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Unit 5 Agriculture: GMO-Free Europe

Unit 5 Agriculture: GMO-Free Europe | Human Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Jason Wilhelm's insight:

The GMO debate is raging throughout the world. Many believe that these crops have many harmful effects on the human body due their their altered genetic state. Thankfully, many countries are adopting a non-GMO attitude, as illustrated in the above map, so as to prevent the many poor side-effects they have.

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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, February 5, 2014 2:47 PM

Parts of Europe know to be GMO free. When will we?

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 2014 6:44 PM

This map is the epitome of agricultural geography and the beginning of a series of questions such as why did all of Europe choose to be GMO-free? Or, does the proximity of European countries have to do with the fact that they share similar values (such as being GMO-free)? What does the EU have to do with this pattern? Because the EU chooses to be GMO-free, European countries are making a statement and consequently refining agricultural markets by refusing to import certain genetically modified foods. Agricultural geography thus shares some patterns across space- with all of Europe sharing simile agricultural policies. 

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 29, 8:23 AM

This is an interesting development that has major implications for the world and its food supply. The social and political buzz combined with corporate profits intersecting with morality about sums up this complex and diverse issue.

One platform is the compliance of companies using GMO's without placing it on the ingredient label. People clearly have a right to know what's going in their bodies, and to choose whether or not they want to.

Another is that GMO's are nearly everywhere in the food system, with some estimates that 70% of the corn produced is of this variety. For folks who want to feed the world and prevent hunger more efficiently this is a huge win. Think of the lives disease resistant grains alone could save.

But is it safe?

Other issues include, how crops that are non-GMO can be inadvertently cross-pollinated with those that are naturally grown. How is that being monitored, and who is doing it? Is it self-policed or are governments watching over this?

My personal worry is that we create a crop that causes digestive or nutrient issues that "infects" the food supply, or worse, we take the technology to humans with dire consequences. This will be one of the hot topics that will be debated for decades to come. Corporate greed versus what's right for the people of the world. Call me a romantic, but I hope we as society do the right thing and feed our planet first. Perhaps money can be genetically modified to have less of an importance in society.

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Unit 7 Cities and Urban Land Use: Globalization, Structural Change and Urban Land Management

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This articles studies how the globalization of the world has led to expanding cities due to inflows of capital into developing nation and developed nations alike. The cities of Latin America, Asia, and Central and Eastern Europe are being transformed by this phenomenon over the last few decades. With increased globalized the cities of the world are being forced to institute new regulations to control growth of urban areas.  

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Unit 5 Agricultural and Rural Land Use: Florida Land Development Regulations

Unit 5 Agricultural and Rural Land Use: Florida Land Development Regulations | Human Geography | Scoop.it
For writers, administrators, users, and challengers of Florida land development regulations.
Jason Wilhelm's insight:

This website is a database for the court cases and legislative decisions that have influenced the land use and regulation of land development in Florida. These articles would be helpful in tracking how land use has changed in the US over the years and how and why the regulations have changed. 

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Unit 5 Agricultural and Rural Land Use: NAFTA an empty basket for farmers in southern Mexico

Unit 5 Agricultural and Rural Land Use: NAFTA an empty basket for farmers in southern Mexico | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"When the agreement between the United States, Mexico and Canada went into effect in 1994, it removed nearly all trade barriers between the countries. Among the industries affected was agriculture, forcing small Mexican farmers into direct competition with big American agribusiness. Cheap American corn – heavily subsidized, mechanized and genetically modified – soon flooded the Mexican market to the detriment of local farmers.  As U.S. farmers exported their subsidized corn to Mexico, local producer prices plummeted and small farmers could no longer earn enough to live on."


Via Seth Dixon
Jason Wilhelm's insight:

The American agricultural industry has been highly subsidized by the government to create interest in farming and food production. This causes problems for America's neighboring countries' resident farmers. The Mexican corn farmers are struggling mightily with the influx of cheap American corn into Mexico due to the open trade policies created by NAFTA. Some tariffs or new economic regulations must be created to protect Mexican corn farmers and regulate the amount of cheap American corn that is flooding Mexican markets. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 28, 2014 9:06 AM

International trade agreements are usually discussed at the national level.  "NAFTA benefits Mexico" is a commonly heard saying because trade with the United States and Canada strengthens the manufacturing sector in Mexico.  Even if there is an overall benefit to a country, there are always winners and losers for different regions, economic sectors and many other demographic groups.   Farmers in southern Mexico were certainly a sector that struggled mightily under NAFTA.


