to remain in the Russian Empire and fight for their land were massacred. Sochi’s “Red Hill,” where the skiing and snowboarding events will take place during these Olympic Games, was the site of the Circassian last stand, where the Imperial Russian armies celebrated their “victory” over the local defenders.


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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 2014 9:13 AM

It is interesting to learn the history of a place that most American’s didn’t know existed until the Olympics.  It is always helpful to have things placed in a historic perspective.  The historic background makes understanding modern day events easier

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 30, 2014 8:33 PM

This is basically like a mini Holocaust. When do people think its okay to do something like this? It boggles my mind how things like this can actually go on in the world still with todays technologies and armed forces. 

Bob Beaven's curator insight, March 5, 2:27 PM

This article shows the great deal of overlap between Geography and History.  Today, when people think of Sochi, they will remember the Olympic games, and the epic hockey battle between the USA and the Russian Federation.  Yet, as this article discusses, Sochi was once the sight of a military battle, and a massacre.  The Russian Empire under Alexander II wanted to expand its borders to be well defined and would wage war against the Circassians who lived in the region.  When they would not go to the Ottoman Empire, and fought the Russians, the army and the Czar were prepared to fight them.  As a result, on Red Hill, the native people had a last stand against the Russian Army and were massacred.  Yet, the southern region of Russia near the middleast, to this day, is not secure.  The history of this region has guaranteed that the people living in these regions of the country would come to loathe Russia.  In fact, this area in the form of Chechnya, has exported the hatred and Islamic fervor of the region, to the United States in the Boston Marathon Bombings of 2013.  History and Geography are not neat boxes that are separate from each other, they are always influencing one another in all actuality. 

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"Natural" Foods?

"The False Advertising Industry reveals the shocking truth about what is allowed in 'Natural' food. Only the USDA Organic Seal guarantees your food contains no Genetically Modified Organisms, no toxic pesticides, and no growth hormones or antibiotics."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 6, 2014 3:22 PM

This funny video shows how meaningless the word "natural" is when it is only used as a buzzword or slogan.  Many food companies are trying to show their "natural" roots these days--some with a new label and others are trying to legitimately clean up their production line.  In fact, McDonald's has gone to great lengths to show their costumers where the food is coming from and to personalize the food producers to alleviate their fears.  They have created a Track my Maccas iPhone App which used several geospatial technologies to explore the commodity chain of McDonalds items (keep in mind that this is the companies own promotional tool). 


Tags: agriculture, GMOs, food production, mapping, geospatial.

Katie's curator insight, March 24, 12:54 AM

This article is about the false advertising of food. I think when you buy a food that it should have a label saying it includes GMOs just so you are aware. This has to do with the Green Revolution, because thats when GMOs were created.

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Top 10 Unusual Borders - Listverse

Top 10 Unusual Borders - Listverse | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Most of the time, a border is an imaginary line that isn’t remarkable in any way, usually not even readily visible.

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Global National - The true cost of cheap clothing

Tue, Nov 27: Following Saturday's deadly garment factory fire in Bangladesh, some wonder if greed is being put before safety? Robin Stickley reports. For mor...

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Forget Golf Courses: Subdivisions Draw Residents With Farms

Forget Golf Courses: Subdivisions Draw Residents With Farms | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Across the country, home buyers are embracing subdivisions that make farms a central amenity.

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Natalie K Jensen's curator insight, December 17, 2013 10:03 AM

Part of Assingment 1 on the Ecological Footprint.  This is a great item on how Americans are changing their daily lives to be more environmentally friendly.  Would you like a farm in your subdivision? 

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Is Buddhism the Most Science-Friendly Religion? - Scientific American (blog)

Is Buddhism the Most Science-Friendly Religion? - Scientific American (blog) | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Scientific American (blog)
Is Buddhism the Most Science-Friendly Religion?
Scientific American (blog)
What in Darwin's name is going on?
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Drought Helped Spark Syria's Civil War -- Is it One of Many Climate Wars to Come? | BillMoyers.com

Drought Helped Spark Syria's Civil War -- Is it One of Many Climate Wars to Come? | BillMoyers.com | Human Geography | Scoop.it

Climate change is already hurting the world’s most vulnerable populations. Those who live in areas hit hard by drought, severe storms or rising seas and can’t relocate because of economic or social factors bear the brunt of our planet’s increasing volatility.


One way the changing climate has already made itself known is through a devastating drought — and ensuing food shortage — in Syria; it created a powder keg, and played a significant role in sparking the country’s civil war. We can expect to see similar scenarios unfold in the future.


