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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Maeklong Railway Market

"Multi-purpose land use."


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L.Long's curator insight, April 8, 5:57 PM

Megacities

Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 14, 11:42 AM

While watching this video I was very shocked and surprised, just because I know that if I was to visit and there was a train coming by at a veggie market I would not remain calm, cool and collected like the people shown in the video. Everyone has different customs in their lives and everyone makes use of their land differently, yes it is very unsanitary to have train tracks near food but that is definitely clever and a great source of space to do such a thing. The people in this video are aware of the train passing by and just pulls back their roofs back. The train tracks seem to be raised and the food underneath is not crushed, if it did get crushed people would be out of business and lose valuable money.

This system does not work in the United States because we are not using to trains passing by so casually, while in Thailand the people are accustomed to that life and go through the same procedure everyday. Traditions and customs are a part of daily life in all different places around the world, everyone lives differently and creates a specific life for themselves.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 15, 10:05 PM

In America you will hear safety first and health second. But for most veggie market sellers, health and safety do not matter. Every tiny bit of space, especially in Asian countries, are not wasted and organized. These people are used to dealing with this problem on a daily basis and they learn in the face of danger. Most of the time people live near train stations, which serves as a good location to sell products. One thing that I noticed is that no one is concerned when the trains approach the veggie market. Those veggie could get contaminated when the train goes through for example leaving metal bits from the brake system, hydraulic fluid.... etc. However, in the U.S. people argue about how the vegetables are treated with pesticides. This can lead to potential life hazards. Poor local communities need to adapt to survive in whatever space they can manage and take advantage of the available resources even when the environment makes it a challenge. 

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Recycling Steel

Steel is strong, versatile and 100% recyclable. Learn how old steel shipping containers are given a new lease on life as liveable spaces.

 

Reusing resources is a critical part of sustainability.  This video looks at the recycling of steel including the creating of container homes.


Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO, Michael Miller
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The largest city in Brazil is running dangerously low on water

The largest city in Brazil is running dangerously low on water | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Thanks to the worst drought in eight decades, millions of people in São Paulo are facing water outages.

 

Tags: Brazil, urban, water, urban ecology, climate change, environment depend, sustainability, agriculture, food production.


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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 23, 2014 4:59 PM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 25, 2014 12:49 PM

Brazil’s largest city, Sao Paulo, which provides one third of the countries GPD, is now running low or water due to one of the worst droughts in 8 years. There are more than 21 million people in this city and 13 million of them are facing water outages. If it doesn't rain soon, the city could face a collapse. The city has blamed the drought of lack of water in the vapor clouds that the amazon usually provides to the city. They also blame it on deforestation and global warming. President Dilma Rousseff has questioned the cities misusage of their water supply, claiming that the city mismanaged their water supply.  

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 23, 10:16 AM

This shows just how important water is the human race. It also shows how humans have no sense of urgency in conserving water until it's too late. The saying "you never know a good thing until it's gone" applies in this case. The Brazilian government did not take any sufficient measures to conserve water until it realized how depleted the reservoir is. This event demonstrates the environmental impact of  water depletion on humans, and how humans have such a huge impact on the geographical landscape on Earth. As seen in the picture above, many greens turned yellow as a result of the lowering water levels. The river beds are soon going to be overgrown by shrubbery as water no longer exists there. These are all results of a combination of natural (lack of rain) and human causes of resource depletion.

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Feeding Our Hungry Planet

"By 2050, the world's population will likely increase 35 percent. But is growing more food the only option—or even the best? National Geographic investigates the challenges and solutions to feeding everyone on our planet, based on an eight-month series in National Geographic magazine.  Visit http://natgeofood.com for ongoing coverage of food issues as we investigate the Future of Food today on World Food Day."

 

Tags: sustainability, agriculture, food production, unit 5 agriculture.


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Truthbehere2's curator insight, October 17, 2014 10:30 AM

I think I might as well buy some land and plant my own huge garden for this crap coming up and have a fence around my yard too

Nancy Watson's curator insight, October 19, 2014 8:53 AM

Population increase is just part of the story. How do we feed everyone? How will we provide for the needs of everyone?  Can the earth sustain the use of her resources and the impact of our growing needs and output. First we must eat. Can we learn to do that wisely? 

