AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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It's Complicated: 5 Puzzling International Borders

It's Complicated: 5 Puzzling International Borders | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Most of us think of international borders as invisible, but clear-cut lines: stand on one side, and you’re in one country; stand on the other, you’re in another country.  But here’s a list of five international borders that, for one reason or another, are not quite that simple."


Via Seth Dixon, English Gallery
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 12, 2013 9:20 AM

This article is in dire needs of some maps, but it still provides 5 intriguing case studies of borders and chunks of territory that defy normal categorization.


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty.

Caterin Victor's curator insight, July 13, 2013 12:53 PM

It  is  Puzzling, but  every  human  being  chose to live in a normal,  happy  and  free  country, in a  Democratie,  if  possible.

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:20 PM

These borders and boundaries indicate something that I thought of while rewatching Independence Day (the Smith/Goldblum flick from '96)...  If we make a mess, and destroy this planet, aliens wouldn't want it.  The land that no one wants, is probably wanted by someone in reality... I am a fervent believer in aliens, and spend my free time diving into attempts to solve my quandary about the higher questions of the universe.  I think that the area that no one wants, everyone wants.  Unlike state boundaries in the US, planets are divided as separate entities from other planets, but grouped in solar systems, galaxies, asteroid belts, etc... I can't wait for the day some pompous fool gets on the bridge of a starship from Earth and sits in the captain's chair and says "Lieutenant, take us to Sector ----- (so and so)"... We will have moved up from the United States and Canada to the United Sectors of Galaxies!  And that little bit of land that 'no one wants,' everyone actually wants... same with planets.  Terraforming will allow those unsightly balls of fury that float around a star to become the most inhabitable of them all!  I wonder where these things will stop... or if it keeps going to larger sectors, endlessly? Well, we will likely encounter other species with territorial claims... play nice, America!  Or the Aliens will pop out of your stomach.  Though there are some politicians now that seem to have popped out of someone's stomach, I think the threat is more domestic while territory disputes occur nowadays, as it is humans arguing with humans, but it will increase when the Martians come to claim what is theirs.

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Argentina judge orders asset seizure of Falklands oil firms

Argentina judge orders asset seizure of Falklands oil firms | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A judge in Argentina orders the seizure of assets of firms drilling for oil around the Falklands, but it is unclear how it can be enforced.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 28, 2015 9:19 PM

Are they the Falklands or Las Malvinas?  It's not just a simple linguistic translation but also a statement of territoriality and geopolitical recognition in this festering situation.  For a great teaching resource on the historical ebbs and flows in this longstanding dispute between Argentina and the UK, see the second slideshow in this series of  AP Human Geography talks that was given at NCGE two years ago.   


Tags: Argentinaborders, political, territoriality, sovereignty.

ed alvarado's comment, July 4, 2015 12:31 AM
Thats superior
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22+ International Borders Around The World

22+ International Borders Around The World | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
History (and sometimes, unfortunately, current events) shows us just how easily national borders can change, but we still like to think that they are permanent fixtures.

Via Seth Dixon, Suvi Salo
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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 1, 2015 9:38 AM

Unit 4

Level343's curator insight, June 1, 2015 3:00 PM

Now that's cool!!

Dwane Burke's curator insight, June 3, 2015 6:16 PM

What do these say about the world?

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Complex International Borders

More complex international borders in this follow up to part 1. 
In this video I look at even more enclaves and exclaves."


Via Seth Dixon
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Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 23, 2015 11:40 PM

After viewing this video, I found one common characteristic that ties together the countries involved in all of these border disputes: hunger for power. Although culture and sacred lands do cause border disputes, I believe the underlying purpose of claiming land for cultural reasons is to demonstrate power. Claiming lands for cultural purposes demonstrates that one's culture is superior to the other's culture, so naturally the more powerful culture gets to claim territory. On another note, I think it's interesting to see just how many enclaves and exclaves exist in the world. I did not know how many existed until I saw the video. I think this shows how insignificant these border anomalies are because these exclaves are usually just governed by the other country by which they are surrounded. 

Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 7, 2015 9:13 PM

Borders seem to be a problem whether you live in one continent or another, everyone wants power and control but not everyone can gain it. This video focuses and goes into depth about enclave and exclave borders, showing the irregularity of the borders in different areas that causes conflicts and problems. An example of a problem that the citizens have to deal with is that some villages can not leave due to the road blocks due to the borders. I can not imagine not being able to leave a certain area for all that time, I would go insane and I imagine those people are as well. International borders power has to be split somehow and not everyone can always come to an easy decision because parts of the land are claimed but the people do not have any control of it. Irregular borders cause more trouble than they are worth in my opinion. The final interesting fact about this video was that you learn that Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan are the two locations that have the most irregular border, these places must have the most conflict and problems. These borders are in places such as Germany, South Asia, China, Belgian, Sweden and Central Asia.

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 17, 2015 5:17 PM

A fascinating look into the complexity of borders. It is always important to keep in mind when looking at maps that the borders are neither permanent or defined as it exists in reality. Borders on world maps are rough estimations of what the borders actually are for they can't depict precise details on such a large scale. Furthermore regional/local maps sometimes do not whether as to conform to the border misconception unfortunately. In Central Asia as defined int he video the border were primarily a result of the Soviet Unions attempts to divided ethnic minorities reducing their power (primarily Stalin). As a result the countries after the collapse proceeded to claim the ethnic groups which created enclaves within each-other. As long as these groups are on peaceful terms this kind of thing isn't an issue. Unfortunately it does make the peoples lives in the enclaves slightly more difficult due to having to cross the border twice to see the rest of your country. This kind of thing was even done to the Jews in the first century AD who like the Russians wanted to eliminate or at least reduce attempts at revolution by the local populace. Hopefully Central Asia has or will make the lives of these enclaves easier.

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Mistrust Threatens Delicate Balance at a Sacred Site in Jerusalem

Mistrust Threatens Delicate Balance at a Sacred Site in Jerusalem | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A site in the Old City of Jerusalem, known to Jews as the Temple Mount and to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary, has been a flash point since the advent of modern Zionism.

Via Seth Dixon
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Bob Beaven's curator insight, March 19, 2015 3:29 PM

Landmarks can have powerful meanings to different groups of people.  The Dome of the Rock is a sacred site to Muslims across the world.  The Mosque has stood on the location for centuries, and it is said to be built on the site where Mohamed ascended to Heaven.  To Jews, however, this site represents where Solomon's Temple was located.  It was destroyed two times, once by the Babylonians and another time, after being rebuilt by the Roman Empire.  Today, all that remains of this sacred site is the Western Wall.  The Wall is a sacred location to many Jews as it represents their heritage and their nation.  Yet, as the article notes, many Muslims are threatened by the new Jewish interests in the site and they fear that it will be taken by the Israeli government and the Temple will be rebuilt a third time on the Temple Mount.  This shows how much emotion can exist over a piece of land.  The Jewish need to rebuild their temple right on the very spot it once stood, it cannot be built elsewhere, meanwhile some Muslims deny that the Temple ever stood there and there are others who believe that the site should be renamed to "Al Aqsa Mosque or the Noble Sanctuary".  This is one of the great arguments that I believe will never be solved, should the Temple be rebuilt at the expense of the Dome of the Rock?  

 

Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 2015 4:03 PM

Sacred sites in Jerusalem are having difficulties due to the differences in culture from the surrounding countries. 

Raychel Johnson's curator insight, March 22, 2015 12:19 AM

Summary: This article is simply over the Israel-Palestine conflict, and how it has evolved since its beginning. This mostly talks about how Palestine believes that if Israel gains control of Jerusalem, they will get rid of Dome of the Rock, an important place of worship for the Islams. 

 

Insight: I think this article accurately represents concepts of political power and territoriality well due to the fact that these two territories are having a very long dispute about this one piece of land. I think there is definitely a solution that should be relatively simple, but with the amount of meaning this location has to both places, and with the continues terrorism occurring, I don't know if a simple solution would work. 

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Fragile States Index

Fragile States Index | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Weak and failing states pose a challenge to the international community. In today’s world, with its highly globalized economy, information systems and interlaced security, pressures on one fragile state can have serious repercussions not only for that state and its people, but also for its neighbors and other states halfway across the globe.  The Fragile States Index (FSI), produced by The Fund for Peace, is a critical tool in highlighting not only the normal pressures that all states experience, but also in identifying when those pressures are pushing a state towards the brink of failure."