Tags: Mexicosupranationalism, industry, place, agriculture, food production,

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, September 29, 2014 12:44 PM

With all the good we thought NAFTA did for the three countries involved, I feel that sometimes we overlook the bad.  Southern Mexico has felt all negative affects from NAFTA.  While the northern states in Mexico are able to keep up with the advanced agricultural processes that America has, the south is unable to.  The old techniques and lack of machinery prevents the south from having any possible competition with the north as well as America leaving the south to become extremely impoverished and potentially unsuitable for any living.

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Unit 4 Political Organization of Space: Crimea, Nagorno-Karabakh and the Gordian Knot

Unit 4 Political Organization of Space: Crimea, Nagorno-Karabakh and the Gordian Knot | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Is this an opportune moment for Eurasian powers to tackle the festering Nagorno-Karabakh conflict?

Via Seth Dixon
Jason Wilhelm's insight:

The Crimea region has been hotly debated and fought over for quite a while now. The collapse of the USSR created a power vacuum in Eastern Europe which led to the contest for power in many of the former Soviet Satellite countries, including Ukraine. The Crimean peninsula, while mostly occupied by Russians, is legally a part of Ukraine, but maybe not for long. The Russian government is seemingly working to annex the peninsula while the Ukrainian government is working to keep it. The region will continue to be under lots of tugging and pulling for a while until a single government wins in to their nation. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 18, 2014 4:00 PM

Recently Crimea has has been a hot topic and in years past Chechyna was another much discussed topic.  Both of these ‘hot spots’ have some important geographic reasons as to why they are hot spots.  The collapse of the Soviet Union and the subsequent re-emergence of the Russian Federation have created geopolitical ripples that reverberate throughout the region.  Transnistria, Abkhazia and Novorussiya are places that few have ever heard about, but are now becoming critical locations for international relations because of they have an uncertain status that might shift soon.  One place to add to that list is Nagorno Karabakh, a region that is ethnically Armenian but nestled within Azerbaijan.  This article argues that now is an opportune moment to settle this issue that has been festering since the 90s, even if many feel that the international community is indifferent on the issue.    


Tags: political, sovereignty, territoriality, statesAzerbaijan, Armenia.

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, May 19, 2014 12:26 PM

You can find this on https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nagorno-Karabakh

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Unit 7 Cities and Urban Land Use: Aerial housing photographs show stark division between rich and poor in Mexico

Unit 7 Cities and Urban Land Use: Aerial housing photographs show stark division between rich and poor in Mexico | Human Geography | Scoop.it
A new advertising campaign is seeking to draw attention to the gap between the wealthy and the poverty-stricken in Mexico by showing how they co-exist in disturbingly close proximity.

Via Seth Dixon
Jason Wilhelm's insight:

The stark differences in housing arrangements in Mexico is an example of the division of urban land use in developing cities. We can see that the poor are still living in squalid conditions while the rich are living in modern-style apartments and condos. The unfortunate fact of the matter is that the poor people in urban areas are slighted in all facets of the word whether it be resources, housing, or overall sanitation. 

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, June 17, 2014 8:35 AM

And again in Brazil

http://civitasinclusive.wordpress.com/2013/03/16/paraisopolis-brazil-by-tuca-vieira-2004/

Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 3, 2014 1:21 PM

The pictures show the deep divide between rich and poor in Mexico. These settlements are built to the point where luxurious condos share a wall with decaying slum housing. The roads do not connect the areas, showing how these places were constructed separately by to distinctly different communities. While the proximity between sections shows that sights, sounds, and smells most likely carry across the two sections, the rich area looks as if it has no idea what lies directly beyond their walls. The fact that the rich areas are literally walled off from the rest of the surrounding area says a lot about the deep economic divides found around the world today.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 9:02 AM

