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First Mayan Language Soap Opera Premieres in August in Mexico - Day News

First Mayan Language Soap Opera Premieres in August in Mexico - Day News | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The very first soap opera in the Mayan language will premiere next month in Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula. “Baktun” is a pioneer in the television industry, being the first Mayan speaking show of its kind.
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Houston to receive large share of Syrian refugees - Chron.com

Houston to receive large share of Syrian refugees - Chron.com | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Violence between loyalists of President Bashar Assad and rebels trying to topple his rule has caused more than 3 million people to escape the embattled country, mainly to neighboring Lebanon, Turkey, Jordan and Iraq, and displaced nearly 8 million...
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Great Migration

Great Migration | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The 20th century migration of African Americans from rural communities in the South to large cities in the North and West.

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America Runs On Illegal Immigrants

America Runs On Illegal Immigrants | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Some 11 million people in the US are illegal immigrants, many propping up the economy by working for low cash, no benefits. Will President Obama free the dishwashers?

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How Immigrants Come to Be Seen as Americans - Room for Debate

How Immigrants Come to Be Seen as Americans - Room for Debate | Human Geography | Scoop.it

Why are some immigrants and their descendants considered simply “American,” while others are still thought of as “outsiders”? How does an immigrant group come to be thought of as native?


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mapping population density: some interesting models.

mapping population density: some interesting models. | Human Geography | Scoop.it
I found these cartograms from an article in the Telegraph and was immediately impressed. The cartograms originated here and use data from the Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project as to create the int...

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China’s One Child Policy Causes Sexual Slavery - State Department Report

China’s One Child Policy Causes Sexual Slavery - State Department Report | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The State Department’s annual Trafficking in Persons Report (TIP report) has downgraded China to a Tier 3 nation – a status it now shares with Iran, Sudan and North Korea. Tier 3 nations may be subject to sanctions, if approved by the U.S.

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Rural communities face population challenge - Minden Times

Rural communities face population challenge - Minden Times | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Rural communities face population challenge Minden Times While the populations of municipalities in the GTA are projected to increase during the next 20 years, Caldwell predicted some smaller communities will struggle just to maintain their...

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France's First Free-Speech Challenge After Charlie Hebdo

France's First Free-Speech Challenge After Charlie Hebdo | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Even before last week's horrific events, the relative complexity of free speech in France could be encapsulated by Dieudonné M’bala M’bala⎯a political comedian or practitioner of hate speech, depending on your take.
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Without mental maps, we’re lost

Without mental maps, we’re lost | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Elwood was a senior geographer working on the ground-floor of the very global positioning systems (GPS) and geographic information systems (GIS) he will throw up for discussion in his TEDx talk.

His question: Are we surrendering our innate mental map making abilities to technology and relying on and trusting it too much? And for TEDx audiences only, he’ll toss out ideas on ways to prevent that from happening.

 

Tags: mapping, GPS, cartography, TED, 201.


Via Seth Dixon
Jeff Cherry's insight:

The mind is a terrible thing to waste.

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Géo Bourgogne's curator insight, January 5, 3:31 AM

Croire en la toute puissance des technologies nous ferait perdre notre sens critique ? l'exemple du GPS

Chris Carter's comment, January 5, 7:34 PM
I had the pleasure to participate in Dr. Judy Willis'
(neuroscientist/MS teacher) ( RADTeach.com) keynote address at 21st Century learning in Hong Kong last month, and was further blessed to interview her for my Ed Tech podcast. A point she made that has stuck with me is that graphic organizers/mental maps are like having a second brain. Why would we not take advantage of them?
Chris Carter's curator insight, January 5, 7:35 PM

I had the pleasure to participate in Dr. Judy Willis'
(neuroscientist/MS teacher) ( RADTeach.com) keynote address at 21st Century learning in Hong Kong last month, and was further blessed to interview her for my Ed Tech podcast. A point she made that has stuck with me is that graphic organizers/mental maps are like having a second brain. Why would we not take advantage of them?

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Here's The Most Educated Town In Every State

Here's The Most Educated Town In Every State | Human Geography | Scoop.it
A map showing the towns with the highest number of college graduates in each state.

Via Seth Dixon
Jeff Cherry's insight:

Very interesting!

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Emily Bian's curator insight, September 28, 2014 8:43 PM

Although this map is specific to a city in each state, and not a state as a whole, I still think this map is really interesting. For example, Maryland has the highest percentage of 92.7%, while Texas has a pretty high number of 86.3%. The only place I wouldn't go is North Dakota, with their whooping number of 39%. This is a thematic map, telling us a story of the highest number of college graduates in each state. 