Via Seth Dixon, malbert
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 27, 2014 3:31 PM

How can political stability and security be measured?  What constitutes effective governance?  The Fragile States Index (formerly known as the Failed States Index) is a statistical ranking designed to measure the effective political institutions across the globe.  There are  12 social, economic, and political/military categories that are a part of the overall rankings and various indicators are parts of the metrics that are a part of this index are:

SOCIAL

•Demographic Pressures 

•Refugees/IDPs

•Group Grievance

•Human Flight and Brain Drain

ECONOMIC

•Uneven Economic Development

•Poverty and Economic Decline

POLITICAL/MILITARY

•State Legitimacy

•Human Rights and Rule of Law

•Public Services

•Security Apparatus

•Factionalized Elites

•External Intervention


Tags: political, statisticsdevelopment, territoriality, sovereignty, conflict, political, devolution, war.

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, August 28, 2014 12:57 AM

How can political stability and security be measured? The Fragile States Index is a statistical ranking designed to measure the effective political institutions across the globe.

MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 2014 9:49 AM

APHG-Unit 4

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Lies Your World Map Told You: 5 Ways You're Being Misled

Lies Your World Map Told You: 5 Ways You're Being Misled | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Unfortunately, most world political maps aren't telling you the whole story. The idea that the earth's land is cleanly divvied up into nation-states - one country for each of the world's peoples - is more an imaginative ideal than a reality. Read on to learn about five ways your map is lying to you about borders, territories, and even the roster of the world's countries."


Via Seth Dixon, Malmci@Spatialzone
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Sally Egan's curator insight, June 23, 2014 6:32 PM

Amazing stories on the World's changing Geopolitical status. Current stories about disputed borders, unrecognised territories and  newly declared nations.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 29, 2014 9:41 PM

Nunca é "Toda a Verdade" ... 

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:49 PM

APHG-U1

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Trans-Dniester pleads to join Russia

Trans-Dniester pleads to join Russia | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Pro-Russian politicians and activists in Moldova's breakaway Trans-Dniester region have asked the Russian parliament to draft a law that would allow their territory to join Russia.


Via Seth Dixon
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Coach Frye's curator insight, March 20, 2014 10:46 AM

The Trans-Dniester region functions as a working state, but is not internationally recognized as such.  Members of this region are hoping Russia will annex them for political and economic stability.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 15, 2014 1:08 PM

A nation that is not internationally recognized, Trans-Dniester reflect how borders are subject to changed based on cultural differences. The region identifies with Russia more than it does with Moldova. After the USSR broke up, the borders were created without considering demographic and cultural makeup of each region of the new states. With the Ukraine and with Trans-Dniester we see how many eastern European regions still identify with Russia. As Russia seems more willing to expand, many borders are likely to change in the area.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, April 1, 2015 8:10 PM

This situation only further complicates Eastern European dynamics.  One thing that stood out to me after reading this aritcle is the reality that anti-Russian Ukraine is sandwiched between pro-Russian eastern Ukraine and pro-Russian eastern Moldova.  This situation can only get uglier.

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How Many Countries Are There?


Via Seth Dixon
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Heather Ramsey's curator insight, November 3, 2013 8:12 PM

This is one of those frequently asked questions in Geography class that sometimes results in increased confusion. The maker of this video has summed it up nicely.

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 8, 2013 2:44 AM

What makes a country a country is if they play by the rules, of other soverin nations on a global scale and follow the rules. Most countries recieve taxes from their citizens, have a military and a recognized as a soverin. Not every body of land is a country but are also properties controlled by other countries. There are countries in the South Pacific. In North, South America, Europe, and Asia, and bevcause of politcal geopgrahpy nations sizes are changing often and new countries are usually created from theis process

 

Mrs. B's curator insight, February 15, 2014 9:44 AM

193....except........

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Exclaves and Sovereignty

Exclaves and Sovereignty | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Prime Minister David Cameron is 'seriously concerned' about the escalation of tensions on the border between Spain and the British territory of Gibraltar."


Via Seth Dixon, Adrian Bahan (MNPS)
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megan b clement's curator insight, October 13, 2013 12:37 AM

"The video explains about Spain and Gibraltar and how they have feuded back and forth with one another and their borders for some time now. Gibraltar has made a articfical reef to mess with the Spainish fisherman and SPain has made travel to Gibraltar nearly impossible and dreadfully long for tourists. Spain understands how essential tourism is to their economy. Until they are able to come to an agreement thei matter is only going to intenisfy more and worsen."