Right away from looking at this picture, you can tell which side is which. I didn't even have to read the article yet to find out where the wealthier people lived and where the not so wealthy lived. The colors stood out the most to me. In the picture on the left, it is clear that this is the not so wealthy part in Mexico. The color is just filled with dark and gloominess, mostly shown in gray. The houses are also pushed very closely together. On the right side, it appears that this is the richer side of Mexico. Although the houses are closer together like the picture on the left, they are colorful. They have firm built roofs and appear to be built and taken care of much better. Something else that gives you the sense of which community is more rich is the cars. There is a whole line of cars in the right picture while in the left picture we see a few here and there. The right picture also illustrates lawns. We slightly see some grass in the left, but it is clearly not as well taken care of as the lawns in the right picture. This picture was done as an advertisement to draw attention to the gap between the two different communities. The campaign goes by the name "Erase the Differences" and hopes to get people to realize the differences in poverty that are right in front of them.

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Unit 4 Political Organization of Space: 22 International Borders

Unit 4 Political Organization of Space: 22 International Borders | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Brazil (top) and Bolivia (bottom)."


Via Seth Dixon
Jason Wilhelm's insight:

The concept of a political boundary has been developed over many many years into an unbreakable line between two different sets of people with different ideologies, religions, and government styles. The boundary extends into the ground, into the air, and includes any resources within the boundary. These pictures show the different shapes and various lines between countries, and displays the intricacies of boundaries in the world.  

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, May 6, 2014 7:49 PM

Borders can tell us a great feel about the relationship beween the two  nations.

Kampe Kyle's curator insight, May 28, 2014 10:21 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the concept of land use patterns. As certain countries practice deforestation, slash-and-burn and other land use types, bordering countries may take a completely indifferent approach to the land and thus create a contrast.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 2014 1:11 AM

Photographs show how different countries can be even by just the border. Number 3 really stuck out to me that Haiti doesnt have as many regulation reguarding deforestation as the Dominican Republic and its very noticable.

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Unit 7 Cities and Urban Land Use: Primate Cities: Mexico City

http://geographyeducation.org/2014/05/05/primate-cities-mexico-city/


Via Seth Dixon
Jason Wilhelm's insight:

The concept of a primate city has both benefits and drawbacks for the country in which it is located. The large population of the primate city draws new technology and foreign investment into the country. Unfortunately, the large population of the primate city also leads to population and brain drain from the surrounding regions which can damage the overall economic and intellectual status of the country. 

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Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 26, 7:31 PM

This slide show teaches you what primate cities are and gives you an example and background of one. It teaches you about Mexico City and the characteristics of it. 

 

This article relates to Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use because it teaches you about primate cities. Primate cities have disproportionately large populations and is over two times larger than the next largest city in the country

Zohair Ahmed's curator insight, May 27, 12:10 AM

This power point shows the negative and positive factors accounting for Mexico City being a Primate city. 

 

The pp gives insight on how Primate cities such as Mexico have a disproportionally large population, resulting in an unbalanced economy.

Anna Sasaki's curator insight, May 27, 7:45 AM

Mexico City is a primate city, since it's population is significantly larger than any other city in Mexico. Primate cities are only deemed primate cities if they are double or more the population of the running up city.

Primate cities show population distribution since a large majority of the population is centralized around one area.

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Unit 5 Agriculture: Smarter Food: Does big farming mean bad farming?

Unit 5 Agriculture: Smarter Food: Does big farming mean bad farming? | Human Geography | Scoop.it
In Minnesota, ‘industrial’ operation shows effort to balance economic, environmental sustainability.

Via Seth Dixon
Jason Wilhelm's insight:

The large-scale agricultural practices of modern America tend to lend to the bad image of commercial farming. However, the practices are actually helping feed more people in the US, but they also use genetically modified crops and other highly debated techniques.

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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:22 AM

In this modern age the words health and cheap are rarley paired together and especiall not in Agriculture. Farmers have to make the decision wether they want to be profitable and continue their family farm or to try to be organinc and continue their families practices. Its nearly impossible to combine the two. What mr thompson decided to do is common among the farming community and that is to pruduce crops with high profit yeilds such as GM soy but also take the nessacary precautions to not danger the surronding enviroment. Hopefully in the future healthier farming is mor profitable farming so people wont have to straddle this moral line.

