Human Geography
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Gay Marriage State by State: From a Few States to the Whole Nation

Gay Marriage State by State: From a Few States to the Whole Nation | Human Geography | Scoop.it
How the number of states allowing same-sex marriage grew.
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Illuminating North Korea

Illuminating North Korea | Human Geography | Scoop.it
A photographer parts the curtains on one of the world’s least-known places and brings back pictures of a country that is defined for many by mystery and war.
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A Migrant Mother’s Anguished Choice

A Migrant Mother’s Anguished Choice | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Lost in the diplomatic wrangling over the fate of the Rohingya fleeing Myanmar are the harrowing personal consequences.
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Video: In Yulin, It’s Dog Lovers vs. Dog Eaters

Video: In Yulin, It’s Dog Lovers vs. Dog Eaters | Human Geography | Scoop.it
As part of the summer solstice celebrations in Yulin, China, thousands of canines are slaughtered and served up in a controversial dog meat festival.
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Global Poverty Drops Sharply, With China Making Big Strides, U.N. Report Says

Global Poverty Drops Sharply, With China Making Big Strides, U.N. Report Says | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The conclusion came in a final report on the successes and failures of the Millennium Development Goals, a set of targets established 15 years ago to improve the lives of the poor.
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Outsourced.2006.LiMiTED.DVDRip.XviD-LPD.[www.UsaBit.com] - YouTube

Để tiện cho các bạn tiết kiệm thời gian trong việc học môn Giao tiếp liên văn hóa thì mình upload lên đây cho các bạn tiện theo dõi....!
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we were at 1:15. Please watch the rest...

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The Case for Cul-de-Sacs

The Case for Cul-de-Sacs | Human Geography | Scoop.it
People who live in them actually have greater social cohesion, according to one sociologist.

 

Thomas R. Hochschild Jr. actually first encountered the social cohesion of cul-de-sacs in his latest research when he wandered into one in Connecticut with his clipboard and polo shirt, and someone called the cops.  That never happened on the other types of streets he was studying, places where it would turn out the neighbors didn't know each other as well, and it was less clear who "belonged." Repeatedly, though, he found at the end of cul-de-sacs families who watched each others' children and took in each others' mail, who barbequed and orchestrated the removal of snow together, and who considered each other close friends. In cul-de-sacs, these families had a stronger sense of shared social space and territoriality. An outsider stood out.


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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, February 23, 2014 8:33 PM

Living in a cul-de-sac sounds very inviting.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 24, 2014 1:32 PM

I lived in a col-de-sac for a number of years. My family and I had very close relationships with our two neighbors within our col-de-sac. We had parties together and helped each other out in times of need - this article is spot on.  

Matt Richardson's curator insight, February 25, 2014 10:13 AM

Interesting article about suburban design.

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Spoof on Agricultural Standards


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Josune Erkizia's curator insight, March 5, 2014 2:49 AM

Very funny

Marie-Ann Roberts's curator insight, March 5, 2014 3:51 AM

Good for sessions on Animal Welfare and Farm Assurance.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:07 PM

unit 5

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Shanghai's Global Ascendance

Shanghai's Global Ascendance | Human Geography | Scoop.it

Reuters photographer Carlos Barria recently spent time in Shanghai, China, the fastest-growing city in the world. A week ago, he took this amazing shot, recreating the same framing and perspective as a photograph taken in 1987, showing what a difference 26 years can make. The setting is Shanghai's financial district of Pudong, dominated by the Oriental Pearl Tower at left, and the new 125-story Shanghai Tower, China's tallest building and the world's second tallest skyscraper, at 632 meters (2,073 ft) high, scheduled to finish by the end of 2014. Shanghai, the largest city by population in the world, has been growing at a rate of about 10 percent a year the past 20 years, and now is home to 23.5 million people -- nearly double what it was back in 1987. This entry is focused on this single photo pairing, with several ways to compare the two.


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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 12:38 PM

It is amazing how quick a city can change in only 26 years. Since this picture was taken in 1987, the city's population has doubled, and is continuing to grow rapidly. Today, this city is one of the largest in the world and has magnificent skyscrapers, one of which is the second tallest in the world. It is obvious globalization hit this mega city very quickly, making it one of the most impressive cities in the world. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:37 PM

Buildings, skyscrapers and urbanization. Why not? This is how the world is and this is what attacks tourists. For Shanghai, they need to be up to par with all the other business and tech savvy countries and cities. This is how they are going to keep their technological business, by building what needs to be built. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:16 PM

unit 7

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Business Languages In Africa

Business Languages In Africa | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The Main Languages of Business in Africa."