Moyers & Company’s John Light spoke with Francesco Femia, co-founder of the Center for Climate and Security — a think tank with an advisory board consisting of retired military commanders and international affairs experts — about how climate change serves as a “threat multiplier” in volatile regions such as Syria, Egypt and Pakistan, and what America’s role should be in a world in which climate change increasingly exacerbates — and causes — international crises.


Click headline to read the interview--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Geography is EVERYTHING!

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Christian South Sudan: Headed for civil war - WorldNetDaily

Christian South Sudan: Headed for civil war - WorldNetDaily | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Michael Carl is a veteran journalist with overseas military experience and experience as a political consultant. He also has two Master's Degrees, is a bi-vocational pastor and lives with his family in the Northeast United States.
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Quebec charter aims to put religion under wraps

Quebec charter aims to put religion under wraps | Human Geography | Scoop.it
By Denyse O'Leary. Some observers see restrictions on religious symbols for public workers as a way for the province to bolster separation claims (RT @OSV: Quebec charter aims to put religion under wraps
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Kim Jong-Un considers opening restaurant in Scotland selling North Korean ... - Daily Mail

Kim Jong-Un considers opening restaurant in Scotland selling North Korean ... - Daily Mail | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The North Korean leader, who already has a chain of restaurants called Pyongyang is reportedly eager to open up a branch in the UK, with experts saying he is especially keen on Scotland.
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Kimchi haggis! Really?

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Inside The Indiana Megadairy Making Coca-Cola's New Milk

Inside The Indiana Megadairy Making Coca-Cola's New Milk | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Coca-Cola got a lot of attention in November when it announced it was going into the milk business. In fact, its extra-nutritious milk product was invented by some dairy farmers in Indiana.

Via Seth Dixon
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This operation is in Indiana where I'm from.  Farming is big time here!

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, January 23, 12:25 PM

unit 5

Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 2, 5:11 PM

As the main producer of certain crops and hogs, the state of Indiana has been chosen by Coca-Cola to spearhead a new innovative project regarding an improved flavor of milk in the future. Indiana’s prime location and abundance of raw materials positively contributed to the decision to establish the project’s headquarters in this state. As a result, it is expected that this innovation will boost Indiana’s economy and create for jobs and advancements in technology. This project allows Coca-Cola the opportunity to expand its brand and offer healthier beverage options to the consumer.

Katie's curator insight, March 23, 11:34 PM

This article is about how coco cola is going into the milk business. There source for milk is from Fair Oaks Farm. This dairy is Americas one and only dairy theme park. I think this would be an example of large scale commercial agriculture and agribusiness.  

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NCAA Fan Map: How the Country Roots for College Football

NCAA Fan Map: How the Country Roots for College Football | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Data based on Facebook 'likes' estimates the boundaries of college football fandom.

Via Seth Dixon
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Though a cool map it doesn't take into account the diaspora of fans around the country.  Living here in Houston I certainly see fans from every part of the country in which people once lived. 

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Matt Green's curator insight, October 16, 2014 11:16 AM

I could look at this for hours. Interesting to see what college football teams the country roots for.

 

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9 Reasons the U.S. Ended Up So Much More Car-Dependent Than Europe

9 Reasons the U.S. Ended Up So Much More Car-Dependent Than Europe | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Understanding mistakes of the past can help guide U.S. transportation policy in the future.

 

In 2010, Americans drove for 85 percent of their daily trips, compared to car trip shares of 50 to 65 percent in Europe. Longer trip distances only partially explain the difference. Roughly 30 percent of daily trips are shorter than a mile on either side of the Atlantic. But of those under one-mile trips, Americans drove almost 70 percent of the time, while Europeans made 70 percent of their short trips by bicycle, foot, or public transportation.  The statistics don't reveal the sources of this disparity, but there are nine main reasons American metro areas have ended up so much more car-dependent than cities in Western Europe.


Via Seth Dixon
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The correlation to our obesity rates cannot e be ignored.

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Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 2:15 PM

Its easier for European countries to commit to cycling, walking and taking public transportation for the simple fact that their travel distance is shorter to that of the United States. A trip that can take Europeans 30 mins to travel can take Americans 45-60 mins of travel, depending where they are centrally located. I can agree with Europeans committing to using other alternatives to getting around their city versus using a car. They are more inclined to participate in physical activities, they are lowering their fuel emission, all in all, its a better decision for the environment.

