AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Is Zealandia the eighth continent?

"A group of geologists say they've enough evidence to confirm the existence of a new continent. Writing in the journal of the Geological Society of America, the group named the eighth continent 'Zealandia.' Scientists argue for an 8th continent, Zealandia, in the Geological Society of America."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 8, 3:29 PM

What makes a continent a continent? There is no set definition of a continent. Some consider cultural groupings and would consider Europe as a separate continent from Asia as a consequence. Geologists consider continental shelves as the defining characteristics of a continent and thus consider Eurasia to be just one continent. We are so accustomed to seeing the coastlines, but if the ocean were drained, we'd see Zealandia and it's ancient confidential shelf--but don't expect all the continental maps in elementary schools to change anytime soon.

 

Questions to Ponder: Does human geography or physical geography determine what you consider a continent?  How come?       

 

Tags: physical, tectonics, geologyregions, Oceania.

Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, April 4, 4:08 PM
Seth Dixon's insight: What makes a continent a continent? There is no set definition of a continent. Some consider cultural groupings and would consider Europe as a separate continent from Asia as a consequence. Geologists consider continental shelves as the defining characteristics of a continent and thus consider Eurasia to be just one continent. We are so accustomed to seeing the coastlines, but if the ocean were drained, we'd see Zealandia and it's ancient confidential shelf--but don't expect all the continental maps in elementary schools to change anytime soon. Questions to Ponder: Does human geography or physical geography determine what you consider a continent? How come?
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 13, 10:59 AM
unit 1
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Nine Nations of North America, 30 Years Later

Nine Nations of North America, 30 Years Later | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Back in the ’70s, almost a hundred reporters around the country – Washington Post bureau chiefs, rovers, freelancers and me, their desk-bound editor – were trying to get our arms around how North America worked, really. Not how it should work. But how it did work. Forget those nice neat rectangles in the middle of the U.S. Let’s be real: The mountains of western Colorado are totally alien from the wheat fields of eastern Colorado. And Miami is part not of Florida, but its own watery Caribbean realm. And what a terrible idea is 'California.' It behaves as if it covers three warring civilizations. The result was my 1981 book, 'The Nine Nations of North America.' The reader reaction was astonishing. This map – drawn to anticipate the news – revealed something much deeper. It turned out to be a map of culture and values, which have nothing to do with our perversely drawn state and national boundaries."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 20, 2016 1:14 PM

Question to Ponder: How would you divide up North America?  What would be some differences from this map?  What reasons do you have for making these different regional groupings?  What are the main criteria for what constitutes a region?

 

Tags: regionsNorth America.

Tom Cockburn's curator insight, December 13, 2016 3:54 AM
Useful comparator to the megaregions map
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, December 17, 2016 11:56 PM

An interesting look at settlement patterns in the USA if using this to compare with spatial patterns in Australia. A deeper examination will reveal reasons for differences in settlement patterns between the two nations. 

 

Syllabus

Students investigate differences in urban settlement patterns between Australia and another country, for example: 

  • examination of urban settlements to determine patterns of concentration 
  • explanation of factors influencing urban concentration eg climate and topography, transportation networks, land use or perceptions of liveability
  • assessment of the consequences of urban concentrations on the characteristics, liveability and sustainability of places

Geoworld 9 NSW

Chapter 7: Urban settlement patterns Australia and the USA

7.1 Population concentrated near coasts

7.2 Urbanisation of indigenous populations

7.3 Is Australia a nation of tribes?

7.4 Nature in control

7.5 Coastal colonial cities and ports

7.6 USA: Settlement, geography and history

7.7 Large cities: Contrasting patterns

7.8 Sprawling suburbs: similar patterns

7.9 Consequences of urban concentration 

Geothink Activities 3 and  4. 

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Tornado Alley

Tornado Alley | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Interested in learning about tornado alley? Then you'll want to read our tornado alley facts and information. Tornado Alley 101

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 10, 2016 11:10 AM

This map nicely shows the particular air requirements needed for a tornado to form and why the part of the United States known as Tornado Alley accounts for the majority of the world's tornadoes.  This nicely shows how physical geographic factors form a major part of how a region might be defined and conceptualized. 

