AP HUMAN GEOGRAPH...
Follow
Find tag "tourism"
4.3K views | +7 today
AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Create Your Own Map

Create Your Own Map | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Create a color-coded Visited States Map, showing off your road travel in the United States and Canada."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 8, 2013 3:12 AM

create your own map is interesing because it allows you to visualize and share with others your own journey around the country in terms of residence and visits being in seperate colors. Compared to the size of the country I myself have only been to very few states. I have yet to go to Alaska, Hawaii, the Midwest parts, and much of the Western part of the country. I am convinced that extensive travel is something i will accomplish in the yeard ahead. For the professor himself he still has several more states to visit. It is propbable that he will visit many more in the years to come

Charles Adami's curator insight, November 18, 2013 9:52 PM

Students color code states involved in expedition. Louisiana Purchase , and US circa 1803.

Cam E's curator insight, January 28, 12:40 PM

I took the liberty of using this site which was linked on my Professor's page to create my own map of travels within the United States! Green represents states which I've spent many nights, amber for states which I briefly passed through, and red for states I've never been to at all. I didn't include the map for Canada as well, but I've been to Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Ontario primarily. I'm very into the idea of travel and intend to visit as many places as I can in my lifetime, but I have focused much of my journeys for the future into foreign countries. This map gave me the hint that I might want to focus homeward a bit more.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Wedding, Gangnam Style: S. Korea attracts affluent Chinese

Wedding, Gangnam Style: S. Korea attracts affluent Chinese | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

South Korea's tourism ministry estimates that more than 2.5 million Chinese visitors spent an average of $2,150 per person in 2012, more than any other nationality. That's helping companies such as iWedding, which is the largest of the South Korean wedding planners hosting Chinese tourists, to flourish.

 

"Chinese look up to South Korea for its sophisticated urban culture, style and beauty," said Song Sung-uk, professor of South Korean pop culture studies at the Catholic University of Korea in Seoul. "Rather than visiting traditional palaces or shopping for antiques, they would rather go to Gangnam to experience state-of-the-art shopping malls."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 15, 2013 9:46 PM

Tags: popular culture, South Korea, East AsiaChina, tourism.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 17, 2013 1:28 PM

Seems that the Chiese are skipping over their ally to head to South Korea for a better time.  Seems that international isolation really does have an effect on the domestic life, and toursim, in North Korea.  They really also want to just go shopping somewhere new and modern and see what just might be avaliable in their neighbor to the south.  Guess this time they won't be invading South Korea with an army, as in 1950, but with tourists.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 1:23 PM

I found this article very interesting because it seems so elegant for this new bride to have pictures takend and she has this new place where her and her husband are going to be getting married and then the article talks about where the best place is to go when these celebrations are happening. US Today talks about how it is not an elegant hillside or an ancient monument or even ruins that the newlyweds swarm to but the tony Seoul district made globally famous by South Korean rapper PSY's "Gangnam Style." "Helping shape that image is the popularity of South Korean cosmetics and fashion and the many South Korean stars whose looks are widely copied in China."

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Countries that are most and least welcoming to foreigners

Countries that are most and least welcoming to foreigners | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Blue countries are more welcoming, red countries less. Where does yours rank?

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Thomas D's comment, May 6, 2013 10:29 AM
I think this map of least and most welcoming countries to tourist is very interesting. I look at this through the American point of view and see that countries like Russia, Iran and Pakistan who are among the least welcoming states. These are all countries that we have had conflicts with throughout our countries history. I also find it interesting that the United States is such a neutral country towards tourism. A country that was based off of immigrants is no longer so welcoming to outsiders coming to our country. This could be due to the recent terrorist acts that have taken place within the United States in the past 15 years. Also just by looking at the map in a broader sense most of the countries that are unwelcoming are located in western Europe and Asia rather than anywhere else in the world.
Paul Beavers's comment, July 4, 2013 7:35 PM
Well the Chinese sure hide it well. I've visited there twice (once for a month) and I couldn't have been more welcomed. The people were the best part of both visits.
Bryan Chung's curator insight, May 8, 7:42 PM

cool

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Photographing Iconic Landmarks