Bella Reagan's curator insight, November 28, 2014 5:48 PM

Unit 2-Population

 

This video was about the growing population in the world and as a result the growing food demand. This video points out that even though more food production seems like the solution, instead other solutions are more logical. Solutions include reducing wastes, preserving forests, being more productive on current farms and more. It states that farming is a huge business but it goes towards more than growing food for people to eat but also for other things like animals and materials. The worlds population is growing and there needs to be a change in food industries to keep thriving. 

 

This relates to unit 2 about population since it is thinking of ways to adapt to the worlds growing population. By 2050 it is predicted that population will increase by 33% and something has to change about food in order for people to stay fed. There is too much food being wasted that if that could be decreased it could make a huge difference. The video made a good point that it's not that we need more food it's that we need to manage and prioritize production.  

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'The Great Fish Swap': How America Is Downgrading Its Seafood Supply

'The Great Fish Swap': How America Is Downgrading Its Seafood Supply | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"One-third of the seafood Americans catch is sold abroad, but most of the seafood we eat here is imported and often of lower quality. Why? Author Paul Greenberg says it has to do with American tastes."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 9, 2014 8:00 PM

The United States exports the best-quality seafood that Americans catch, but import primarily low-grade aquacultural products.  This is just one of the counter-intuitive issues withe U.S. fish consumption and production.  This bizarre dynamic has cultural and economic explanations and this NPR podcast nicely explains these spatial patterns that are bound to frustrate those that advocate for locally sourced food productions. 


Tagsfood production, industry, food, agriculture, agribusinessconsumptioneconomic, sustainability.

HazelAnne Prescott's curator insight, July 31, 2014 10:56 AM

Seems like a messed up system.  We do not have "taste"

Abigail Mack's curator insight, July 31, 2014 11:27 AM

What would make Americans opt for the lower quality, imported fish?

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Developing World Cities and Population Density

Developing World Cities and Population Density | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Without a question, we are living in an urban era. More people now live in cities than anywhere else on the planet and I’ve repeatedly argued that cities are our most important economic engine. As a result of these shifts, we’re seeing megacities at a scale the world has never seen before.

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Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 27, 2014 12:05 PM
المدن الأعلى كثافة بالسكان على مستوى العالم
Sally Egan's curator insight, June 29, 2014 9:31 PM

Mega cities and the challenges they face for the future is focus in this article. Great statistics on populations and urban densities are also included.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:47 PM

APHG-U6

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Solar Roadways


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Gabriel Pizarro Dasso's curator insight, June 11, 2014 3:15 PM

creo que es al menos el mejor invento de diseño hasta hoy en día 

Nancy Watson's curator insight, June 13, 2014 9:26 AM

What an interesting idea. Power of the future?

Michelle Fulton's curator insight, June 17, 2014 8:20 PM

Some really interesting discussions could be held around this video-Geographically, Scientifically, Technologically, Environmentally, Creatively and Critically. 

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Maldives

Maldives | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:48 PM

Boy would I love to visit the Maldives. What an interesting and beautiful island it is.

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:36 PM

Volcanic activity created the formation of coral reefs, which have sustained the development of larger Islands, including the Maldives. Due to pollution, the westernized Maldives have lost much of their bio-diversity, so indigenous people who always rely on fish for basic  survival are having problems. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:21 PM

With sea levels rising the Maldives will be under water relatively soon. This will leave all those people either dead or as refugees. There needs to be an effort to find out what to do with all those people because it is too late to stop the seas from rising.

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SHADE: A Solar Home Adapts for Sustainable Desert Living

SHADE: A Solar Home Adapts for Sustainable Desert Living | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Team ASUNM, a collaborative effort between Arizona State University and University of New Mexico, has come together to address the inefficiencies of urban sprawl and to create a model for sustainable desert living, dubbed SHADE (Solar Home Adapting for Desert Equilibrium), which is an entry in the Solar Decathlon 2013 competition that takes place on October 3-13, 2013 in Irvine, California.

 

Using external vertical screens and a solar canopy for shade, the SHADE home experiences a stable, consistent temperature with the use of a radiant cooling system used alongside an air cooling unit. Team ASUNM is exploring the residential application of thermal storage to chill water at night to create ice that cools a glycol solution during the day.