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 2014 10:55 AM

I was unaware that the UK owned this part of Gibraltar.  It seems like a throwback to the UK’s naval policies of the past that they would still to control this point of entry into the Mediterranean.  It will be interesting to see how this will be resolved.  As it is a dispute between two countries that are both part of the EU. 

Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 11:59 AM
unit 4
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Exclaves and Sovereignty

Exclaves and Sovereignty | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Prime Minister David Cameron is 'seriously concerned' about the escalation of tensions on the border between Spain and the British territory of Gibraltar."


Via Seth Dixon, Scarpaci Human Geography
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megan b clement's curator insight, October 13, 2013 12:37 AM

"The video explains about Spain and Gibraltar and how they have feuded back and forth with one another and their borders for some time now. Gibraltar has made a articfical reef to mess with the Spainish fisherman and SPain has made travel to Gibraltar nearly impossible and dreadfully long for tourists. Spain understands how essential tourism is to their economy. Until they are able to come to an agreement thei matter is only going to intenisfy more and worsen."

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 2014 10:55 AM

I was unaware that the UK owned this part of Gibraltar.  It seems like a throwback to the UK’s naval policies of the past that they would still to control this point of entry into the Mediterranean.  It will be interesting to see how this will be resolved.  As it is a dispute between two countries that are both part of the EU. 

Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 11:59 AM
unit 4
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The Conflict Zone

The Conflict Zone | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"In a new series of four eight-minute videos, National Geographic Emerging Explorer Aziz Abu Sarah is a cultural educator working to build relationships between Israelis and Palestinians in Jerusalem and throughout Israel. In this series of four eight-minute videos, Abu Sarah meets with people from both sides of the conflict in order to better understand and communicate how this international dispute impacts their everyday lives."


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To Achieve Mideast Peace, Suspend Disbelief

To Achieve Mideast Peace, Suspend Disbelief | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In the search for Middle East peace, the most fundamental problem is the problem of disbelief.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 3, 2013 6:39 PM

Wouldn't you like to read the bullet points that accompany this graphic?  This article written by a peace negotiator is a good "bi-partisan" approach to understanding what would be needed to actually achieve peace in the Middle East.  The first step, is for both sides to believe that it can actually be achieved.  Filling in a blank diagram such as this would be a great way to get students seeing the same dispute from multiple perspectives.   


Tags: Israel, borders, Palestine, territoriality, political

Jessica Martel's curator insight, April 4, 2013 6:05 PM

This article explains the conflicts that are such a problem within the country of Israel, the conflict of religion and space. The Palestinians believe that they belong in the area, where the land was given to the Jewish people. These people are at war each day because they are fighting to hold on to a certain piece of land to claim for their own religion, yet they still incorrectly get blended together as one large group of people who are all the same due to the area they live.

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Disputed Isles

Disputed Isles | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Competing territorial claims have led to maritime disputes off the coast of Asia. See a map of the islands at issue.

 

This is an nice interactive map that allows the reader to explore current geopolitical conflicts that are about controlling islands.  This is an good source to use when introducing Exclusive Economic Zones, which is often the key strategic importance of small, lightly populated islands.   

 

Tags: EastAsia, SouthEastAsia, political, unit 4 political, territoriality, autonomy, conflict, economic. 


Via Seth Dixon, English Gallery
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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2014 2:40 PM

This interactive page gives relevant information about islands that are disputed over in southeast Asia.  I liked it because you could see the information in context with the map.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:47 PM

This is like a game of Monopoly when people try and get all the houses or businesses. Except this is real life and real isles. Whose is whose? How does Asia decide where and how the EEZ's should be divided.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:05 PM

considering that half of the nations involved are island nations, this is hardly surprising. every nation has issues with their neighbors. even the us and Canada dispute some territory. but these disputes can hardly end as well, when half of these nations have fought wars with each other for most of their histories.

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22+ International Borders Around The World

22+ International Borders Around The World | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
History (and sometimes, unfortunately, current events) shows us just how easily national borders can change, but we still like to think that they are permanent fixtures. These photos of different national borders around the world show you how both friendly and hostile nations like to fence off their turf.