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Kentucky Teacher Resigns Over Parents’ Dumb Ebola Fears

Kentucky Teacher Resigns Over Parents’ Dumb Ebola Fears | Human Geography | Scoop.it
A teacher at St. Margaret Mary Catholic School in Louisville, Kentucky, who recently returned from a medical mission trip to Africa has resigned rather than submitting to a paid 21-day leave and producing a doctor's note that says she is in good health. The school's request was a reaction to "strong parent concerns" about Susan Sherman exposing students to Ebola — though she was in Kenya, which is separated from the Ebola outbreak by at least five countries.

Via Seth Dixon
Jeff Cherry's insight:

This is typical of America's sad ignorance of geography.  Clearly we need to continue to teach locational geography.  I'd suggest we start with the media!

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 4, 2014 6:43 PM

These are the things that make teachers want to retire...but someone has to fight against this great ignorance. Individual ignorance is just fine; not everyone needs to be incredibly educated to have my respect and admiration. But when you couple ignorance with arrogance, well, that's another story.

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150 Years Ago, Sochi Was the Site of a Horrific Ethnic Cleansing

150 Years Ago, Sochi Was the Site of a Horrific Ethnic Cleansing | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Czar Alexander II may have freed the serfs, but his war against the stateless people of the Caucasus cannot be ignored

 

The czar’s approval of this rapid expulsion of hundreds of thousands of Circassians to the Ottoman Empire resulted in an ethnic cleansing through disease and drowning as overcrowded ferries crossed the Black Sea. The Ottomans were unprepared for the influx of refugees, and the absence of adequate shelter caused even more deaths from exposure. Those Circassians who attempted to remain in the Russian Empire and fight for their land were massacred. Sochi’s “Red Hill,” where the skiing and snowboarding events will take place during these Olympic Games, was the site of the Circassian last stand, where the Imperial Russian armies celebrated their “victory” over the local defenders.


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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 18, 2014 1:56 PM

Czar Alexander II was a horrific leader who " ethnicially cleansed" the people of Sochi and cleansed them through disease and drowning as over populated ferries crossed the Black Sea. This act of innaliation of the war against the stateless people is just outrageous and unforgiving. In Sochi the "red hill" where the skiiers and snowboarders are set to take off is the site at which one of the massacres happened, it makes you wonder if the rest of the world knows this or are they ignorant to the fact that the Olympics at Sochi is glorified as having the two veritile terrains in which you can swim and ski in the a couple miles form eachother. I wonder what people who thnk if they knew the truth about Sochi.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 2014 9:13 AM

It is interesting to learn the history of a place that most American’s didn’t know existed until the Olympics.  It is always helpful to have things placed in a historic perspective.  The historic background makes understanding modern day events easier

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 30, 2014 8:33 PM

This is basically like a mini Holocaust. When do people think its okay to do something like this? It boggles my mind how things like this can actually go on in the world still with todays technologies and armed forces. 

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"Natural" Foods?

"The False Advertising Industry reveals the shocking truth about what is allowed in 'Natural' food. Only the USDA Organic Seal guarantees your food contains no Genetically Modified Organisms, no toxic pesticides, and no growth hormones or antibiotics."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 6, 2014 3:22 PM

This funny video shows how meaningless the word "natural" is when it is only used as a buzzword or slogan.  Many food companies are trying to show their "natural" roots these days--some with a new label and others are trying to legitimately clean up their production line.  In fact, McDonald's has gone to great lengths to show their costumers where the food is coming from and to personalize the food producers to alleviate their fears.  They have created a Track my Maccas iPhone App which used several geospatial technologies to explore the commodity chain of McDonalds items (keep in mind that this is the companies own promotional tool). 


Tags: agriculture, GMOs, food production, mapping, geospatial.

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Hans Rosling on global population growth | Video on TED.com

TED Talks The world's population will grow to 9 billion over the next 50 years -- and only by raising the living standards of the poorest can we check population growth.


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Barbara B. Johnson: Immigrants raising citizens creates problems we ignore

Barbara B. Johnson: Immigrants raising citizens creates problems we ignore | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Policymakers generally ignore the development of children of the undocumented. Seldom do they consider the parents and shapers of young citizens.

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Where Americans Are Moving | Newgeography.com

Where Americans Are Moving | Newgeography.com | Human Geography | Scoop.it

Census data reveal that Americans are still drawn to the same sprawling Sun Belt regions as before.


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Timeline

Timeline | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Educating About Immigration features immigration lesson plans and immigration curriculum for teaching about immigration. The site is a one-stop informational and interactive clearinghouse on topics of U.S.