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Pedro Barbosa's curator insight, July 18, 2013 4:15 AM

Exploring the deserts as a place to live may be a trend for the next decades or centuries. Here is one of the best approaches

 

Pedro Barbosa | www.pbarbosa.com | www.harvardtrends.com | www.theendoffacebook.com

gawlab's curator insight, July 18, 2013 3:28 PM

would love to know about existence of such solutions in Africa..

http://youtu.be/3AvjpnYE1gQ

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What will you do?

What will you do? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 7, 2013 9:02 PM

The world is in the palm of your hand; what will you do?  This is a question that each generation collectively needs to ask itself.  We can consider ourselves stewards of this planet with its vast natural resources and abundant potential.  If we make choices that are sustainable for the future we will keep many of these amazing possibilities open to future generations.  (For Hi-res image click here).  Just one more reason to read Geography Education.  


Tags: resources, sustainability.

Hoàng Phương's comment, July 8, 2013 5:22 AM
My hand make all thing.
Susana Negrin's comment, July 8, 2013 1:17 PM
Excelente estrategia para visitar el blog que es muy interesante!!
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Managing Global Resources


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 10, 2013 12:31 PM

How could this prompt (with accompanying activities and lesson plans) fit in with what you teach or study? 


Tags: consumption, food, development, resources, sustainability.

Sally Egan's curator insight, April 10, 2013 6:34 PM

Useful for teh Fodd Security section which will be in the National Curriculum. The video provides an animated presentation of reasons for inequity in food availability over the globe. The activities on Oxfam site are useable resources.

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From Pets To Plates: Why More People Are Eating Guinea Pigs

From Pets To Plates: Why More People Are Eating Guinea Pigs | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Guinea pigs are popular pets in the U.S., but in parts of South America, they're a delicacy. Some environmental and humanitarian groups are making a real push to encourage guinea pig farming as an eco-friendly alternative to beef.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 2, 2013 10:50 PM

First off, my apologies if you find the image distressing (I have two guinea pigs in my house and I will not be showing this picture to my children). However, the fact that many readers might find this image disturbing but wouldn't think twice about the sight of chicken grilling on the barbeque highlights the cultural taboos surrounding what we consider appropriate food sources.  The tradition has diffused to the United States as more South American immigrants have come to the United States.  While the meat is more environmentally sustainable (less resources are required to raise one pound of guinea pig meat than one pound of beef), many potential costumers are leery to eat something that they consider a pet.


Tags: food, diffusion, sustainability.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 9:21 PM

I can  see both sides of this, I would never eat a guinea pig because I grew up viewing them as pets. I think people are brought up a certain way and even when they move they take their customs with them.  I have a friend from china and lived there until he was 14 yrs old, he  had told me the city he was from they ate dog and cats. they view it as meat were we think of them as pets. 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 28, 2014 10:26 PM

This article is interesting because it is taking into consideration the ecological benefits of eating what we consider unorthodox meats. Raising guinea pigs for food would apparently leave a substantially smaller carbon footprint over a large, high waste producing animal like cows. Culturally, in South America guinea pigs are considered a delicacy, but I can't see culture changing in the United States to the point where we would give up hamburgers for grilled guinea pig.

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Adaptive Roots in the Concrete Jungle

Adaptive Roots in the Concrete Jungle | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"In this fantastic sighting by photographer Horst Kiechle, we see the roots of a tree in Bangkok, Thailand (Lat Yao, Chatuchak to be exact) growing into the grooves and cracks of an interlocking sidewalk. Even the colour of the roots gradually fade into the pavement."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 29, 2013 2:57 PM

This startling image is a powerful testament to the adaptive nature of many species to the urban environment.  Some species will adapt in beautiful ways such as this tree, while other will adapt in ways that go against our plan for that urban space (think rats, pigeons and cockroaches).  We adapt to our environment and the environment adapts to us as well; but that relationship is not always peaceful and symbiotic.  We can also destroy ecosystems that are fragile and not as resilient to change as this tree is.  See this same tree's root network one year later

 

Tags: urban ecology, environment adapt, sustainability, biogeography.