Pranav Pradeep's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:24 AM

Yes it does because in all large scale endeavors, regardless of what for, the quality is always sacrificed for the quantity because it becomes cheaper to produce and profits are greater.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 11:45 AM

Yes it does because in all large scale endeavors, regardless of what for, the quality is always sacrificed for the quantity because it becomes cheaper to produce and profits are greater.

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Unit 3 Cultural Patterns and Processes: Weekend Update: Billie Jean King - Onsite Player

Unit 3 Cultural Patterns and Processes: Weekend Update: Billie Jean King - Onsite Player | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Watch "Weekend Update: Billie Jean King" from the hit NBC Comedy, Saturday Night Live.
Jason Wilhelm's insight:

This satirical interview with "Billy Jean King" helps illustrate the views of Americans and much of the rest of the world on the Anti-Gay propaganda and laws in Russia. SNL often broaches these difficult topics through humor and sarcasm in order to present a version of world news.

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Unit 1 Nature and Perspectives: Drying of the Aral Sea

Explore a global timelapse of our planet, constructed from Landsat satellite imagery. With water diverted to irrigation, the inland Aral Sea has shrunk drama...

Via Seth Dixon
Jason Wilhelm's insight:

The drying up of major water sources all over the world is a major problem faced by multiple governments. The Aral Sea is the water source for a variety of countries in the region, which leads the world populatioin to the idea that a solution must be devised to moderate the water usage. The timelapse helps illustrate the ebb and flow of the water level is a tool that can be used to help learn about the crisis that is the loss of water in the Aral Sea.

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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, October 7, 2014 11:27 AM

The Aral Sea’s receding waters could prove fatal to the surrounding agriculture. Both Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan diverted the rivers that flowed into the Sea in the 1960s to feed their growing cotton and rice farms. Over the last five decades, the lack of a water source flowing into the Aral Sea combined with harsher droughts due to climate change have caused the water to evaporate at an alarming rate. As the water evaporates, large deposits of minerals remain on the bare lake bed. Winds pick up the mineral deposits and often spread them onto farms, where the increased salinity destroys rice paddies and other crops. The destruction of crops causes less food production, so less money is made by the farmers and more money has to be spent to bring in food to avoid famine. Cotton crops are also destroyed, so the region loses yet another source of income.

The increased evaporation of the Aral Sea has also caused an incredible increase to salinity levels in the lake itself. The extremely salty water cannot be used without heavy removing the salt, which is incredibly unaffordable in an already stressed region. Small subsidence farmers and local farmers cannot use the resource at hand. The fishing industry has completely collapsed, thus removing another important resource from the area.

If a wounded economy and unreliable food was not enough, the air born minerals blown away from the lake are causing numerous health problems. Respiratory issues, such as asthma, are becoming more and more common in the communities surrounding the Aral Sea due to the minerals and industrial debris in the air. The disappearance of the Sea has created the perfect conditions for the collapse of a region. The struggle that the people have to endure often escalates into increased social and political unrest, and disputes often occur. The Aral Sea exemplifies how one small environmental change can set off a chain of devastating events that lead to irreversible effects.

               

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 19, 2014 8:19 PM

The drying of the Aral Sea opens our eyes to how fragile our environment is and the scarcity of resources.  We need to become more aware of our resources, because as they saying goes, the "well will run dry."

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 22, 2014 2:33 PM

This video shows a time lapse of the Aral Sea's near demise. A once viable fishing area this salt lake now resembles a desert. The Aral Sea is comprised of salt water however much of the water being funneled in was fresh. Through human tampering this body of water has nearly dried. Some areas have been "saved" through damming and heavy rain fall although it may be too late for the southern end of the Aral Sea.

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Unit 2 Population: Population by Latitude and Longitude

Unit 2 Population: Population by Latitude and Longitude | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Radical Cartography, brought to you by Bill Rankin

Via Seth Dixon
Jason Wilhelm's insight:

The spacial distribution of the population of people on Earth arranged by longitude and latitude. Very interesting data when you take into account the population clusters spread around the world as depicted by the spikes of purple along the vertical and horizontal axes.

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Geoff Findley's curator insight, January 9, 2014 9:37 PM

Cool Cartogram...