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American Migration [Interactive Map] - Forbes

American Migration [Interactive Map] - Forbes | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Every year, close to 40 million Americans move from one home to another. This interactive map visualizes those moves for every county in the country.

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7 Billion and Counting

Global population trends result from varying levels of population growth and decline among countries. This informative video provides a simple and compelling...

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How does mother tongue affect second language acquisition? | Education News, a service of Renascence School International

How does mother tongue affect second language acquisition? | Education News, a service of Renascence School International | Human Geography | Scoop.it
How does mother tongue affect second language acquisition?
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Kim Jong-Un considers opening restaurant in Scotland selling North Korean ... - Daily Mail

Kim Jong-Un considers opening restaurant in Scotland selling North Korean ... - Daily Mail | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The North Korean leader, who already has a chain of restaurants called Pyongyang is reportedly eager to open up a branch in the UK, with experts saying he is especially keen on Scotland.
Jeff Cherry's insight:

Kimchi haggis! Really?

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Inside The Indiana Megadairy Making Coca-Cola's New Milk

Inside The Indiana Megadairy Making Coca-Cola's New Milk | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Coca-Cola got a lot of attention in November when it announced it was going into the milk business. In fact, its extra-nutritious milk product was invented by some dairy farmers in Indiana.

Via Seth Dixon
Jeff Cherry's insight:

This operation is in Indiana where I'm from.  Farming is big time here!

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Brian Wilk's curator insight, January 22, 6:38 PM

I work for PepsiCo and Coca-Cola needed to do this to stay competitive with us. We distribute Muscle Milk and have had a head start on this growing beverage segment for the consumer looking for protein. Hopefully KO can generate a successful product and challenge their main rivals to come up with a better product so that the consumer can win. Our product is also shelf stable and could be a viable alternative to help with the war on hunger in less developed countries. Here's hoping for KO to be in the game and for PEP to rise to the challenge!

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, January 23, 12:25 PM

unit 5

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NCAA Fan Map: How the Country Roots for College Football

NCAA Fan Map: How the Country Roots for College Football | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Data based on Facebook 'likes' estimates the boundaries of college football fandom.

Via Seth Dixon
Jeff Cherry's insight:

Though a cool map it doesn't take into account the diaspora of fans around the country.  Living here in Houston I certainly see fans from every part of the country in which people once lived. 

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Matt Green's curator insight, October 16, 2014 11:16 AM

I could look at this for hours. Interesting to see what college football teams the country roots for.

 

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9 Reasons the U.S. Ended Up So Much More Car-Dependent Than Europe

9 Reasons the U.S. Ended Up So Much More Car-Dependent Than Europe | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Understanding mistakes of the past can help guide U.S. transportation policy in the future.

 

In 2010, Americans drove for 85 percent of their daily trips, compared to car trip shares of 50 to 65 percent in Europe. Longer trip distances only partially explain the difference. Roughly 30 percent of daily trips are shorter than a mile on either side of the Atlantic. But of those under one-mile trips, Americans drove almost 70 percent of the time, while Europeans made 70 percent of their short trips by bicycle, foot, or public transportation.  The statistics don't reveal the sources of this disparity, but there are nine main reasons American metro areas have ended up so much more car-dependent than cities in Western Europe.


Via Seth Dixon
Jeff Cherry's insight:

The correlation to our obesity rates cannot e be ignored.

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Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 5, 2014 2:16 PM

Roads in the US are a congested mess, especially when compared with Europe. This article discusses the interesting historical, political, economic, and cultural factors that have led to the different directions taken. The US was quicker to adopt the automobile and to build the appropriate infrastructure to facilitate the rapid expansion of the car. Europe has made political efforts, like higher tax rates, to promote alternative transportation methods which allowed their public transportation methods to expand and develop more than they have in the US.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 14, 2014 4:36 PM

The United States developed to be much more car dependent that the cities of Western Europe. While many European cities were already tightly developed and sprawled, a lot of development in the United States occurred after the influx of automobiles. Cheap gas mixed with more and more people depended on automobiles allowed for infrastructure to develop more spread out. Because of cars, people could travel farther than they used to in a shorter time period. People no longer had to live in the city to work in the city, so suburban neighborhoods developed. European cities were mostly developed to their maximum area, therefore roads were built mostly to connect cities, not to intersect them. 

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 2:15 PM

Its easier for European countries to commit to cycling, walking and taking public transportation for the simple fact that their travel distance is shorter to that of the United States. A trip that can take Europeans 30 mins to travel can take Americans 45-60 mins of travel, depending where they are centrally located. I can agree with Europeans committing to using other alternatives to getting around their city versus using a car. They are more inclined to participate in physical activities, they are lowering their fuel emission, all in all, its a better decision for the environment.