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Over population, over consumption - in pictures

Over population, over consumption - in pictures | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"How do you raise awareness about population explosion? One group thought that the simplest way would be to show people in pictures the impact of population, pollution and consumption."


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Jorge Del Castillo Díaz's curator insight, April 9, 1:38 PM

An example (in pictures) of how we change our plannet 

SRA's curator insight, April 13, 2:43 PM

This is an article found on theguardian that talks about overpopulation in some regions, and overconsumption in others. There are very powerful pictures of various places around the world that really give you an idea about what is happening around the world. The one that gave me the chills is the picture of the dead bird that ingested too much plastic, thus killing it. Another powerful picture taken is the one of the surfer in Indonesia, surfing a wave of trash. 


-Jack Christensen


SRA's curator insight, April 14, 8:16 PM

Jordan Linhart


It is absolutely astounding to me how we are so continually growing and expanding as a human race. What's more astounding to me is how quickly we are depleting and wasting all of the resources we have been given. Don't get me wrong, I was aware there were 7 pushing 8 billion of us on the planet, but growing up in the suburbs I wasn't as aware of it as I could have been. Ignorance is bliss, right? It breaks my heart to see the clearing of beautiful forests, the once turquoise water of Haiti filled with trash, and the death of animals that accidentally stumbled upon our waste. If we as humans don't start taking care of our planet, there won't be any where left for us to over populate, or even populate for that matter.

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Endangered Wildlife Trust

Endangered Wildlife Trust | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"If you don't pick it up they will."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 19, 12:03 PM

I found this ad from the Endangered Wildlife Trust to be very powerful.  It is a good introduction to systems and systems thinking.  

 

Tags: pollutionsustainability, environment, resources, water, coastal.

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Waging War Against Global Food Waste

Waging War Against Global Food Waste | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
National Geographic Emerging Explorer Tristram Stuart wants the world to stop throwing away so much good food.

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hailey thornton's curator insight, November 6, 2014 8:56 AM

what do we do when we have leftovers from our dinner. we throw it all away . if we just took the salvageable veggies that we can use to feed the animals that we end up eating . the landfills are being filled faster than we can get rid of what is in them .  we need to find alternative ways to get rid of our waste cause

we will be living in a land fill in the future if we dont

Rebecca McClure's curator insight, November 15, 2014 11:13 PM

Year 9: Food Security

Alex Lewis's curator insight, November 21, 2014 12:18 PM

I think this is a great idea, and the more we reduce our food waste, the better. We can use this food to feed the starving, which would solve two problems at once. Also, the idea of feeding the excess food to the pigs is a good idea. Not as good as conserving the food to give to the needy though. 

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Incredible photos show mountains of plastic bottles washed in Maldives

Incredible photos show mountains of plastic bottles washed in Maldives | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Award-winning filmmaker Alison Teal, 27, from Hawaii, visited Thilafushi – or Trash Island - an artificial island created as a municipal landfill situated to the west of Malé. 

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Uniterre Conférences's curator insight, October 1, 2014 8:51 PM

Photos prises aux maldives

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 2, 2014 6:17 PM

Option topic:  Marine Environments and management 

dilaycock's curator insight, October 3, 2014 8:07 PM

Oh wow. Such a disjuncture between what we imagine and the reality. I'm in a school where many of the students are beach-goers and surfers. These images should make them angry and get them thinking (and hopefully, acting).

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Sustaining Seven Billion People

Sustaining Seven Billion People | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"With seven billion people now living on Earth, the ever growing demand is putting unprecedented pressure on global resources—especially forests, water, and food. How can Earth’s resources be managed best to support so many people? One key is tracking the sum of what is available, and perhaps nothing is better suited to that task than satellites."

 


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Tom Cockburn's curator insight, July 13, 2014 5:52 AM

Vital debate for the future

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:44 PM

APHG-U2

Byron Northmore's curator insight, January 28, 8:24 PM

Love this imagery!

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The Rise of Innovative Districts

"Today, innovation is taking place where people can come together, not in isolated spaces. Innovation districts are this century's productive geography, they are both competitive places and 'cool spaces' and they will transform your city and metropolis."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 20, 2014 2:19 PM

As described by the Brookings Institution in their exploration regarding innovation districts, they are geographic areas where leading-edge companies, research institutions, start-ups, and business incubators are located in dense proximity. These districts are created to facilitate new connections and ideas, speed up the commercialization of those ideas, and support urban economies by growing jobs in ways that leverage their distinct economic position.


