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The Original Video of Lilly: The World Map Master

Google this: "Rachael Ray Geography Whiz" if you don't believe what you see. Lilly will also have a clip featured on Leno after the writer's strike hiatus. L...
Devyn Hantgin's insight:
Key geographical skills

Unit 1 ∙ Nature and Perspectives of Geography

This scoop is about a little girl named Lilly that is amazing at geography. She can flawlessly point out countries on a world map. Her young age makes this video very shocking. Lilly's parents ask her where the countries are, and she simply points at them on the map without hesitation. 

This video relates to our class because we recently went over world locations. Our summer reading was about how some people have a gift with geography and maps. Lilly clearly has a gift with maps at a young age. I am afraid she knows more than I do!

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Unit 6: industrialization and economic development

Unit 6: industrialization and economic development | Human Geography | Scoop.it

OPENLANDS PROJECT
CENTER FOR NEIGHBORHOOD TECHNOLOGY


What is Green Infrastructure?


Green infrastructure is the interconnected network of land and water that supports native species, maintains natural and ecological processes, sustains air and water resources, and contributes to the health and quality of life of people and communities.

 

The need to protect the region’s green infrastructure is greater than ever. Rapid changes in land use, increases in non-native species, and other threats imperil the region’s natural heritage. Green infrastructure should serve as the strategic framework for conservation and development so that linkages and key natural areas can be preserved before development occurs.

 

Green infrastructure can range in size from the intimate to the vast, from a small neighborhood garden to Lake Michigan. Each piece has its place in the regional fabric. Understanding the relationship between the pieces is important because it will provide a framework for protecting and restoring natural landscapes.

 

This map uses sub-watershed boundaries for its borders to illustrate how the regional fabric of green infrastructure stretches across state and county lines, ignoring political boundaries.

 

The region’s green infrastructure is characterized by rich natural resources, globally rare ecosystems, and tremendous biological diversity. It also has immense economic value – e.g., wetlands that reduce fl ooding, trees that cool neighborhoods in the summer, and open spaces that absorb rainwater and replenish the aquifer. All provide millions of dollars worth of benefits to the region each year.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Devyn Hantgin's insight:

Sustainable development

this article is about green infrastructure. Don't know what that is? read this article, it will tell you all about it! It is basically just infrastructure that is environmentally friendly and respects nature. 

This relates to our unit because in agriculture we talk about preserving the environment and in cities and suburban land use we talk about how communities are built and designed. 

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Unit 5: Agriculture, food production, and rural land use

Unit 5: Agriculture, food production, and rural land use | Human Geography | Scoop.it

This map shows what America would look like if it followed its watersheds. It's an America designed to use water more efficiently, and reduce state conflicts over water. Think state conflicts over water aren't a big deal? Then you don't know that Georgia, Florida, and Alabama are engaged in a massive battle over their water sources. There's a similar situation in the dry Southwest. Will the states go to war? Almost certainly not--but there must be a better solution.

 

Made by John Lavey, a land use planner at the Sonoran Institute, the map is inspired by an idea from 19th-century adventurer and geologist John Wesley Powell. In 1879, Powell proposed that "as the Western states were brought into the union they be formed around watersheds, rather than arbitrary political boundaries." Powell's map of Western "watershed states" is very different than what we have today.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Devyn Hantgin's insight:

Land use/land cover change: irrigation, desertification, deforestation, wetland destruction, conservation efforts to protect or restore natural land cover, and global impacts

This map shows our country's states based on where they get their water. This visual representation helps us see and better comprehend which states use the most water and where they get it from.

This relates to our unit because it uses specialized maps to represent information. It also shows the irrigation of the united states and how we use our water throughout our country. 

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Unit 7: Cities and urban land use

Unit 7: Cities and urban land use | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The word city may conjure up the image of a dense urban space full of street life and people willing to pack themselves like tinned fish into subway cars for their morning commute. But in the real world, a city is just a set of political boundaries. And often, what's inside...

Via Rob Duke, Jocelyn Stoller
Devyn Hantgin's insight:

Development and character of cities

This graph shows what percentage of the biggest cities in America are suburban. It shows that some cities are basically just giant suburbs. 

This relates to our unit because we are studying suburbs and cities and the patterns about which they were built. 

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Unit 3: Cultural patterns and processes