Photographing Iconic Landmarks | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Oh, Machu Picchu, ancient city of the Incas, pride of Peru, must-see travel destination: You've never been so appropriately photobombed by a llama.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's comment, February 5, 2013 6:38 AM
You'll have to show me that picture this summer Kevin! My volleyball team is called the 'volley llamas' so this is our newest mascot.
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 8, 6:48 PM

If a picture says a thousand words, how many words can be said of a photo-bomb? This picture of Machu Piccuhu offers great comic relief from the llama following travelers. This llama practically posed for the couple that journeyed further out to get away from other tourists.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 28, 2:04 PM

Machu Picchu is a tourist attraction to say the least. People love going on adventures to ancient ruins and such. This would be a great place of historical cultivation for many people to see.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Great Mosque of Djenné

The Great Mosque of Djenné | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The Great Mosque of Djenné, Mali, is a magnet for tourists, but it is increasingly difficult for locals to live a normal life around it.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 7, 2013 2:03 PM

This New York Times short video is an intriguing glimpse into some of the cultural pressures behind having the designation of being an official world heritage site.  The grerat mosque combined with the traditional mud-brick feel to the whole city draws in tourists and is a source of communal pride, but many homeowners want to modernize and feel locked into traditional architecture by outside organizations that want them to preserve an 'authentic' cultural legacy.


Tags: Islam, tourism, place, religion, culture, historical, community, Mali, Africa.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Johnny Cash Has Been Everywhere (Man)!

Johnny Cash Has Been Everywhere (Man)! | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

This is more for the teachers than the students since this is most certainly not a current pop culture reference.  Still, what's better than an interactive map displaying the locations where Johnny Cash has been while listening to him sing "I've Been Everywhere?"  (Tech support: Use Google Chrome or Safari to play and ignore the finger).  


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Zoe Alexander's comment, December 4, 2012 12:06 AM
The map is missing Baranquilla, it's a city in Colombia
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Experiencing World Regional Geography

Experiencing World Regional Geography | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Two hundred countries and 20 times around the planet - a man's amazing journey in his Mercedes.

 

This 5 minute video is a glimpse into the life and travels of Gunther Holtorf, on a 23-year, 500,000 mile journey.  This man has experienced, lived and seen so many of the places, cultures and environments that we try to make come to life for our students as we study the wonderful world we live in.   


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

12 of the Most Beautiful Bays in the World

This is a great set of images that show coastal processes for a geomorphology or physical geography class.  Pictured above is Palm Bay, Australia, which also happens to show fluvial processes as well.  


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Photo of the Day-Iguazu Falls

Photo of the Day-Iguazu Falls | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
See a photo of Iguazu Falls in South America and download free wallpaper from National Geographic.

 

Beautiful image!  South America's equivalent to the Niagara Falls is a place that students should see.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Gordon Riley's comment, February 2, 2012 5:20 PM
This is quite the amazing photo. It expresses both the beauty and implacable power of nature. I am also amazed, yet never surprised, to discover the facility that was built on the edge of the falls, to offer the experience to all viewers. It is another model of human ingenuity.
Cam E's curator insight, February 11, 11:11 AM

I'm adding this to my list of places to go right away! I intend to visit most of the countries in the world in my lifetime, and this just happens to be on the border of two of them. It's a really cool sight even apart from its natural topography. It looks like the border is almost like a gap in the Earth itself. It reminds me a bit of how the Grand Canyon is a divide  close to the borders of Utah, Nevada, and Arizona.

 

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 11, 12:11 PM

This image of Iguazu Falls in South America is just another visual example of how beautiful the world is!

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Southmoore AP Human Geography
Scoop.it!