 

Keisha Lewis's curator insight, January 12, 2014 8:15 AM

Majorly cool! So many discussions about population distribution can come out of this. :)

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 2014 6:53 PM

We can see that the majority of the world's population is clustered in the mid latitudes in particularly Asia. Showing population in terms of latitude shows how people live based on environmental factors while longitude remains the same throughout, thus showing countries/continents and their rates of population simply based off of that country's growth rate or demographic momentum aside from just looking at climatic preference. For instance, Asia is the most populated area and this is evident because of the current growth rates. 

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Unit 4 Political Organization of Space: Create Your Visited States and Provinces Map

Unit 4 Political Organization of Space: Create Your Visited States and Provinces Map | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Create a color-coded Visited States Map, showing off your road travel in the United States.
Jason Wilhelm's insight:

This just a really cool, simple way to categorize the United States based on prior experiences. Its interesting to see where one has been, and how much that place has influenced them due to the amount of time spent there. It's cool to see where you have been on a national scale.

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Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 29, 2014 11:52 AM

An activity to see how the political organization is noticed in your mind.

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Unit 4 Political Organization of Space: UNHCR - Democratic Republic of the Congo

Unit 4 Political Organization of Space: UNHCR - Democratic Republic of the Congo | Human Geography | Scoop.it
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The incredible conflict within the borders of the Democratic Republic of the Congo is  depressing. The massive number of people displaced by the violence is growing quite quickly, and no real end to the migration is in sight. Thankfully, the UN's department that tracks any type of migration is working to come up with sustainable solutions that are within the bounds of international aid charities. All we can hope for is the end of the conflicts within the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and a solution to the problem that is effective and achievable. 

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Unit 6 Industrialization and Economic Development: Japanese Industrialization and Economic Growth

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The economic development in Japan has been rapid and extremely influential in its changing into a world economic power. Japan has very few natural resources inside its political boundaries, so it must rely on those of its neighboring countries for manufacturing supplies. The industrialization of Japan has been extremely abnormal due to it lack of resources and seemingly difficult situation in terms of location and rapid population growth. They have overcome these difficulties and become an economic force in the global market. 

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Unit 5 Agricultural and Rural Land Use: Is Rural Land Use Too Important To Be Left To Farmers?

Unit 5 Agricultural and Rural Land Use: Is Rural Land Use Too Important To Be Left To Farmers? | Human Geography | Scoop.it
As demands on rural land increase and we are all having to deal with the effects of climate change, we may need to take a fresh look at our priorities, according to leading academics meeting in the UK. Research from the Relu Program will be important for the complex policy decisions about land use that need to be taken at national and regional level. Is it time for a debate on a land use planning system for the countryside?
Jason Wilhelm's insight:

The demands for increased agricultural production have put more emphasis on the management of rural land use. Some questions have been raised on whether or not the management of said rural land should be done by the farmers themselves. The development of a rural land use regulation committee could help make the use of farmland more focused, but the farmers have their own systems for managing their own land that have worked for many years. This debate is one that needs to be resolved in order to properly use our farm land.

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Unit 1 Nature and Perspectives: Airport Regions

Unit 1 Nature and Perspectives: Airport Regions | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Jason Davies has divided the world into roughly 3,000 regions for all the medium and large airports in the world. Naturally, the wealthiest regions with high population densities have the greatest number of airports, but the Voronoi diagram shows just how much of the planet is sparsely served by air travel. If we have flyover states in the US, then there are clearly massive swaths of flyover land in the rest of the world. The most remote airport in the world, you ask? Mataveri International Airport on Easter Island, which is 1,617 miles (2,602km) from the next nearest airport." --The Verge


Via Seth Dixon
Jason Wilhelm's insight:

This map shows the ranges of each respective air port of the world. Through this map we can see the relationship between wealth and airport range, and isolation of country and airport range. The most wealthy areas have the longest range airports, and the poorest areas have the shortest range airport. We can tell that the isolated airports have the largest range out of necessity, while those of small nations have smaller ranges due to their proximity to other airports. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 12, 2014 11:54 AM

So, is this an example of formal, functional or vernacular regions? 

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 27, 2014 4:40 PM

This map divides the world into functional regions, with each region servicing its own air travel based on incoming and exiting flights from that specific airport. Dividing the world into regions is a way of thinking spatially, with functional regions being a particular type based off of communication patterns. 