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Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 2015 10:46 PM

This map is a simple but powerful one. Africa is the continent that contains the most nations (53), yet it uses only six languages for business. Not surprisingly, all of the languages (with the exception of Arabic) are European in origin. Clearly, the effects of colonialism are still felt around the world in former colonies. The languages that were forced upon various African countries by their colonizers have endured and become the main languages of business in their respective countries. What is just as unfortunate as the roots of colonialism holding fast, if not more so, is the absence of any indigenous languages being used as the language of business in any of the countries of Africa. While using a business language that is spoken by much of the world is surely a matter of practicality and logistics, it is still robbing African countries of their heritage and culture to some degree.

 

This brings up the issue of globalization and how it is constantly at odds with the preservation of culture and tradition. In order for Africa (or any continent or region or country) to function in the modern world, it must be capable of conducting business in a language that is spoken by its business partners. The ability to do business with virtually any person, company, or country in the world is an obviously invaluable one. At the same time, however, it allows for the subtle and gradual erasure of unique culture and traditions. So while it would be ideal for cultural preservation for countries to conduct business in their indigenous languages, it seems to be a necessary evil for smaller and less influential countries to adopt the languages of their more powerful and influential business partners if they wish to survive in today's world. 

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 29, 2015 4:24 PM

The lingering effects of colonialism, so strongly relevant in every aspect of African ways of life, are perhaps most evident in the "lingua franca" of African nations today. With a multitude of different ethnicities and languages in use in every African nation today, the result of the arbitrarily drawn national borders made by European colonizers, necessitates the use of the one language that's commonly spoken across every independent nation- a European tongue. This system, while a necessity in today's world, is a solution that no one is quite happy with. It reminds Africans of all ages of the power still held by their colonizers over their everyday lives, a stark reminder of the horrors of the previous century at every business meeting and every exchange of goods. This harms the national psyche of each nation, as well as undermining the importance and pride Africans deservedly maintain in their own native languages. European-made borders, however, make it difficult to find another, native language that every ethnic group can agree upon. As a result, the European languages are still in use in Africa, and will most likely still be in use for some time to come. It's a system that no one likes but, for the time being, everyone must accept as reality.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 30, 2015 7:26 AM

This map is a great resource in showing the diversity of language in Africa. Of course, this map discounts the many native African languages. It instead focuses on the language of business in the continent. That language, has been influence by the European colonization of Africa. The chosen language of business is often tied to the colonizer of the region. The diversity of language in Africa is staggering to say the least.  

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The Surprising Lessons of the 'Muslim Hipsters' Backlash

The Surprising Lessons of the 'Muslim Hipsters' Backlash | Human Geography | Scoop.it
I made a music video to share my own story as a Muslim woman in America. In doing so, I was expected to share every other Muslim woman's story, too.

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Amanda Morgan's comment, September 12, 2014 2:55 PM
I found this to be interesting because she speaks of trying to get Americans to understand the Muslim identity but yet all I got from the video was materialistic elements. Designer jewelry, watches and Chanel sweaters don't really give insight to the Muslim identity. I understand where she is coming from in trying to make her identity more "mainstream" however, i feel as though "North America" as a whole is so diverse that there isn't a single identity anymore, but a mix of diversity.
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:54 AM

I found this to be interesting because she speaks of trying to get Americans to understand the Muslim identity but yet all I got from the video was materialistic elements. Designer jewelry, watches and Chanel sweaters don't really give insight to the Muslim identity. I understand where she is coming from in trying to make her identity more "mainstream" however, i feel as though "North America" as a whole is so diverse that there isn't a single identity anymore, but a mix of diversity.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, September 21, 2014 8:11 PM

We as humans are scared of other people that are different than us.  Anyone that dresses differently or talks differently or looks different than us are a cause for fear.  This girl was brilliant in taking to social media to prove that she isn't different from us.  She likes the same things as white Americans such as fashion and sports and doesn't want to be scrutinized over the fact that she wears a hijab and has different guidelines when it comes to certain things such as dress.