Tags: density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities, labor.

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Chris Hadfield: We Should Treat Earth as Kindly as We Treat Spacecraft - Wired Science

Chris Hadfield: We Should Treat Earth as Kindly as We Treat Spacecraft - Wired Science | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"People across the planet need to see and internalize an accurate global vision of place and individual account­ability—to recognize the problems that face us all and the technologies that exist to combat them. Our young ­people need to be able to look up, to look beyond the horizons of their forebears, and see the wisdom and opportunity that comes from a more universal sense of responsibility."


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dilaycock's curator insight, November 25, 2013 9:48 PM

A truly global perspective, from astronaut Chris Hadfield, on the need to look after our planet.

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What Happens When China Runs Out Of Land For Its Population? It Buys Part Of Ukraine

What Happens When China Runs Out Of Land For Its Population? It Buys Part Of Ukraine | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
No, it's not the punchline to a joke. China is industrializing so rapidly that it's bought a chunk of Ukraine to help keep its population fed. A look at the new trend in international trade.

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dilaycock's curator insight, September 25, 2013 9:57 PM

An indication of things to come? International agriculture on a massive scale.

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Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic)

Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic) | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future.

 In the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned “arcology” - a word that combines “architecture” and “ecology," with a goal of building structures to house large populations in self-contained environments with a self-sustaining economy and agriculture. “In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri)


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luiy's curator insight, July 8, 2013 7:42 AM
For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future as giant structures that contain entire metropolises. To some, these buildings present the best means for cities to exist in harmony with nature, while others forsee grotesque monstrosities destructive to the human spirit. In the mid-20th century, engineer and futurist R. Buckminster Fuller imagined city-enclosing plastic domes and enormous housing projects resembling nuclear cooling towers. These ideas are impractical but they explore the limits of conventional architectural thinking.  Science fiction writers and artists often imagine future architecture that oppresses the human spirit. Megastructures such as the pyramid-like Tyrell Buildings of “Blade Runner” dominate a decrepit skyline. The decaying old city is simply covered with layers of newer, larger buildings in a process of “retrofitting.” Beginning in the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned a more humane approach. The word “arcology” is a combination of “architecture” and “ecology.” The goal is to build megastructures that would house a population of a million or more people, but in a self-contained environment with its own economy and agriculture. “In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri) In 1996, a group of 75 Japanese corporations commissioned Soleri to design the one-kilometer-tall Hyper Bulding, a vertical city for 100,000 people. Existing in harmony with nature, the Hyper Building was designed to recycle waste, produce food in greenhouses, and use the sun’s light and heat for power and climate control.  The structure was designed for passive heating and cooling without the need for machinery. An economic recession put the brakes on the project and it was never built. Soleri’s arcology concept is being put to the test in the Arcosanti experimental community being built in Arizona. Construction began in 1970. When complete the town will house 5,000 people. Buildings are composed of locally produced concrete and are designed to capture sunlight and heat. To be built in the desert near Abu Dhabi, Masdar is a 2.3-square-mile (6 sq km) planned city of 40,000 residents. Buildings are designed to reduce reliance on artificial lighting and air conditioning, and the city will run entirely on solar power and renewable energy. Begun in 2006, the project is planned for completion around 2020-2025.
Fàtima Galan's curator insight, July 9, 2013 5:44 AM

Amazing and beautiful analysis!! Believe it or not, the science fiction also has something to teach us about the city of tomorrow.

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Urbanization and Megacities: Jakarta

"This case study examines the challenges of human well-being and urbanization, especially in the megacity of Jakarta."


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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 16, 2014 5:16 PM

In megacities, such as Jakarta, urbanization brings about many problems for local residents. The areas are crowded and residents get little to no income. An Australian organization works to help the people of Jakarta by giving them advice,food and helping where necessary. With this help, families are able to keep their spirits higher and hope that their children will live better lives than the ways that they were brought up.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 18, 2014 8:10 PM

Jakarta is the capitol of Indonesia and now has a population of over 28 million. Urbanization is bringing serious problems to Indonesia’s only mega city, such as poor access to clean water and housing, and overpopulation. Some people, including the young woman in this video are living with 16 or more people in one house. It seems the city is not providing enough affordable housing for its residents.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 2014 2:25 PM

It is nice to see an organization that is not just blindly giving resources to people in need but actually empowering them and training them to be able to get the things they need through work. The women in this story describe how they have learned to make and sell things in order to take care of their families and they describe how empowering that feels.