 

Borders can make for some striking manifestations of power on the landscape.  On the other hand as seen in this picture of Slovakia, Austria and Hungary, friendship and cooperation can also be inscribed into the landscape.  There are some great teaching images in this gallery. 

 

Tags: border, political, territoriality, sovereignty,  images, land use, landscape.


Via Seth Dixon
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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 1, 2015 9:38 AM

Unit 4

Level343's curator insight, June 1, 2015 3:00 PM

Now that's cool!!

Dwane Burke's curator insight, June 3, 2015 6:16 PM

What do these say about the world?

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India-Pakistan border Ceremony

Fascinating footage of a traditional ceremony that takes place on the Pakistan India border. From the BBC

Via Seth Dixon
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Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 14, 2015 2:32 PM

This video was very fascinating. The soldiers preformed a traditional ceremony to display political cooperation without the use of force. They may have some differences in the past but they came together to show great sportsmanship.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 6:55 PM
This is truly a fascinating work of art. It shows tolerance to each other and it is done in a respectful manner. People are constantly showing up at their respectful borders to watch as each side in sync do their ceremonial marches. Some people are afraid that the two countries are just playing each other and they are waiting for an attack to happen. Although there was one instance of a suicide bomber killing sixty people. People had shown up at the Wagah border to witness the daily flag ceremony, but both sides cancelled for the day as a sign of respect.
Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:32 PM

whether or not this incites nationalism in a poor way, i think it is a good thing. no nationalism is a very detrimental thing to a country, i believe that this does benefit both countries in a way, maybe not as far as relations between the two countries but internally having love for your own country.

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Who Owns The North Pole?

"Though uninhabited and full of melting ice caps, the Arctic is surprisingly an appealing piece of real estate. Many countries have already claimed parts of the region. So who technically owns the North Pole? And why do these nations want it so bad?"


Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 2, 2015 5:52 PM

Great question!  I think we all know the answer...Santa Claus!! ;)

Sammy Shershevsky's curator insight, January 17, 2015 4:57 PM

The video discusses a big topic in discussion today - Who really owns the North Pole? Although the North Pole is uninhabited, many countries have claimed to take ownership of the vast majority of land (or, ice). Canada has already claimed that the North Pole is part of its nation. Russia has put up Russian flags on the North Pole (such as underwater) but does that really make North Pole a Russian territory? The media plays a role in this by offering different opinions on who should and who deserves the right to own the North Pole. You might read a Canadian article that lists all the outright reasons why the North Pole is or deserves to be a Canadian territory. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 6, 2015 7:26 PM

In my opinion, I don't understand how the United nations can be seen as an entity that, essentially, controls who would have rights to a place like the North Pole(technically, not owned by anyone).  I, naively, understand the basics of the U.N.  In short, it is an organization that was formed, post-WW I or II, as a governing board for world-issues.

 

 With that being said, how can they believe that their "law" is the all-powerful one?  If I'm a leader of a country who is not a member of the U.N., do I really care what they say?   I just find it odd that this narrator speaks about the issue while holding the U.N. as a supreme authority.  I know that this video is just a quick fun type of video but it leaves me with wanting to hear the perspective of a non-U.N. member.  But a very interesting topic, none the less.

 

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The Most Complex International Borders in the World

"In this video I look at some of the most complex international border. Of course, there are more complex borders in the world, but this video looks at some of my favourites."


Via Seth Dixon, Jodi Esaili
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ELAdvocacy's curator insight, October 3, 2014 9:40 AM

There are so many reasons our immigrant students come to the United States.  Some stories are so complex and painful it can be extremely difficult for Americans to understand.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, October 3, 2014 10:21 PM

Interesting!

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 6, 2014 5:39 AM

The Most Complex International Borders in the World

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Donut Holes in Law of the Sea

Donut Holes in Law of the Sea | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Sovereignty over land defines nation states since 1648. In contrast, sovereign right over the sea was formalised only in 1982. While land borders are well-known, sea borders escape the limelight."


Via Seth Dixon, Mary Rack
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 8, 2014 9:28 PM

These maritime borders mark the economic area is defined by its Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), a 200-nautical mile-wide (370 km) strip of sea along the country’s national coast line.  This regulation, which was installed by the ‘UN Convention on the Law of the Sea’ in 1982, grants a state special rights to exploit natural (such as oil) and marine (for instance fish) resources, including scientific research and energy production (wind-parks, for example).  This interactive map of the EEZs also shows the 'donut holes,' or the seas that are no state can claim that no state can claim.  Given the number of conflicts that are occurring--especially in East Asia--this map becomes a very valuable online resource for teaching political geography. 