Unit 3: Cultural patterns and processes | Human Geography | Scoop.it
They were touted as Lebanon's answer to reality TV icons the Kardashians, but the stars of "The Sisters" have been dismissed as not only unrepresentative but even worse -- boring.
In the sleek apartment where their show is filmed, Alice, Nadine and Farah Abdel Aziz teeter around on high heels, in full make-up at all times.
They defend their show as a realistic glimpse into their lives, and a chance to show how smart Lebanese women are.
But Lebanese viewers seem to disagree, criticising the series for focusing on a small sliver of the upper class and failing to provide the whiff of scandal that animates the infamous "Keeping up with the Kardashians" US reality show.
"The Sisters" began in March with much fanfare and local media coverage.
It usually features the slender siblings in Beirut's most expensive restaurants, designer shops, and beauty salons, often with friends, each visit usually documented with a selfie or two.
"We want people to see what Lebanese women are like," says Alice, 26, the trio's self-appointed chief, her tiny figure draped in a bright blue cut-off top and dazzling jewelry.
And the sisters do represent a segment of Lebanon's most ostentatious wives and daughters, who enjoy similarly extravagant excursions and designer styles.
But they say they still respect the Middle East's conservative values, which rule out the discussions of body parts, boyfriends and sex that spice up the Kardashians' hit series.
"They live in a certain environment, and we live in a certain environment. Their lifestyle is really different," Farah, 22, said of the Kardashians.
Lebanon, a multi-confessional country of four million, is considered among the most liberal in the Arab world with women generally free to wear revealing attire and alcohol widely available.
But parts of Lebanese society remain deeply conservative, and female representation in politics is minimal: only four of Lebanon's 128 members of parliament are women.
- 'We aren't perfect' -
Alice curates the "Style in Beirut" Instagram page, where she posts photos of glamorous outfits to nearly 200,000 followers.
Nadine, 23, is a professional model and is often seen exercising, while Farah, a recent graduate, is working towards becoming a news anchor with the help of her life coach.
"Do I look good? Does the lighting look good on me?" Farah asks Nadine in an impromptu photo shoot in Beirut's downtown, carrying their fluffy white puppy, Stella.
"We want to show people that we aren't perfect," Alice explains in accented English.
"The message isn't just to be beautiful, to go out, fashion, and that's it... People can see how smart Lebanese women are, how they don't have to rely on their parents," she insists.
But that claim is rejected by many Lebanese women, who say the show ignores educated, hardworking, and down-to-earth women.
In the show's first episode, Nadine is late to pick up an exasperated Alice from the airport because her car runs out of petrol.
"Whenever we have any problems, Daddy is always there to fix them for us," Nadine says to the camera, asking her father to send their driver to collect her.
That has frustrated Lebanese activists who are eager to see more representative depictions of the country's women in the media.
"We try to fight this stereotype picture of Lebanese women, and they always manage through shows and movies to keep showing it," says Reem Kaedbey, 27, an activist and researcher on governance.
"The majority of Lebanese women can't afford this lifestyle."
- 'It's an insult' -
"It's an insult to everything women have tried to accomplish during recent Lebanese history," says Sareen Akharjalian, a programmer and cartoonist who mocked the sisters on her website.
With many Lebanese women holding challenging jobs, "this show mocks our entire being," she said.
The Abdel Aziz sisters are unfazed by the criticism and say upcoming episodes will feature new career developments.
Already, Farah has tried her hand at TV presenting, while Alice is preparing to launch a fashion line for dogs.
Ultimately though, the show's undoing appears to have been the lack of scandal that is central to the success of "Keeping up the Kardashians", which focuses on the lives of sisters Kourtney, Kim and Khloe, and is now in its 10th season.
Kaedbey for example admits the Kardashians are a "guilty pleasure" for her, but says "The Sisters" is boring by comparison, plagued by "bad acting".
The station that airs "The Sisters" did not respond to requests for viewer figures, but online views on YouTube have gone from 242,000 for its first episode to just 18,000 for its ninth.
"Being attractive helps, but it's not what keeps people on the air... We're left with story lines that can't really go in depth," says May Farah, a media professor at the American University of Beirut.
"If we can't have that, if we just have them talking about fashion, is it really going to captivate an audience?"

Via Warren David
Devyn Hantgin's insight:

Popular and folk culture

This article is about a reality TV show in Lebanon similar to the American show "the Kardashians". "The Sisters" is about three Lebanese women who walk around in heels and full makeup all the time. It is supposed to be a realistic look into their lives, but the show is not doing well because viewers think it is highly unrealistic and only represents the highest upper class.

This relates to our unit because reality television is an example of popular culture and it is spreading to other countries. The Kardashians are a big deal in American media and pop culture and now other countries are trying to develope their own versions.  

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Unit 3: Cultural patterns and processes

Unit 3: Cultural patterns and processes | Human Geography | Scoop.it
It is 2014 and we live in a rapidly globalizing world. Unfortunately, that is not always apparent from the technology press, which focuses primarily on developments in the US. That is not meant as a slight against others who write about technology -- it is just the reality. But thanks to our global and interconnected […]

Via midem, Christopher Coleman
Devyn Hantgin's insight:

This article includes a graph that shows the international availability of entertainment services. It is an interesting graph because iTunes is more available than google. This is extremely interesting to see because we use the internet all the time. 

Globalization and the effects of technology on cultures is what i learned from this article. It clearly shows the globalization of technology. 

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Unit 2:Major Historical Migrations


Via Tyler Anson
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Major Historical Migrations

This video is about one of the first major historical migrations of the early African people to different parts of the world. They moved mostly because of climate. This video gives explanations for the migration and different routs taken. 

This is relevant to our unit because we are studying major migrations and migratory patterns and paths. This video sums up the first major migration in a 5 minute video. It is important to see where one of the first migrations happened and why.  