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Unit 3 Cultural Patterns and Processes: 'Neo-Andean' architecture sprouts in Bolivia

Unit 3 Cultural Patterns and Processes: 'Neo-Andean' architecture sprouts in Bolivia | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Brash, baroque and steeped in native Andean symbols, the mini-mansions are a striking sight on the caked-dirt streets of El Alto, the inexorably expanding sister city of Bolivia's capital."


Via Seth Dixon
Jason Wilhelm's insight:

The resurgence of old-style architecture in developed places is shown in this article. The New-Andean style of architecture showcases bright colors and traditional patterns of the natives in South America is gaining popularity once again. Old styles of living and architecture had been fading for many years, but are now coming back into popularity after many Native groups have revived their traditional cultures and ways of life. 

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Miroslav Sopko's curator insight, May 27, 2014 9:10 AM

Nový architektonický štýl?

Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 23, 2014 11:29 AM

As indigenous Bolivians moved from rural areas to the larger cities, they were able to establish themselves and become successful and eventually wealthy. They are now using their wealth to build opulent mansions that reflect their cultural heritage. Their new manors are blend of modern with traditional Aymara culture, symbolizing the Aymara's economic and political rise. 

Bob Beaven's curator insight, February 12, 2:48 PM

Indigenous peoples across the world are beginning to take pride in their heritage once again, after being told by the forces of the imperialism in their countries, that it was not as good as European culture.  This article shows how in Bolivia, the Aymara people, a native group of the country, are rising to political, economic, and social prominence in the country.  Even the country's leader is from this group.  The architecture of this new rich class reflects native heritage but has elements of globalization.  The "castle" mentioned in the article has indoor soccer pitches (originally a European Sport) but it has so much popularity in South America, that the region is known for it today (look no further than Argentina's Lionel Messi or Brazil's Neymar).  The ballrooms also have European chandeliers, but so strong is the native influenced expressed in the houses, that they take these global factors and make them their own.  I believe this is a beneficial fact, the indigenous people across the world should be proud of their heritage and diverse backgrounds.

 

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Unit 7 Industrialization and Economic Development: The Ship-Breakers

Unit 7 Industrialization and Economic Development: The Ship-Breakers | Human Geography | Scoop.it

ustiIn Bangladesh men desperate for work perform one of the world’s most dangerous jobs.


Via Seth Dixon
Jason Wilhelm's insight:

This article shows how parts of the world plays host to some of the more dangerous industries in existence because they are desperate for jobs and will take any work that comes their way. The ship-breakers are mostly men that work to recycle retired cargo ships. This job is extraordinary dangerous due to the fact that the ships are built not to be taken apart. We can see the lack of development in some parts of the world through this industry's presence in southwest Asia. 

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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 8, 9:00 PM

I like the part of this article that asks "In the West you don’t let people pollute your countries by breaking up ships on your beaches. Why is it OK for poor workers to risk their lives to dispose of your unwanted ships here?”  This statement is so true and of course is related to the money that is saved by outsourcing the job of breaking down the ships.  Not only does it save the West money, but it saves the land by not bringing the pollution upon us.  There has to be a way to do this job more environmentally friendly and making it safer for the workers.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, April 22, 10:46 AM

I always wondered what happened to ships after they were taken out of service, I've seen images of airplane grave yards out west, filled with 747's and other planes just rotting away. Though some of those planes are huge, ships are definitely larger and take up more space. 

 

The waste of the ships is incredible. The hull may be the visible part of the vessel but on the inside, the ship is filled with toxic waste from its days of transporting oil. Asbestos is also laden within the older ships since health laws were not as strict in pre-1980 world.

 

It is easy to see how Bangladesh became the ship deconstruction capital of the world. Toxic material disposal in the Western world is incredibly expensive since it is done correctly. Bangladesh has cheap labour and the laws in regards to the disposal of toxic waste are loose. Where a company in the West may haul in less of a profit because of the cost of disposal, Bangladeshi companies are able to take in a one million dollar return on a five million dollar investment. 

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 22, 6:53 PM

With the health risks and pollution that is ruining the soil aside, this seems like a great buiseness and way to make money for many people who are unqualified to do anything else.  Its almost like the people working in factories and in the steel mills during the beginning of the industrial revolution.  Many jobs were hazardous for your health and your surroundings, but it is a way to make a living.  I can see why it happens in this part of the world as apposed to others due to the low wages these people are working for, thus making this even more profitable to the people running the show.