Questions to ponder: how does this series of buffer zones around the Earth's land masses impact politics, the environment and local economies?  Where might the EEZs be more important to the success of a country/territory than other regions? 


Tagseconomic, environment, political, resources, water, sovereignty, coastal, environment depend, territoriality, states, conflict, unit 4 political.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 29, 2014 5:48 PM

Option topic Marine  Environments and management

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:52 PM

APHG-U4

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▶ Countries inside Countries: Bizarre Borders


Via Seth Dixon, Nancy Watson, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School, Dustin Fowler
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Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, May 18, 2014 2:52 PM

Talk about landlocked!  How would you form policy for a country that is completely surrounded by another country?

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 8:02 PM

APHG-U4

Tori Denney's curator insight, May 27, 2015 5:30 PM

nature, meaning, and function of boundaries - The most common boundaries are nation's borders. This video shows many landlocked or mostly surrounded states, that don't decisive as much freedom as states with many neighbors or open borders. These surrounded states value their borders and boundaries, because even if they are smaller or do not have as much freedom, they have their own state that they rule that is all theirs. The function of these borders as boundaries are to mark the edges of their state and to keep other states out.

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Walled World

Walled World | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
We chart the routes of, and reasons for, the barriers which are once again dividing populations

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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 2014 1:06 AM

We looked at this map in class its really interesting nd weird to see all the dividing walls in the world and to discover ones youve never seen before.

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 12, 2015 9:53 PM

The video attached to this article reminded me made me think "racism". It is not Americas first time targeting one cultural group and antagonizing them. We did it to the Indians, Jews, at one time we denied Chinese immigrants the right to enter the country or become a citizen. The projection of walls in my opinion only creates more room for crime. I would love to research what benefits its had. I think the world is lacking the understand that people are people .period. This segregation and division is so unnecessary and creates wars, tension, hostility, and divide.

 

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 2, 2015 9:41 AM

the social impact is we do not get to mingle with people of different culture, religion, ethnicity. Economically businesses do not grow at least on the small business side. There is no chance of growth. what about population once again if you stay with in a section divided by walls then the population stays within. a society would have to stay above the 2.06 fertility rate to keep their population stable.

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Bike Lanes


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Sofia Speranza's curator insight, October 10, 2013 2:10 PM

BIKERS. be aware of dangers on the street path

Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 10:27 AM

I find this to be very true. I have gone to big cities such as Boston and New York and it is always chaotic. I find that there is always terrible parking in the big cities. Also it seems very dangerous for the average civilian trying to get to his or her job on a daily basis. Me not being from around the area found it difficult to navigate.

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:45 PM

Bikers in New York City should know better not to ride their bikes around the streets because it is so busy and the traffic can be difficult. I know people use bikes to commute to work or school but this is New Yorks job to create more bike paths for people who want to use their bikes to commute. This will be safer for people to ride their bikes whenever they want. 

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Argentina renews Falklands claims

Argentina renews Falklands claims | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner renews her claims for sovereignty of the Falklands at a UN Security Council meeting.

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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:10 PM

I think that countries trying to unite and make claims is sort of like going to a bad college party in a station wagon with people that you might not like, don't like you, and are not like you... At least in the case of the USA.  As for Argentina, well I hope they're not as ravishly divided as the united of the constituents of America.  I don't really have anything good to say about this country... I have been physically and psychologically abused by police, damaged and violated by medical establishments, and I'm really sick of other people acting like they have the god-given right or my permission to treat me less than pleasantly.  How does this relate to Argentina requesting sovereignty? Well, I relate my personal experience to their situation in that they might be better off sovereign than being operated on by deranged fugitive doctors or beaten up by cops in bad relationships... so to speak.  For a lack of sovereignity would pose negative things that might befall their people.  I think that there is a greater chance for greater things to happen to them if they do it alone, rather than being told what to do, or being thought through and puppetted by other countries!