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Tyler Anson's curator insight, March 22, 2015 11:04 AM

This video shows how the Africans of long ago (in the times of one of the Ice Ages) left Africa completely and migrated around the world. Referencing the article put out by the Smithsonian, this migration of homo sapiens is why we are the dominant and last remaining "human" race left on this Earth. 

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Unit 6: Industrialization and economic development

Unit 6: Industrialization and economic development | Human Geography | Scoop.it
12 Jan 2015

It is a pleasure to address the Women’s International Forum this afternoon. I thank the President of the Forum, Sahar Baassiri Salam, for her kind introduction, and the previous President, Nareumon Sinhaseni , for extending the original invitation to me.

We are at the beginning of a very important year for gender equality and women’s empowerment. This year marks important milestones on two landmark, global agendas on gender equality: the twentieth anniversary of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, and the fifteenth anniversary of Security Council Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace, and Security. The UN will review progress on implementing both agendas this year.

As well, in September, the General Assembly is due to adopt a new sustainable development agenda, replacing the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) which run their course at the end of this year. Gender equality and women’s empowerment will be crucial to achieving this new agenda, as they were for making progress on the MDGs.

These are issues of great personal importance to me. I consider myself fortunate to have been born into the post-war baby boom generation in New Zealand, where the doors of education, health care, and opportunity were wide open to me, and where, as a woman, I was able to pursue a career of my choice, and meet my professional aspirations.

That is not to say that the road was always easy. Having been the first woman elected as Prime Minister of my country, and before that the first to hold the position of Leader of the Opposition, I am very well acquainted with the challenges which women face when entering hitherto male-dominated domains. Making the path to leadership easier for other women across all sectors is a top priority for me.

I believe it is important for women who do reach the top despite the odds to help build an overall environment in which all women can thrive. For me in New Zealand, that meant leading a government which opened up choices for women through policies like free early childhood care and education for twenty hours each week – creating opportunity for children, and also for women to have a genuine choice to enter the paid workforce if they wished; entitlement to paid parental leave when babies were born; expanded annual leave; and more financial support for tertiary education – on average women earn less across their lifetimes than do men, which means that student debt can be particularly burdensome for women. My government tackled that by providing “no interest” student loans for all students who stayed in New Zealand.

In my remarks today, I will comment further on why gender equality and women’s empowerment matter, and highlight progress made and challenges remaining. I will share some examples of how UNDP integrates gender equality and women’s empowerment into its work. I will conclude with a few reflections on the process now underway towards the new, post-2015 sustainable development agenda and the importance of prioritizing gender in that agenda.

Why gender equality matters

Gender equality matters in and of itself. It is a basic human right for women to enjoy full legal equality and equality of opportunity, and for girls born today, in any country, to have the same life prospects as their male counterparts.

But, as Hillary Clinton and others have observed, gender equality is not only the right thing to do, it’s also the smart thing to do. Basic arithmetic tells us that if all members of society are equally empowered to contribute, the sum of their efforts will be far greater than if whole groups, like women, do not enjoy equal opportunity.

As well, investments made in opportunities and services for women and girls are great multipliers of development progress. The benefits to child and maternal health – MDGs 4 and 5, respectively – are very clear. Children born to women with some formal education are more likely to survive to their fifth birthday, receive adequate nutrition, and be immunized and enrolled in school. Access to sexual and reproductive health services enables women to plan their families and expand their opportunities, and it also helps reduce maternal and child mortality.

Access to midwives and/or other skilled birth attendants is crucial to ensuring that women can access sexual and reproductive health services. As Minister of Health in my country 25 years ago, I was responsible for the passage of new legislation providing for the independent and autonomous practice of midwifery. I strongly believe that empowered midwives play a critical role in improving maternal health.

The economic benefits for families and for whole nations of empowering women are clear too. Ensuring that women farmers have equal access to agricultural resources boosts women’s incomes and status, and has a positive impact on a country’s agricultural sectors and food security. According to a report by the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization, if women had the same access to productive resources as men, they could increase yields on their farms by twenty to thirty per cent. That could raise total agricultural output in developing countries by 2.5 to four per cent per annum, and reduce the number of hungry people in the world by twelve to seventeen per cent.

Women in many countries still have unequal access to credit and other financial services, such as savings, digital payment methods, and insurance – all critical inputs to livelihoods. Women with equal rights as basic as being able to own and inherit land and property, access credit, and open bank accounts can play an even greater role in the development of their societies.

UN Member States have affirmed time and time again the importance of gender equality and their commitment to achieving it. Gender equality is affirmed across a number of UN instruments, conventions and decisions, including the Universal Declaration on Human Rights, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women, the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, and the Millennium Declaration. These agreements provide the foundation for the support which the UN system provides to countries on achieving gender equality and empowering women.

Progress and challenges on gender equality

So how is the world doing on its commitments to gender equality?

There has been progress in some important areas, but it is slow and uneven.

On average around the world, gender parity in primary education has been achieved. Most children now enrol in primary schooling, although completion rates and the quality of education are not high across all countries.