 

Tags: tornado, physical, weather and climate, visualization, regions.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, November 16, 2016 5:35 PM

Atmospheric hazard

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, November 17, 2016 5:56 AM
USA Tornado
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How to Say 'Banana' in Spanish

How to Say 'Banana' in Spanish | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 22, 2016 3:02 PM

I've lived in both the plátano and banano sub-regions of the Spanish-speaking realm and this discrepancy was one I always found curious (likewise, peanut butter is called crema de cacahuate in Mexico, but mantequilla de maní in Costa Rica). I've had many humorous encounters with friends from throughout the Spanish-speaking world when words that mean one thing in a particular country have VERY different connotations in another.

 

Questions to Ponder: Why do languages have different vocabularies in distinct places?  Why makes a language especially prone to a varied set of regionalized terms?

 

Tags: language, colonialismdiffusion, culture, mapping, regions.

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These Maps Show How Vast New Infrastructure Is Bringing the World Together

These Maps Show How Vast New Infrastructure Is Bringing the World Together | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"If you want to understand the world of tomorrow, why not just look at a good map? For my (Parag Khanna) new book, Connectography, I researched every single significant cross-border infrastructure project linking countries together on every continent. I worked with the world’s leading cartography labs to literally map out what the future actually — physically — will look like.

It turns out that what most defines the emerging world is not fragmentation of countries but integration within regions. The same world that appears to be falling apart is actually coming together in much more concrete ways than today’s political maps suggest. Major world regions are forging dense infrastructural connectivity and reorienting their relations around supply chains rather than borders."

 

Tags: regions, map.


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Why Ukraine needs Russia more than ever

Why Ukraine needs Russia more than ever | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
As the country risks becoming a failed state, Kiev must recognise that economic survival depends on Moscow not the west

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 23, 2016 4:24 PM

This is a politically inflammatory title for an op-ed article, given the recent Russia's seizure of the Crimean Peninsula from Ukraine.  Regions and economic regional linkages form and continually reform.  Our most likely business partners aren't necessarily our best friends.      

 

Tags: op-ed, economic, regions, UkraineRussia.  

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Persian (or Arabian) Gulf Is Caught in the Middle of Regional Rivalries

Persian (or Arabian) Gulf Is Caught in the Middle of Regional Rivalries | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Tensions between Iran and Saudi Arabia have been escalating on many fronts — over wars in Syria and Yemen, the Saudis’ execution of a dissident Shiite cleric and the Iran nuclear deal. The dispute runs so deep that the regional rivals — one a Shiite theocracy, the other a Sunni monarchy — even clash over the name of the body of water that separates them.

Iran insists that it be called the Persian Gulf, and has banned publications that fail to use that name. Yet this riles Arab nations, which have succeeded in pushing various parties to use their preferred term — Arabian Gulf."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 3, 2016 2:36 PM

Is it the Persian Gulf or the Arabian Gulf?  This mini-controversy is part of a broader fight to exert greater regional power and influence (see also this article on GeoCurrents on the same topic). 

 

Tags: placeregions, language, toponyms.

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Place and Self

"We are Dangerdust. We love chalk. We started this project at the beginning of our senior year in college. It all began because we wanted to share a quote that had inspired us, in the hope that it would inspire others. We sneaked into school that weekend to illustrate the quote on an abandoned chalkboard. After that one time we were hooked, and Dangerdust was created."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 3, 2015 11:05 PM

We are sometimes so obsessively focused on the self in our society, that we discount the communal and the spatial impacts in describing who we are.  So much of our 'selves' that we prize as so highly individualized and unique are a beautiful product of all the places and people who have influenced and shaped our lives. 


Tagsregions, images, art

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Is it time to scrap "Eastern Europe"?

"Europe’s divisions are indeed grave. But counting the ex-communist countries as a single category is outdated and damaging "


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Vermont Social Studies's curator insight, October 6, 2015 8:47 AM

Danube Europe? Roma Europe? Scared of Russia Europe? Solvent Europe? Could be a great learning exercise to have your students decide and justify the best new term.

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, November 4, 2015 7:15 PM

I don't know what else you'd want to call the region. Western Asia? Western Russia? I understand that the culture isn't particularly what one would think of when they think "Europe". Regions are like nicknames, you don't get to pick your own (unless you're Howard Stern).