Joshua Mason's curator insight, February 19, 2015 12:59 PM

Often times, the thoughts of the Days of Empire are long gone. Most people see World War I as the boiling over of competition for colonies. As Europe gave most of their colonies up in the mid-20th century, some of them still stayed in their colonists' hands. The Falklands are that shining example of the UK's Empire days and it's understandable why they would want to hold on to them. Not only are they a decent naval base for operations in the Americas and along the Atlantic, they remind Great Britain that she was (and one could argue still is) a world power on the sea and land. No country wants to give away land voluntarily. Argentina sees these islands as her's and wants them back while the United Kingdom still holds claim. The UK also has the backing of the inhabitants when a referendum was held. Only three of the residents on the Falklands voted to split from its over seas ruler. What do you do when a country right off your shores demands your home back while a country thousands of miles away wants to keep you? It was a recipe for disaster in the 80's and still proves to be a point of tension in the 21st century.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 1, 2015 8:10 AM

The controversy of the Falklands continues. You would think that someone would have proposed viable solution to this issue by now. The Falklands war back in the 1980's remains one of my favorite skirmishes in history. The whole issue is throwback to the colonial era when the sun never set on the British Empire. In the years following the Second World War, the Empire collapsed. Today there is virtually nothing left of that once great empire. Great Britain should let one of its last vestiges of Empire go. There is no need for the British government to administer an Island in South America. The days of imperialism and colonialism have long since passed.

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It's Complicated: 5 Puzzling International Borders

It's Complicated: 5 Puzzling International Borders | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Most of us think of international borders as invisible, but clear-cut lines: stand on one side, and you’re in one country; stand on the other, you’re in another country.  But here’s a list of five international borders that, for one reason or another, are not quite that simple."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 12, 2013 9:20 AM

This article is in dire needs of some maps, but it still provides 5 intriguing case studies of borders and chunks of territory that defy normal categorization.


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty.

Caterin Victor's curator insight, July 13, 2013 12:53 PM

It  is  Puzzling, but  every  human  being  chose to live in a normal,  happy  and  free  country, in a  Democratie,  if  possible.

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:20 PM

These borders and boundaries indicate something that I thought of while rewatching Independence Day (the Smith/Goldblum flick from '96)...  If we make a mess, and destroy this planet, aliens wouldn't want it.  The land that no one wants, is probably wanted by someone in reality... I am a fervent believer in aliens, and spend my free time diving into attempts to solve my quandary about the higher questions of the universe.  I think that the area that no one wants, everyone wants.  Unlike state boundaries in the US, planets are divided as separate entities from other planets, but grouped in solar systems, galaxies, asteroid belts, etc... I can't wait for the day some pompous fool gets on the bridge of a starship from Earth and sits in the captain's chair and says "Lieutenant, take us to Sector ----- (so and so)"... We will have moved up from the United States and Canada to the United Sectors of Galaxies!  And that little bit of land that 'no one wants,' everyone actually wants... same with planets.  Terraforming will allow those unsightly balls of fury that float around a star to become the most inhabitable of them all!  I wonder where these things will stop... or if it keeps going to larger sectors, endlessly? Well, we will likely encounter other species with territorial claims... play nice, America!  Or the Aliens will pop out of your stomach.  Though there are some politicians now that seem to have popped out of someone's stomach, I think the threat is more domestic while territory disputes occur nowadays, as it is humans arguing with humans, but it will increase when the Martians come to claim what is theirs.

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South Sudan: The World’s Newest Country

South Sudan: The World’s Newest Country | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 2014 5:08 PM

South Sudan recently gained its independence from Sudan. South Sudan is now home to 10-12 million people and is the 193rd member of the United Nations. However, just because South Sudan became independent from Sudan does not mean it does not no longer carry some of the remaining issues.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 2014 1:26 PM

This infographic gives an idea of why South Sudan seceded from the rest of the country. Decades of civil war preceded the secession, and it is clear the cultural differences between the two areas were a contributing factor. South Sudan is a part of the fertile Sahel, with the majority of its people Christian, while Sudan is mostly desert, with the majority of its people Muslims. South Sudan, as a new nation, faces a number of difficulties. Its new government needed to remain stable to focus on nation building, but war has broken out between the government and a rebel faction. South Sudan, should it become stable again, should work to improve the education of its people, as the infographic explains, since the vote to secede needed symbols rather than words due to only 15% of its people being literate.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 4:05 PM

South Sudan has separated itself two years ago from the rest of Sudan. Its powers have become acknowledged by other countries and its messages to the outside world are ones of peace.