While the rate of maternal mortality has dropped in the last two decades, approximately 800 women continue to die every day from preventable causes related to pregnancy and childbirth. It is one of the MDG targets on which the least progress has been made – a sad commentary on the priority which tackling these tragedies has had.

Sexual and gender-based violence sadly continues in every country of the world – developed and developing. It has been seen to reach horrific levels where there is war and conflict. Then, in these traumatized and destabilized societies, the war or conflict may not end for women when a peace settlement is reached, with the incidence of rape and other sexual and gender-based violence often remaining high.

More women than ever before are participating in the work force, but generally women earn less than men. Women’s earnings fell short of men’s by 23 per cent from 2008 to 2009. This represented only a small improvement since 1995, when women’s earnings were 26 per cent less than those of men. At this rate, according to the International Labor Organization, it would take 75 years to achieve equal pay for work of equal value.

Around half of all working women have jobs which lack security and benefits. Globally, more women than men have such jobs. The disparity is much larger in certain regions; for example, in North Africa, 23 per cent more women have insecure jobs than do men, and in the Middle East and sub-Saharan Africa, the difference is about fifteen per cent. Following the global financial crisis of 2008, women suffered almost two-thirds of the total job losses - despite the fact that they comprised less than one-third of the actual labor force.

In rich and poor countries alike, women carry a disproportionate burden of unpaid care work – looking after children; caring for elderly, sick, and disabled family members; obtaining and preparing food; and, particularly among poorer, rural households, collecting and carrying water and wood for fuel.

UNDP’s support to gender equality and women’s empowerment

UNDP is very committed to supporting countries to advance gender equality and women’s empowerment, and we do so in a number of ways.

Gender equality is integral to our work on democratic governance, a key part of which is to support countries to ensure that women are included in political processes. We do this by partnering with constitutional commissions, governments, parliaments, and civil society. In Tunisia, which adopted a groundbreaking constitutional provision last year on gender equality, UNDP assisted the Constitutional Assembly to engage civil society around a range of constitutional themes, including gender equality.

In Libya, UNDP has been working with partners across political parties who want to advance equal rights for women, and has supported them to articulate what they would like to see included in the new constitution. Issues like citizenship being able to be inherited equally from mothers and fathers, and the upholding of international conventions and human rights mechanisms protecting women’s rights, are being raised by our Libyan partners. We have supported many other countries to legislate for and implement the international commitments on women’s rights which they have made.

Addressing gender-based violence has been a particular feature of our work – we have supported more than one hundred projects around the world in this area with total funding exceeding USD$300 million. As well as supporting the drafting and adoption of laws on gender-based violence, we support their implementation by working closely with police officers, judges, court administrators, and civil society. I received very positive feedback on this aspect of our work in Iraq from women’s organizations when I visited there.

Another practical example: in Sierra Leone we have supported regular sittings of 'Saturday Courts', which managed to eliminate a backlog of cases on sexual and gender-based violence, ensuring more speedy delivery of justice for survivors.

As the fifteenth anniversary of Security Council Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace, and Security is marked this year, UNDP, along with other UN agencies, is taking a fresh look at how we support women to participate fully in building peace and security, and in helping their countries recover from crises.

Around the world, UNDP has worked to promote women’s participation in peace processes. For example, we have supported the networking of over two thousand women community leaders across the Asia Pacific region who are actively engaged in mediation processes in their localities. We host an annual award celebration to recognize these women in partnership with N-Peace, a multi-country network of peace advocates in Asia which supports women’s leadership for conflict prevention, resolution, and peacebuilding.

While the proportion of women in national parliaments has grown, women still comprise only 21.9 per cent of the world’s parliamentarians – a level well below parity. In some regions, the average is much lower, and some countries still have no elected women members of Parliament.

Time and again, we have seen how a critical mass of women decision-makers makes a difference in bringing forward issues which previously went unaddressed. In 2006, Rwanda passed a far-reaching law to combat gender-based violence – I am sure it is no coincidence that Rwanda had the highest proportion of women parliamentarians in the world at that time at 49 per cent. Today, the proportion of women parliamentarians is even higher at 63.8 per cent – and is still the highest in the world.

Making progress for women can be accelerated when women have that critical mass of seats at decision-making tables. Where women are out of sight, they are out of mind. In my own experience, those women participants also need to be determined to make a difference for women. At UNDP, we support women’s leadership and participation, particularly in political institutions and public administration.

In El Salvador, UNDP supported the women’s group in Parliament to design a quota law which required a minimum of thirty per cent of seats to go to women. The law was subsequently adopted two years ago. We have worked on legislation for parliamentary quotas in a number of other countries too.

We also work in practical ways around the world to support women’s economic empowerment, and to ensure that women can take advantage of programmes for micro-entrepreneurs. In The Gambia, for example, we supported co-operatives of women who harvest oysters and cockles. Through the co-operatives women learn about the sustainable management of these fisheries and have been able to boost their incomes. From Colombia to Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Egypt, and beyond, I read of initiatives we are involved with to ensure that women have the skills and knowledge to lift their incomes.