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Chocolate The Bitter Truth 1 of 5 Child Trafficking BBC Panorama Investigation - YouTube

Chocolate - The Bitter Truth 1 of 5 - Ivory Coast Child Trafficking - BBC Panorama Investigation, recorded 08.05.2010 We spend more on chocolate each year th...
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"bitter truth" is in five parts.  (see the sidebar)

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Slavery in the Chocolate Industry - YouTube

Although slavery is no longer legal there are still millions of people living in slavery today. One place and industry where slaves still exist is the cocoa ...
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Your Contribution to the California Drought

Your Contribution to the California Drought | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The average American consumes more than 300 gallons of California water each week by eating food that was produced there.
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Boko Haram’s Civilian Attacks in Nigeria Intensify

Boko Haram’s Civilian Attacks in Nigeria Intensify | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The militant group has killed more than 200 people in the last week, including attacks in Jos on a popular restaurant and a mosque.
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Transgender Rights, Bangladesh Style

Transgender Rights, Bangladesh Style | Human Geography | Scoop.it
A hijra’s courageous act during a terrorist attack has made the “third” sex visible.
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Video: The World’s Deadliest Place for Kids

Video: The World’s Deadliest Place for Kids | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Nicholas Kristof reports on the rampant corruption in oil-rich Angola, which is depriving children of education and contributing to the highest rate of child mortality in the world.
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Prayer in Various Global Faiths

Prayer in Various Global Faiths | Human Geography | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 20, 2015 12:15 PM

See how people around the world pray...video examples of prayer and the cultural/spiritual significance are shown highlighting Buddhists, Mormons, and Sikhs.  Place is very important component to prayer for many and the 4th example shows how some use a labyrinth as a tool to commune with the divine.


Tags: religion, culture, Christianity, Buddhism.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 1, 2015 9:54 AM

unit 3

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 1, 2015 9:55 AM

unit 3

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An Atlas of Poverty

An Atlas of Poverty | Human Geography | Scoop.it
We think we know what poverty looks like. But how do we accurately account for it? How do we know where to look?
Poverty maps are one place to begin. Technological advances of the past decade—the increased capability to both collect and process improved data—make it possible to reveal the face of the poor in finer detail than ever before. By translating data into the visual accessibility of a map, we can locate poverty more precisely, understand its sources more comprehensively—and attack it more effectively. Such maps can even be used to monitor the results of anti-poverty efforts. Poverty maps can be part of a strong, new foundation for building and tailoring policies and programs, to reach those people that will benefit the most.
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 9, 2014 8:27 PM

This is very revealing

Sieg Holle's curator insight, March 10, 2014 9:10 PM

solutions anyone......

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▶ Countries inside Countries: Bizarre Borders


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Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, May 18, 2014 2:52 PM

Talk about landlocked!  How would you form policy for a country that is completely surrounded by another country?

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 8:02 PM

APHG-U4

Tori Denney's curator insight, May 27, 2015 5:30 PM

nature, meaning, and function of boundaries - The most common boundaries are nation's borders. This video shows many landlocked or mostly surrounded states, that don't decisive as much freedom as states with many neighbors or open borders. These surrounded states value their borders and boundaries, because even if they are smaller or do not have as much freedom, they have their own state that they rule that is all theirs. The function of these borders as boundaries are to mark the edges of their state and to keep other states out.

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Demographic Atlas

Demographic Atlas | Human Geography | Scoop.it
This atlas shows how the population is changing - growing in some parts of the country, while shrinking in others. The maps show the entire United States by county, using data from the U.S. Census Bureau's 2010 Census and Esri. How do things look in your neighborhood?

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For Ukraine, Losing Crimea Might be No Loss

For Ukraine, Losing Crimea Might be No Loss | Human Geography | Scoop.it
By the end of this month, it is likely that Vladimir Putin’s Russia will fully control Ukraine’s Crimean peninsula. And it is clear that he aspires to much more.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 13, 2014 10:27 AM

According to this article, Ukraine will be fine economically with Crimea being pinched off, but Crimea and Russia would suffer from an annexation

Coach Frye's curator insight, March 14, 2014 12:47 PM

Russian control of Crimea, and Vladimir Putin's plans for the future.

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Go West, Young People! And East!

Go West, Young People! And East! | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Every college in America should make it a requirement to study abroad. Why study Spanish in a classroom in Indiana when you could learn it in Bolivia?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 16, 2014 9:23 PM

This NY Times article by Nicholas Kristof highlights of the several reasons why I'm a proponent of study abroad programs as a way to help students to globalize their educational experiences.  At Rhode Island College I'm proud to work on the Shinn Study Abroad Committee  which is dedicated to giving more students the opportunities to make the world their campus. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:01 PM

Studying abroad is an opportunity that when students get it they should take it. Living life in another country is culturally enhancing and can benefit your life in many ways.

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The world map of chocolate (made out of chocolate)

The world map of chocolate (made out of chocolate) | Human Geography | Scoop.it
You may be focussing on chocolate over the weekend - but where does it come from? A global trade analysed. In chocolate
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