 

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Unit 1 Nature and Perspectives: Geographic Calibrations

Unit 1 Nature and Perspectives: Geographic Calibrations | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Occasionally we need to be reminded that the concepts of distance and area are important to the day-to-day understanding of breaking news stories, as well as many of our daily personal decisions. Although modern communications and transportation have reduced the roles of distance and area in some activities, by no means has it eliminated the utility of these concepts."


Via Seth Dixon
Jason Wilhelm's insight:

A central theme of geography is place and the spacial organization of it. The USA is an extremely large area and its citizens often don't recognize this fact. Manifest destiny was a concept that stated that it was an American's duty to expand into the frontier to further the dominion of the American government. This imperialistic tendency ended when the US reached the Atlantic Ocean, but the land conquered was vast. Many countries in the world can fit many times over into the continental United States, but the citizens of the states take this fact for granted. This article serves as a needed reminder of this fact, and helps people put America's spacial consumption into perspective. 

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Philippe Sallet's curator insight, May 21, 2014 3:35 AM

Tojours très parlant....

Jordan Schemmel's curator insight, May 21, 2014 12:56 PM

We tend to forget how easy it is to compare the sizes and distances, especially when considering the move form 3D to 2D. Something to consider when reading and interpreting maps.

Clarissa Rangel's curator insight, May 28, 2014 8:50 PM

Really puts the size of countries into perspective... 

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Unit 7 Cities and Urban Land Use: Comparing Urban Footprints Around the World

Unit 7 Cities and Urban Land Use: Comparing Urban Footprints Around the World | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"In the above poster the cities are arranged (roughly, in order to maximize space) by population. Clearly, size and population are not directly correlated. Some cities take up a lot more space for a smaller population. The relationship between the two, of course, is known as density (population density, urban density)."


Via Seth Dixon
Jason Wilhelm's insight:

Urban sprawl is a rising problem in the world due to the lack of control and its massive impact on the surrounding environment. These footprints show how unique each city's sprawl is. The surrounding environment is playing a huge role in where and how far each city extends. Chicago, for example, is limited on its eastern side due to Lake Erie's close proximity, and Cleveland is in a similar situation but on its north side where Lake Erie is. 

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Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, May 14, 2014 4:38 PM

Surprenant et très pédagogique

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:35 PM

The cities are organized (approximately) to population and shows the size of cities accordingly. The different sizes of cities and their correlating populations is thus revealed from urban places around the world. 

Urban regions stay rather functional and could be seem similar across the board, focusing on major economic activity and transportation.

Mrs. Karnowski-Simul's curator insight, August 27, 2014 7:17 AM

1G Theme 2: 6 Billion people and me

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Unit 5 Agriculture: GMO-Free Europe

Unit 5 Agriculture: GMO-Free Europe | Human Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Jason Wilhelm's insight:

The GMO debate is raging throughout the world. Many believe that these crops have many harmful effects on the human body due their their altered genetic state. Thankfully, many countries are adopting a non-GMO attitude, as illustrated in the above map, so as to prevent the many poor side-effects they have.

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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, February 5, 2014 2:47 PM

Parts of Europe know to be GMO free. When will we?

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 2014 6:44 PM

This map is the epitome of agricultural geography and the beginning of a series of questions such as why did all of Europe choose to be GMO-free? Or, does the proximity of European countries have to do with the fact that they share similar values (such as being GMO-free)? What does the EU have to do with this pattern? Because the EU chooses to be GMO-free, European countries are making a statement and consequently refining agricultural markets by refusing to import certain genetically modified foods. Agricultural geography thus shares some patterns across space- with all of Europe sharing simile agricultural policies. 

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 29, 8:23 AM

This is an interesting development that has major implications for the world and its food supply. The social and political buzz combined with corporate profits intersecting with morality about sums up this complex and diverse issue.

One platform is the compliance of companies using GMO's without placing it on the ingredient label. People clearly have a right to know what's going in their bodies, and to choose whether or not they want to.