Prospects for gender in the post-2015 sustainable development agenda

2015 is a big year for global development – and it must be a big year for gender equality, too. The current global development agenda – the MDGs – will come to an end, and it is hoped that at the General Assembly a new sustainable development agenda will be adopted in September.

The emerging post-2015 agenda can be bolder and transformational. There is broad agreement that it should be a universal agenda – applying to all countries. This recognizes that development is not just something which happens somewhere else to other people. Developed countries have substantial development challenges too, as I know well from leading one for nine years. This new development agenda must be bold and transformational for women too.

Since late 2012, UNDP and the broader UN development system have reached out to the world’s citizens for input into the post-2015 agenda, supporting large-scale consultations through 88 national dialogues, eleven major thematic consultations, including one on inequalities, and an ambitious social media platform.

The worldwide survey, MY World, has had an especially wide reach: so far more than seven million people, about half of whom are women, have participated by voting on their priorities for the new agenda. Over 2.2 million people put “equality between men and women” in their top six priorities –alongside better education, health care, jobs honest and responsive government, and affordable and nutritious food.

The Open Working Group on Sustainable Development Goals, consisting of seventy governments and drawing on technical inputs from the UN system and civil society, has proposed seventeen goals and 169 targets. The proposal builds on the legacy of the MDGs with goals on poverty and hunger eradication, health, education, gender equality, and environment, but also broadens the scope with goals on infrastructure, energy, peaceful and inclusive societies, and reductions in inequalities. The agenda would be applicable to all countries, and aims to shift the world towards sustainable consumption and production.

The UN Secretary General’s recent Post-2015 Synthesis Report, “The Road to Dignity by 2030,” welcomes the Open Working Group’s proposal and provides an integrated set of six essential elements to help frame and reinforce the sustainable development agenda. These six elements are dignity, people, prosperity, planet, justice, and partnership.

The post-2015 agenda is an enormous opportunity to finish the unfinished business of the MDGs and accelerate inclusive and sustainable development for all – girls and boys, women and men. Through our support to Member States and their partners, UNDP is committed to doing its part to deliver on an ambitious agenda which will improve the lives of people everywhere.

Via Dr Lendy Spires
Devyn Hantgin's insight:

Gender Inequality

This article reviews some of Helen Clark's views as a women's rights activist. She believes that gender inequality is a huge deal worldwide that needs to be resolved. Her main focus in 2015 is to continue working on the World Development Goals, but to focus on the gender equality part.

This ties into our unit because Gender inequality is a big deal in industrialization and economic development in countries around the world. We also performed a model UN simulation about the WDGs so we know that one of those goals is gender equality and helping women around the world gain more rights than they have now.   

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Unit 1: Geography's nature and perspectives

Unit 1: Geography's nature and perspectives | Human Geography | Scoop.it

Displayed is a map originally produced by Derek Watkins.  This map is a fantastic combination of physical and cultural geography.  While most flowing bodies of water will be called rivers or streams, the lesser used terms (brook, fork, bayou, run, arroyo, etc.) show a striking regionalization of toponym regions.  What do these patterns indicate?  Why are in those toponyms found in those particular places? 


Via Seth Dixon
Devyn Hantgin's insight:

How to define regions and evaluate the regionalization process

This maps shows the different names to describe a river. The colors show regions based on what they call the body of water. Language is a great way to separate a population into regions.

This relates to our unit of study because we talk about regionalization and the different ways populations are divided into regions. When we look at the USA we tend to see patterns between the North and the South and the way they name things differently. 

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cookiesrgreat's comment, February 2, 2012 5:10 PM
this is one of my favorite maps. intertwines language, geography, communications and history into one piece
cookiesrgreat's comment, February 2, 2012 5:12 PM
This is one of my favorite maps. Combines geography, language and history
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:23 PM

unit 3

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Unit 1: Geography's nature and perspectives

Unit 1: Geography's nature and perspectives | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The body speaks volumes. But what it says depends on the culture you're in.

 

Tags: culture, infographic, worldwide.


Via Seth Dixon
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How to understand and interpret the implications of associations among phenomena in places

This article shows different gestures and describes the meaning of each. However, the meaning of each gesture depends on where you are in the world. Different places determine if a gesture is appropriate or inappropriate. 

This relates to our unit because it is about the behaviors of people depending on where they live in the world. This article teaches people about the behaviors of others and helps us understand the differences in cultures based on the region of the the world they live in. 

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Gaëlle Solal's curator insight, April 1, 2015 12:58 PM

ça vous en bouche un coin?!

 

Payton Sidney Dinwiddie 's curator insight, April 14, 2015 6:00 PM

This shows the costums that several other Countries use in north America we cross our legs but in Countries Like Asia disrespectful. In America we view blowing or Noise is normal in Japan that Considered rude

Roman M's curator insight, April 16, 2015 12:17 PM

This article shows the different customs on gestures or body language in the world. What we might do is disrespectful in another country. For example, even some as simple as crossing your legs while sitting is common in North America and some European countries. However, it is viewed disrespectful in Asia and the Middle East.