82 iconic world landmarks to visit

82 iconic world landmarks to visit | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Some buildings and features are so well known they have become icons of place.

 

This is a great collection of important world landmarks including the pictured Potala Palace in the Tibetan city of Lhasa.  Who wouldn't like to see some of these places?   

 

Tags: geo-inspiration, tourism, images.


Via Seth Dixon, Mr. David Burton
more...
Sophia Schroeder's comment, September 1, 2013 8:02 PM
All of these landmarks are beautiful. It's very interesting to see how much culture, especially religion, has shaped these "must see places." Also, I felt like I was traveling through time and got to examine the feats of new architectural eras, though some would debate that architectural works from the past are more outstanding strictly by the means in which they built these masterpieces. It needs to be said (to add to the wonderment of these places) that most of these monuments are built in places where the overall economic status is low; to see things like temples and churches of such great magnitude and beauty built with such craftsmanship, dedication, and money (even though it is scarce) shows how much they rely on their faith. I was also disappointed to see that the two monuments displayed for America, the Lincoln Memorial and the St. Louis Arch, were, in my opinion, not the best picks. Compared to the other landmarks ours feel so mundane, so void of history and culture (maybe, that's because I have grown up seeing them all my life and their meaning and awe has deteriorated to me.) I guess this can be attributed, in part, to the fact that our country is newer and has not yet grown enough to have the rich history including the trials and tribulations in which other countries have had which makes their culture more fascinating and intriguing to me.
Mary Rack's comment, September 2, 2013 12:49 AM
Sophia, Thanks for your very fine comment! I agree with you entirely, and especially about the Lincoln Memorial and St Louis Arch. Better choices might be the Grand Canyon, the Giant Sequoia trees in California, the National Cathedral in DC, or even Mt Rushmore? And some of the ancient cliff dwellings in the Southwest are amazing. Too bad they did not consult us.
Mary Rack's comment, September 2, 2013 12:51 AM
PS ... or the Hoover Dam?
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

World's Most Thrilling Airports

World's Most Thrilling Airports | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Caterin Victor's curator insight, October 27, 2013 4:02 PM

Amazing !!!

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:09 AM

Most people are scared enough to even go on a plan much less having to deal with some of these runways. This horrid runways include high altitude, short runways or even 90 degree turns to even advance onto the runway. Pretty scary if i might say so myself. Im surprised the St Maartens runways didn make the list with its threat of hitting a popular beach in the local proximity.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 7:02 PM

Some of these airports look to me as if planes won't make it. The one in Portugal goes over mountains and trees and is very short. Flying can be terrifying as it is but landing on some of these airport can be more nerve racking. This raises a question, was this the only land area these countries had to build a runway? 

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from ApocalypseSurvivalSkills
Scoop.it!

The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism

The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Researchers are heading to Dharavi, Mumbai, to study the impact of slum tours on the residents.

Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
more...
Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 8:36 PM

I don’t find nothing right about tourist visiting the slum, I feel that the tourist are violating there privacy. They are human being not some historical landmark. If the tourist are not helping this people why are they going? If you are going to visit this places do it because you want to help them, not because you think is interesting their way of living.

Cam E's curator insight, April 1, 11:57 AM

Moral questions are always fun. Personally I don't think going to see slums is all that exploitative in itself, but I would make a distinction between guided tours that cost money, and self-directed tours though. In a guided tour you are paying money to walk through a community and view what life is like for those people, but in a self-directed tour you are just another person walking down the streets and viewing whatever you stumble upon. There are plenty of tours within neighborhoods of different economic value the world over, but these tours are scrutinized because the people touring are as wealthy, or less wealthy, than the people living there. I don't think that a poor community changes this dynamic in an immoral way, as the perceptions of which group is superior come from the own minds of those who feel uncomfortable with it.