Kendra King's curator insight, January 28, 7:51 PM

According to this article, “U.S. (transportation) planners” look to Europe for inspiration as the planners try to decrease Americans’ “car dependency.” Instead of giving answers about how to solve the “car dependency” issue, the author provided nine reasons for why Europeans walk and bike more. Ideas like how the European infrastructure was built (i.e their zoning laws, highways, and biking/pedestrian lanes) were discussed. I found the implication that European’s were able to walk more because residential areas and businesses were intermixed the most interesting of all these reasons. It could never really matter because most of America’s land is already developed, but it did make me remember an earlier study mentioned in the article in which 70% of Americans wouldn’t walk a mile when they could. Triggering this just made me think that intermixing our buildings wouldn’t matter because we are too lazy to walk. Some may come back with the idea that a lack of relaxed pedestrian and bike lanes prohibit this option. However, with the amount of sidewalks around, I just keep thinking it all goes back to how much we exercise (which isn’t much). So honestly, it is an unhealthy attitude that planners need to change. Meaning some drastic action would need to occur in order to actually change people’s habits.

 

 More drastic ideas like decreasing government subsidies on oil, taxing cars, and implementing policies that “shifted behavior” (i.e. no parking zones) were also explained. However with oil companies and car industries around, I don’t actually see lobbyist letting that happening in the short term. Ironically, the article mentioned that the reason U.S. planners were thinking about how to change transportation was because the model the county uses is “unstainable.” This means the transportation system cannot be maintained for either “environmental, social, or economic reasons” (see included link for definition). Thinking about these factors, I just kept coming back to oil. Environmentally it is a fixed resource, socially people want less of it due to climate change, and economically it is typically more costly. What this all means is that an alternative energy source is needed. When that eventually happens, America will probably believe the transportation system is sustainable again regardless of “urban sprawl” and lack of “public transportation.” I say this because the author pointed out how America thought itself stable during the 80’s and 90’s when energy prices were low thereby implying the bigger issue is the oil needed to change people’s behavior. 

 

Overall, the author did provide an in-depth list that made me pay attention to the cultural and government differences between America and Europe from the way space interacts with these regions.

 

*http://environment.transportation.org/environmental_issues/sustainability/#bookmarksubSustainableTransportation

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 4, 6:41 PM

 A big reason why people are more car dependant in America is because we are a lazy nation.  Americans are always looking for the easy way to accomplish things, so if you can drive a mile to work in 2 minutes or walk in 15, its almost guarenteed that the American is walking! This is obviously a general term and does not apply to all Americans but a vast majority would opt for the vehicle.  As someone who has taken several trips to Europe, people there are in far better shape than in America and i'm sure that fitness along with better eating habits attribute to that.  

Another reason I believe America is more dependant than Europe on cars is because it is far easier and cheaper to travel via train or subway in Europe.  Train stations and public transport in America are expensive and only take you to highly populated areas while the trains in Europe will take you all over the continent.

 

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Teen Spirit: Easy booze fuels youth alcoholism in Russia

Underage alcoholism in Russia is becoming widespread, as it has never been easier for teenagers to buy booze without being asked for ID. There are no stringe...

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You Don't Know Africa

You Don't Know Africa | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Find all African countries as quick as you can. It's harder than you might think.

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The Roots of Cholera in Haiti: A Lack of Trees

The Roots of Cholera in Haiti: A Lack of Trees | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Often when I read comments on stories about efforts to restore degraded land in Haiti, I see people who make accusations that environmentalists care more about plants than we do about people.

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Africa's Next Billion

Africa's Next Billion | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The World Economic Forum (WEF) is a Geneva-based non-profit organization best known for its Annual Meeting in Davos, Switzerland, the Annual Meeting of New Champions in China (Summer Davos) and the Summit on the Global Agenda in Dubai.
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Even Good Coups Are Bad - Foreign Affairs

Even Good Coups Are Bad - Foreign Affairs | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Foreign Affairs
Even Good Coups Are Bad
Foreign Affairs
Recent events in Egypt are by no means unique. In fact, they fit rather perfectly into the tradition of civil society coups, which are common in new democracies.
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Civil wars: The picture in Africa | The Economist

Civil wars: The picture in Africa | The Economist | Human Geography | Scoop.it
THE briefing in the most recent issue of The Economist's print edition tackles the tricky subject of civil wars. As anyone familiar with Africa's...
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These statistics cannot accurately determine victums of civil unrest and wars.  The longterm effect of the disruption of peoples lives is immeasurable.

 

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