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6 Ways Climate Change Will Affect You

6 Ways Climate Change Will Affect You | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
From the food we eat to the energy, transportation, and water we all need, a warmer world will bring big changes for everyone.

 

B Sinica: This article touches every aspect of geography from culture to climate [considering] how the growing population plays the biggest role in determining the future of life on Earth.  People need to recognize the problems and potential future issues with global warming and the rapidly changing environment.  Though not many issues can be prevented or even solved, the least we can do is try to lessen the severity of devastation and prolong the current conditions as much as possible before the world becomes too extreme to manage.


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Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:22 PM
It is kind of a scary thought that global warming could greatly disrupt the way we live. Everyone is affected by it especially businesses like farms. The production of crops declines because of the excessive heat. Changing climate affect the length of each season which hurts the process of growing and harvesting crops. There would also be a change in the production, storage and transportation. It will cost more money to properly manage these businesses. This change will not only affect companies and how we handle our food but also our way of life and health. We would all have to adapt to such drastic changes in the environment which may be a struggle for some. Health wise, if it is too hot and people are not well adapted then it could lead to hospitalization and increased health risks. I don’t think there is much we can do to lessen the severity because it is a natural cycle of earth. I do think we may have sped up the process a little bit, for example car exhaustion and greenhouse gasses. But we are so dependent on such technology we can’t just make it disappear.
Dillon Cartwright's comment, May 3, 2013 4:04 PM
It's crazy that something like a little climate change can change the affect the entire world. Not just in one way either, it affects the world in many ways, like the 6 mentioned above. I don't think people realize the frailty of the environment they live in. Something as small as someones car exhaust becomes kind of a big deal when there are hundreds of millions of cars in the world.
In addition to that, I think it's great that life expectancy has gone up with cures to diseases and advances in modern medicine. It's a good thing that people are living longer lives, but it's a problem when these people aren't environmentally conscious. If there is going to be a consistent increase in population, there should also be an increase in environmental awareness so everyone can work together in slowing down this destructive process.
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:03 PM

Climate change is going to affect how we live in the future. It will cause lack of food, energy sources, health risks, climate changes, drought etc. It is because of our growing population and the amount of people the world has to take care of for all of us to survive. We are also using too many of its resources too quickly. What could we do now to try to slow down the process of it happening? 

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Top 10 Most Populated Cities In The World

Top 10 Most Populated Cities In The World | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Urbanization has led to what are known as mega-cities, cities with a population of over 10 million people. These mega-cities have become so large that they often lead to terrible pollution, traffic, and extreme poverty.

Via Seth Dixon, Michael Miller
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 14, 2013 10:56 AM

Over half the global population lives in cities, and the problems confronting these megacities will loom large for future sustainability issues--both at local and global scales. This list ranks the cities by city limits and governance jurisdiction (not by the expanded metropolitan area).  


Tags: urban, megacities, sustainability, unit 7 cities.

Erik Seglem's comment, March 15, 2013 11:22 AM
This is an interesting article, but it doesn't say how they came to their numbers. It seems like they may only be talking about within the 'city' limits, or some very old data. http://www.citypopulation.de/world/Agglomerations.html has some very different numbers as of the beginning of this year, their numbers however are the entire aggomeration and not just the 'city' limits.
Sally Egan's curator insight, March 18, 2013 7:17 PM

Over half the global population lives in cities, and the problems confronting these megacities will loom large for future sustainability issues--both at local and global scales. This list ranks the cities by city limits and governance jurisdiction (not by the expanded metropolitan area). 

 

 This is an interesting article, but it doesn't say how they came to their numbers. It seems like they may only be talking about within the 'city' limits, or some very old data. http://www.citypopulation.de/world/Agglomerations.html has some very different numbers as of the beginning of this year, their numbers however are the entire aggomeration and not just the 'city' limits.