 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 9:41 AM

This article rises in interesting question.  Are tours of slums exploitive or beneficial to the slum dwellers?  On the one hand the tours could feel like exploitation and the tourist is viewing attractions at a “zoo”, on the other hand it brings people far removed from slum life in contact with it and can change people’s point of view on the slums.  It can be beneficial if the tour guides donate money to the slums or jobs are sought by slum dwellers to become tour guides.  The question is should slums be hidden away from view or opened up to tourists so that they can see the hardships first hand.  I think that this is an issue that is not clearly black or white; there are many shades of gray involved in this issue.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Top Ten Places to Visit in South America

The Top Ten Places to Visit in South America | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
South America is a land of natural exotic beauty that will leave you speechless, a land of mystery and great historic importance. If you make a trip to the southern hemisphere, be sure to include these precious gems.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Cam E's curator insight, February 11, 11:20 AM

A must-scoop for me since travel is a big plan of mine. #9 is high up on my list for the chance to climb the Andes. I''m a big hiker and already reached the summit of many mountains in the Northeast US, and even hiked portions of Mt. Etna. Both of these are nothing compared to the Andes, but these mountains were also relatively easy for me to climb, so a challenge would be welcome. The more extreme it is, the more interested I am. #6 calls to me also as I could potentially book a trip to Antarctica from there, and that's likely the easiest way I'd get there.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 28, 10:41 PM

This top ten list highlights some amazing sights in South America. There are several locations with fantastic geographic features including: towering mountain ranges, volcanoes with hot springs, fantastic beaches, ancient hidden cities, unbelievable waterfalls, incredible metropolises, and of course the Amazon Jungle with its millions of animal species.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 28, 2:03 PM

Attractions like these are what tourists go in search of. If you want to travel to beautiful places full of natural landscapes, South America is the place to go. The ruins that the water flows over gives it a special and magical touch. 

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Top Ten places to visit in Africa

The Top Ten places to visit in Africa | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Africa has a lot to offer the adventurous traveller. We've compiled a list of the must-see places any trip should include.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 5:18 PM

Although Africa does not have the greatest economic structure, it has beauty throughout. Here are the top 10 locations to visit in Africa that will take your breath away!

Cam E's curator insight, March 18, 12:54 PM

I always have to re-scoop these when I see them for different regions, as followers will already know, it's a big desire of mine to see most countries in the world, and natural/ancient environments are my favorite.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 8:23 PM

Just like the rest of these scoops, this is filled with awesome vacation and tourist spots. This bridge overlooks a fabulous waterfall that everyone should get to see something like it in their lives.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

A Poacher’s Redemption

A Poacher’s Redemption | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Jeffrey Gettleman, The Times’s Nairobi bureau chief, reports on how Kenya’s wildlife conservation corps is learning from a reformed poacher how to counter the growing threat to elephants.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 1, 2013 10:27 AM

In Somalia, former pirates are helping to patrol the coasts to prevent piracy.  This idea of reforming and recruiting past criminals is also seen in Kenya as former poachers are trying to protect elephants that are essential to the local ecology as well as the tourism-driven economy.  In addition to the attached video is this article which expands on these issues.  


Tags: biogeography, tourism, Africa, consumption, resources, ecology, Kenya.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 5:28 PM

A reformed poacher is now doing his part to keep the elephants safe. As the price of ivory skyrockets, elephants lives are threatened and endangered. However, as a reformed poacher, he is not new to the game and knows the odds and ends of what poachers do to attack. With his help, hopefully the growing threat will come to an end. 

Cam E's curator insight, March 18, 12:59 PM

You see this sort of thing all the time in crime dramas, the former criminal is let out to track down more of his or her kind. It's just a really smart move since they would know the methods best, and it's nice to see people redeem themselves and help the world rather than sit in punishment for years upon years.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why We Travel...

Why We Travel... | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

So go 'read' some more (Extra credit for identifying the location)!