RM

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Unit 1: Geography's nature and perspective

The world is becoming more and more interconnected. Globalization changes how people consume, work and live almost everywhere on the world. Today, many economic, political, cultural or ecological relationships are not explainable from a national perspective. At the same time, a controversial debate about the consequences of globalization has begun.

 

Questions to ponder: What are the driving forces behind globalization? What areas are most impacted by globalization?  How does globalization benefit some, and adversely impact others? Why?

 

Tags: Globalization, economic, industry, NGOs, political, scale, unit 6 industry.


Via Seth Dixon
Devyn Hantgin's insight:

globalization

This video describes and really breaks down globalization. The video talks about how some countries benefit and some countries don't benefit from globalization. The video also separates globalization into three parts: economic, politics, and culture. It goes over the huge role that technology plays in globalization and covers it well.

This relates to our unit, because globalization is a huge factor in human geography as a whole. It is one of the main factors why our cultures are beginning to intertwine and have things in common.     

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Sheyna Vargas's comment, September 10, 2012 1:16 PM
After watching this video, it is becoming clear that Globalization isn't just one-sided. While making it easier to connect with people all around the world and lowering costs for businesses, it is also causing harm to less developed countries. The question that pops into my head is, "Does the ends justify the means?" One could argue either point.
First, Globalization has made the world a "smaller" place. Not only is it easier to communicate with one another on different sides of the world but it’s also easier and cheaper to transport goods across nations and bodies of water. These are obviously benefits to both the developed countries and lesser developed countries in getting goods in timely fashions and producing jobs in both areas. Globalization also creates competition amongst developing nations to learn or advance in new skills to bring and/or keep jobs in their country/area.
On the other hand, Globalization is also wreaking havoc on cultural diversity around the global with Western music, food, and products becoming more available. Western culture is basically looked upon as the “money making” culture. Globalization, by creating competition is also harming local business in newly developing countries. This drives the prices down for the local businesses and makes them work for less.
Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, May 3, 2013 11:39 AM

Globalización Globalization

Altaira Wallquist's curator insight, March 18, 2015 4:47 PM

This article goes in depth to define and describe globalization.  It discusses globalization  through an economical, political, and cultural standpoint.

 

This connects to Unit 1 in that it discusses globalization and things from a global perspective. It all discusses the society we live in today.

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The Original Video of Lilly: The World Map Master

Google this: "Rachael Ray Geography Whiz" if you don't believe what you see. Lilly will also have a clip featured on Leno after the writer's strike hiatus. L...
Devyn Hantgin's insight:
Key geographical skills

Unit 1 ∙ Nature and Perspectives of Geography

This scoop is about a little girl named Lilly that is amazing at geography. She can flawlessly point out countries on a world map. Her young age makes this video very shocking. Lilly's parents ask her where the countries are, and she simply points at them on the map without hesitation. 

This video relates to our class because we recently went over world locations. Our summer reading was about how some people have a gift with geography and maps. Lilly clearly has a gift with maps at a young age. I am afraid she knows more than I do!

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Unit 4: political organization of space

Unit 4: political organization of space | Human Geography | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON—Urging calm after citizens awoke to find the country’s political boundaries had disappeared completely, authorities announced Thursday that a devastating gerrymandering blunder had left the United States devoid of any district, stat...

Via Seth Dixon, planwithdan
Devyn Hantgin's insight:

Electoral geography: redistricting and gerrymandering

This article states that gerrymandering left our nation without any borders whatsoever. That by dividing our country, we have created a nation without borders. 

This relates to our unit because we are learning about gerrymandering and the effects of redistricting. This article discusses both gerrymandering and the effects on our country. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 25, 2015 2:28 PM

The Onion always delivers!! 

planwithdan's curator insight, March 27, 2015 1:17 PM

Maybe the local indigenous groups could help with the redrawing of a nation :o)

Quentin Sylvester's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:32 AM

This satirical article shows how ridiculous border re-drawing and local politics are by over exaggerating the effects of gerrymandering - showing how one district caused all US borders to disappear. This also pokes fun at how this is all done not for the sake of the people, but for personal political gain, another issue in American politics.

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Unit 7: cities and urban land use

Unit 7: cities and urban land use | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Over the last few years we’ve seen more and more maps that use hexagons.  They have become “cool”.  Why is that?  Well, hexagons and other regularly shaped features allow you to normalize geography for thematic mapping rather than be constrained to using irregular shaped polygons created from a political process (for example, county boundaries, census tracts, zip codes, etc.).  And this is VERY useful because of the massive disparity in some of these shapes.

Via Fernando Gil
Devyn Hantgin's insight:

Christaller's central place theory

This article is about how when we make maps we tend to use hexagons more and more. The basis of maps is just a bunch of hexagons and why that is.

This article reminded me of the Central Place Theory that we learned about in unit 7. The central place theory uses hexagons to explain the size and spacing of cities to sell goods. Hexagons are the polygons of choice because there is no overlap. 