Another is that GMO's are nearly everywhere in the food system, with some estimates that 70% of the corn produced is of this variety. For folks who want to feed the world and prevent hunger more efficiently this is a huge win. Think of the lives disease resistant grains alone could save.

But is it safe?

Other issues include, how crops that are non-GMO can be inadvertently cross-pollinated with those that are naturally grown. How is that being monitored, and who is doing it? Is it self-policed or are governments watching over this?

My personal worry is that we create a crop that causes digestive or nutrient issues that "infects" the food supply, or worse, we take the technology to humans with dire consequences. This will be one of the hot topics that will be debated for decades to come. Corporate greed versus what's right for the people of the world. Call me a romantic, but I hope we as society do the right thing and feed our planet first. Perhaps money can be genetically modified to have less of an importance in society.

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Unit 4 Political Organization of Space: Democratic Republic of Congo profile

Unit 4 Political Organization of Space: Democratic Republic of Congo profile | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Jason Wilhelm's insight:

This article is a well written account of the course the conflict in the DR Congo has taken over the years. It explains the sides of the wars including which countries backed which leaders through a particular coup or invasion. The leaders who either took power or were elected at some point often changed their views or enraged their people which caused most of these conflicts.

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Unit 4 Political Organization of Space: A short, recent history of Congo

Mapping the war in Congo: mineral wealth, militias and an epic march

Via Seth Dixon
Jason Wilhelm's insight:

The conflict in the DROC is an extremely complex, inter-cultural war that has been continued since the Belgians left in 1960. The rushed and violent rule imposed by the Belgian's King Leopold II caused problems from the start, and it didn't help when they left the burden of government to the unorganized people of the region. Millions of people have been killed throughout the conflict, many of whom were children. This video is very educational about the conflict and its causes over the years.

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 2014 3:04 PM

A very comprehensive coverage of the past 20 years. I did not realize just how much Rwanda influenced the major problems in the Congo. Having the capital city of Kinshasa so geographically far away from its "trouble border" is probably making it more difficult to control.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 31, 4:10 PM

This video is tough to follow at times due to the amount of information that is given in less than five minutes, but it gives a brief and thorough account of the dynamics that have taken place in the Rwanda/Congo region.  This genocide is a very popular one in historical scholarship but I have not had an opportunity to spend any time researching it.  This video definitely provided me with a strong understanding of what happened.  It also shows how countries can support certain individuals or entities that, many times, ends up backfiring on them.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 9, 2:39 PM

This is another sad story.  There is fast wealth in this area.  More than enough to get this economy off the ground and be a booming source of wealth for the countries.  Ever since the British, Belgiums, and foreigners created conflict in the area there has been so much unrest. They need to get out of their own ways and elect someone who won't steal millions.  They could get back to the golden days, but not until they have some peace which would then lead to prosperity.  

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Unit 1 Nature and Perspectives: Typhoon Haiyan Blamed On Both Human And Natural Causes - Huffington Post

Unit 1 Nature and Perspectives: Typhoon Haiyan Blamed On Both Human And Natural Causes - Huffington Post | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Toledo Blade
Typhoon Haiyan Blamed On Both Human And Natural Causes
Huffington Post
University of Miami hurricane researcher Brian McNoldy figures that 75 to 80 percent of the devastation can be blamed on the human factor.
Jason Wilhelm's insight:

This is amazing to think that such an immense natural disaster might actually have its roots in human actions. The typhoon is the epitome of the results of human environment interactions, and their impact on the environment. It also shows us that we must be careful how we build our cities, what we do with our resources, and that our actions have resounding effects on the natural world whether we know it or not. 

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Unit 2 Population: Migration Information Source

Unit 2 Population: Migration Information Source | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Migration data from around the world - at your fingertips. Generate tables, create graphs, follow trends. Find out who is going where and how migration is shaping social, political, demographic, and economic futures country by country.
Jason Wilhelm's insight:

This website is extremely insightful. It contains a massive amount of information that is helpful in the pursuit of education on the very tense, and complicated issues of migration and immigration. It came in handy throughout my search for valid information on said issues. The migrations of the world are constantly changing and are dynamic movements of people through space according the the current events in their specific area at the time. Africa is consistently one of the most moving places in the world due to multiple conflicts that seem to be happening at all times. 

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