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Morgan Halsey's comment, September 8, 2012 10:13 AM
I really like this quote and it got me thinking. One who does not experience what other places are like can only base life off of what they know. They don't know how blue the water of the Bahamas is or how it feels to stare up at the Eiffel Tower. They haven't been able to see the different cultures of the world and how they act. They only know what they know because of what they've seen in pictures or heard from other people. This does not give them the knowledge that they need about other places.
Kendall Dickson's comment, September 11, 2012 9:21 PM
St. Augustine hit this saying out of the ball park. Sometimes when I try taking picutres of the sky or of a scene, I will delete the picture because it just isnt the same as in realy life. I really think that traveling gives people a reality shock when seeing new phenomena.
Lydia Blevins's comment, September 12, 2012 10:14 PM
What i think this quote means is that you may think you know a lot about the world but until you go and travel to different places you will not fully understand the world. I also think it means that there is so many different things to experience on earth.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Border That Stole 500 Birthdays

The Border That Stole 500 Birthdays | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The story behind the the International Date Line.

 

Not too long ago (Jan. 2012), the arbitrary International Date Line (roughly opposite the Prime Meridian) was moved to better accommodate the regional networks and economic geography of the area straddling the line.  American Samoa, although politically aligned with the United States, was functionally more integrated on the Asian side of the Pacific Rim when it came to their trade partners and their tourism base.  Dynamic economic networks, political allegiances and cultural commonalities create a beautifully complex situation near this 'border.'    


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Al Picozzi's curator insight, December 5, 2013 4:42 PM

It made sense for American Samoa to ask for the move even though it is US territory.  It is more closely linked with the economies of the China, Japan, Australia, New Zeland and South Korea.  For them to all be on the same day just makes sense.  You can coordinate things better if everyone is on the same day, financial markets and be in line when the trading day starts and ends.  Seems to me to make sense that they are on the same day as their main economic partners.

Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 5:42 AM

This line clearly needs to be redrawn.  It just does not make sense that it could be monday in one area and tuesday 50 miles directly south of it.  While the new dateline does not necessarily have to be perfectly straight, it should at least not go directly horizontal as it does now.  Whoever lies on the line must deal with whatever place they have been placed in, and not complain.

Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:05 AM

My class examined this and we agree that it makes sense that American Samoa would want to be those they do business with like Asia, Australia and New Zealand.  ALthough American Samoa is a US territory, it definately does more business with the countries who are nearby and therefore they should be pushed to the other side of the dateline.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

8 of the Most Unique Paths in the World

8 of the Most Unique Paths in the World | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

This gorgeous gallery shows some of the most beautiful and distinct walkways around the world.  Take some time to just walk, and appreciate the world we live in.  Pictured above is the "stunning flower walkway [that] is the known as the Wisteria Tunnel, situated in the Kawachi Fuji Garden (City of Kitakyushu). It is an 80-meter (260 ft) long tunnel of white Fuji flowers, while a tunnel of yellow Kingusari needs a few more years to become an actual tunnel."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Places to See Before They Disappear

Places to See Before They Disappear | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
From Andalusia to Olympia, here are ten gorgeous places we might not have for much longer.

 

Some ecosystems are incredibly resilient in the face of climate change, while others are more vulnerable.  This slideshow looks at some of the most gorgeous, yet susceptible places on Earth. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lisa Fonseca's comment, October 17, 2011 11:13 PM
If these are some of the most incredible places on Earth why aren't we encouraging people or a way to help save these places. We have seen so many places get destroyed from natural disasters why aren't we trying to save these places. Also many of those places have a lot of tourism therefore it is essential we save them. Other places few but some I feel not many people would be familiar with. Why not inform people of what is going on. Finding way to help save these beautiful places.
Grammie's comment, October 21, 2011 12:20 AM
Ihave traveled to the most interesting and unusual places that we are aware of, what we need are leaders and people that are aware of these places that need saving, please help
Seth Dixon's comment, October 21, 2011 9:00 PM
I believe the "stewardship" metaphor for human environmental relations is an apt one, especially since misuse of the physical environment could most certainly place many decisions as making our societies as "bad stewards."