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Unit 4: political organization of space

Unit 4: political organization of space | Human Geography | Scoop.it

The conflict over Western Sahara dates back to 1975, when, following the death of long-time ruler Francisco Franco, Spain ended its colonial rule of the territory. Spain ceded control of the territory to a joint administration by Morocco and Mauritania, but the Polisario Front - the liberation movement of the indigenous Saharawi people - refused to accept the arrangement, and launched attacks on garrisons manned by soldiers from both countries.  Morocco insists that the Western Sahara is part of its historical patrimony, and is unwilling to go beyond offering the Saharawi a limited local autonomy in what Morocco describes as the kingdom's "southern provinces."

 

Tags: borders, political, territoriality, Morocco.


Via Seth Dixon
Devyn Hantgin's insight:

Territorial dimensions of politics

This article is about a boundary dispute between Moroccan people and polish people. 

This relates to our unit because they are using British court to settle their dispute about boundaries. 

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Campbell Ingraham's curator insight, March 23, 2015 11:05 AM

This conflict represents the changes and challenges to political-territorial arrangements, because Over the course of 40 years, this territory has been greatly disputed by different states. An arrangement to have Morocco and Mauritania both control the Western Sahara only lasted 4 years, because Western Sahara valued their own sovereignty and fought back. The conflict still has not been settled, and changes could occur in the upcoming years.

Gabby cotton's curator insight, March 24, 2015 12:30 AM

Unit 5: Agriculture

The Uk is trying to label all products coming in from the Western Sahara. This is an effort to weaken Morocco's claim of the territory. The territory is highly disputed, and many products from that area say there from Morocco and not Western Sahara.


This relates to unit 5 because not only is it talking about growing and farming, but it is also talking about the area in which the crops come from. It also relates to unit 4 as the territory is highly disputed and the UK refuses to  label the crops as 'Moroccan'

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Unit 3: Cultural patterns and processes

Unit 3: Cultural patterns and processes | Human Geography | Scoop.it

Get ready for etiquette books on when it's OK to reboot your sinuses in public, and the teenager-ization of senior citizens. Here are some predictions from the experts on how human culture will transform over the next hundred years.

Devyn Hantgin's insight:

Cultural differences and regional patterns

This article is a prediction from scientists about what they think human culture will be like in 100 years. Our culture is constantly evolving and changing, so this article is interesting to see what some scientists guess its going to look like. 

This article relates to our unit because it teaches about how our own culture is different from itself. With time, the same culture could look completely different due to environmental changes. 

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Unit 3: Cultural patterns and processes

Unit 3: Cultural patterns and processes | Human Geography | Scoop.it

“Whatever you can rightly say about India, the opposite is also true.”
—Amartya Sen

I am torn about how to teach these two ideas about cultures and societies all around the world:

People and cultures are different all over the world.People and cultures are the same all over the world.


These points may seem like a contradiction, but when put into proper context they teach important truths about culture. There is great richness and diversity to the languages, religions, food systems and other customs around the world. The world is often referred to as a great tapestry or mosaic, where the details are integral parts of making a much greater, beautiful work of art. People around the world are all different.

And yet, despite the cultural differences, most students can identify common societal traits that are a part of the human experience. Although English and Igbo (a language used in West Africa) sound radically different, they are both used to share messages of love and friendship on the one hand, and to debate and deceive on the other. Societies all around the world have people who are working to feed their families, finding new ways to make money, are excited to get new clothes, and just want to be happy in their own community. People around the world are all the same.

Teaching these ideas in tandem helps students appreciate the diversity of cultures in the world and also see the common threads of humanity.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Devyn Hantgin's insight:

Cultural traits

This article is about how cultural acceptance needs to be taught all over the world. It focuses on teaching 2 ideas: that all people and cultures are different, and that all people and cultures are the same. We are all different, but share very similar traits.

This is relevant to our unit because we all need to be a little more  accepting of others and their cultures. Just because it is different, doesn't mean its weird.  Plus, we can learn a lot from each other and different cultures. 

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Madison & Morgan's curator insight, April 8, 2015 1:28 PM

This article represents Afirca's religion. It shows examples of their religion impacting their daily life such as what they wear and how they talk. Also, it tells about how seriously people take their religious beliefs.

Jack and Kaden's curator insight, April 8, 2015 5:14 PM

Africa Religion: This article talks about not steryotyping in Africa and other regions of the world. We have covered this topic before and it's a reoccuring thing in the world. This is somethig many people hope will stop. 

Mae Hughes/Lauryn Macias's curator insight, April 9, 2015 2:29 AM

The world today is very diverse just like Africa, however if you look close enough you can see the common threads of humanity. Cultures around the world are different but share many common traits. We all have struggled as well as succeeded but most if all we all just want to find happiness in our own comunity. we chose this article for religion because religion is a trait  that's shared between lots of different societies. 

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Unit 2: population and migration

Unit 2: population and migration | Human Geography | Scoop.it
In several previous posts we have looked at specific migration channels connecting Mexico to the USA: From Morelos to Minnesota; case study of a migrant...

 

An excellent way to show examples of chain migration and the gravity model...students will understand the concepts with concretes examples. These interactive maps have crisp geo-visualizations of the migratory flows.


Via Seth Dixon
Devyn Hantgin's insight:

Migration

This map show the most popular migratory flows of migration from Mexico to the US. 

This ties into our unit about migration because many Mexicans migrate to the US every year. This map shows the patterns and paths of the migration. 

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Jason Schneider's curator insight, February 3, 2015 4:09 PM

When it comes to ethnic groups in the United States, many of the hispanic/mexican ancestors occur in the southwestern area of the United States. That's obviously because Mexico is southwest of the United States. When it comes to emigrating from Mexico, individuals immigrate to the United States (mostly southwest of the United States) so they can live a different, hopefully better economy. Plus, they try to escape the gang violence and drug violence in Mexico.

Alexa Earl's curator insight, March 14, 2015 1:05 PM

This is a good representation of chain migration.

Lindsay Hoyt's curator insight, June 26, 11:32 PM

Gives a visual of migration trends and can connect to current events or historical events.

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Unit 2: population and migration

Unit 2: population and migration | Human Geography | Scoop.it
This data visualization from the U.S. Census Bureau uses an age-sex pyramid to show a century of population change in the age and sex composition of the nation's population. http://go.usa.gov/D8rA (From a pyramid to a blob: Watch U.S.

Via AnalyticsInnovations
Devyn Hantgin's insight:

composition: age and sex

This link will show you a united states population pyramid from the 1900s all the way to 2000. Its really cool and helpful to see the population of our nation grow before your eyes.

This ties into our unit because we are learning a lot about population pyramids and what causes different shapes and dips within the pyramid. This is a population pyramid that changes over time and right before your eyes.  

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Unit 1: Geography's nature and perspective

Unit 1: Geography's nature and perspective | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Only 2% of Australia's population lives in the yellow area. "


Via Seth Dixon, Lona Pradeep Parad
Devyn Hantgin's insight:

How to recognize and interpret at different scales the relationships among patterns and processes

This map shows how little of a population lives in the majority of Australia. This map was made to show the relationship of population to coastal areas. The yellow area is not highly populated because it is very hot and dry. 

This relates to the unit because it is a map showing the relationship between population and coastline areas. In our class we learn to look at maps and data and find patterns and relationships within the information given. 

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Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 10, 2015 7:28 PM

The yellow represents desert and with no rainfall what are you going to grow. the white area is the area that gets plenty of rain, good farmland for raising livestock, excellent natural harbors and resources. the yellow upper part probably is not desert but I bet its cold up there.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:08 PM

this seems like the same sort of situation that Egypt has, it seems like a good sized area but the large deserts make most of it uninhabitable, the country's livable space is much less than you would think.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:17 PM
What we have here is a representation of the desert area that only 2% of the population lives in, this is because to sustain life, you need high amounts of water to grow food which will never happen here and then the white being the mainly inhabited areas. These areas are mainly inhabited because of sufficient rainfall which makes agriculture good and good enough to sustain populations of people.
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Unit 1: Geography's nature and perspectives

Unit 1: Geography's nature and perspectives | Human Geography | Scoop.it

Hand-in-hand with ICITE is a growing focus on more predictive intelligence. It’s called activity-based intelligence—akin to combing through vast amounts of geospatial data, including video, satellite imagery and other sensor data to look for patterns. It stands in contrast to the traditional target-based methods of intelligence pioneered, for example, by the CIA.

Devyn Hantgin's insight:

How to use and think about maps and geospatial data

This article is about "The quiet rise of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency". This group of people uses interactive mapping and satellite imagery to solve many world problems. "The NGA's intelligence-gathering has played a key role in every major world crisis since the raid on Osama bin Laden in 2011." The rise of this intelligence group is a helpful tool is future world problems. 

This article is relevant to our unit because this fairly new intelligence group is using their knowledge of maps and satellite technology to locate criminals and solve world problems. THEY ARE USING MAPS to do an incredibly important job. Our unit is about maps and locating things spatially and  this group of people are the experts and I'm glad people are starting to recognize the importance of their jobs. 

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Unit 1: Geography's nature and perspectives

Unit 1: Geography's nature and perspectives | Human Geography | Scoop.it

This article has a compilation of videos that can be used to at the beginning of the school year to show the importance of geography, spatial thinking and geo-literacy.

 

This first video is an excellent promotional video for geography as a whole, but the AP Human Geography course specifically.  For more from this great Florida teacher, visit his course website which has some incredible resources.

 

Click headline to access all of the Geography Education videos--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Devyn Hantgin's insight:

Geography as a field of inquiry

This article has a variety of videos that interest people in human geography. The videos range from an APHUG trailer to Jay Leno testing peoples' lack of geography skills. Each video is very intriguing and encourages people to learn more about geography.

This relates to our unit because it encourages people to take this class. These videos encourage people to learn more about geography and cultures around the world. There is so much to learn and most Americans are so naive to the importance of geography.  

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