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 7, 2015 11:53 AM

It's true the term Eastern Europe is very outdated because borders are constantly changing. Also different ethnic groups and geographic differences that make up the region divide the west and east. However, some countries such as Greece wants to be more Europe and the countries surrounding it are not really "western". So by labeling countries by fixed region is not very accurate in terms of where they are located on the map.

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How Not to Be Ignorant About the World

How much do you know about the world? Hans Rosling, with his famous charts of global population, health and income data (and an extra-extra-long pointer), demonstrates that you have a high statistical chance of being quite wrong about what you think you know. Play along with his audience quiz — then, from Hans’ son Ola, learn 4 ways to quickly get less ignorant.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 17, 2015 5:01 PM

Our preconceived notions of places, as well as some of the dominant narratives about regions, can cloud our understanding about the world today.  This video is a good introduction to the Ignorance Project which shows how personal bias, outdated world views and news bias collectively make combating global ignorance difficult.   However, the end of the video shows some good rules of thumb to have a more fact-based world view.  


Tagsstatistics, placeregions, media, models, gapminderdevelopment, perspective.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, September 18, 2015 11:32 PM

adicionar sua visão ...

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See where women outnumber men around the world (and why)

See where women outnumber men around the world (and why) | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"A new study maps the population gaps between men and women around the world."

 


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Laura Lee Smith's comment, September 7, 2015 7:19 PM
This is actually something I discussed a while back with a friend of mine who is from Russia, how there is such a huge lack of marriageable men that women there consider being a mail order bride a good alternative to spinsterhood.
Laura Lee Smith's comment, September 7, 2015 7:19 PM
This is actually something I discussed a while back with a friend of mine who is from Russia, how there is such a huge lack of marriageable men that women there consider being a mail order bride a good alternative to spinsterhood.
Cohen Adkins's curator insight, September 8, 2015 4:59 PM

Its amazing how well balanced some countries are with the ratio of men to women how ever some of the 3rd world countries are off balance but not to an extreme.

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American Curses, Mapped

American Curses, Mapped | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Americans love to curse. The question is, which bad words are favored where? Who says “*#@&” the most? Who says “$%*#” the least? Is there a “*#$” belt? (As it turns out, yes: From New York City down to the Gulf Coast.)"

 

Tags: language, culture, diffusion, popular culture, mapping, regions.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 16, 2015 11:05 PM

If you don't want to hear potty talk, this is not the set of maps on linguistic geography for you...I'm just sayin', you've been forewarned.  An isogloss is a line that separates regions that use different words for the same object/concept.  Thing of isoglosses as linguistic contour lines...are there any swearing isoglosses?  Swearing regions?     

Jamie Strickland's comment, July 21, 2015 3:03 PM
I f-ing love this!
Erin McLeod's curator insight, August 6, 2015 11:00 PM

If you don't want to hear potty talk, this is not the set of maps on linguistic geography for you...I'm just sayin', you've been forewarned.  An isogloss is a line that separates regions that use different words for the same object/concept.  Thing of isoglosses as linguistic contour lines...are there any swearing isoglosses?  Swearing regions?     

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Saudi Arabia's Leadership


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 4, 2015 2:39 PM

King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia passed away on Jan 23rd and has been replaced by King Salman.  What does that mean for Saudi Arabia?  What will it mean for the region?  The Plaid Avenger has the answers (here are the links for part 2 and part 3).

 

TagsSaudi Arabiaculturegeopoliticspolitical, Middle East.

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Urban world: Meeting the demographic challenge in cities

Urban world: Meeting the demographic challenge in cities | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The days of easy growth in the world’s cities are over, and how they respond to demographic shifts will influence their prosperity.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 14, 3:54 PM

Some cities throughout Africa and Asia have experienced spectacular growth.  Europe, on the other isn't see the same level of growth and is even experiencing urban decline in a few regions. 

 

Questions to Ponder: What patterns do you see in these maps?  What cultural, demographic and economic factors explain some of the regional patterns in these maps?        

 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 13, 11:00 AM
unit 7
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Data from 130 million commuters reveal US ‘megaregions’ - News - Urban Studies and Planning - The University of Sheffield

Data from 130 million commuters reveal US ‘megaregions’ - News - Urban Studies and Planning - The University of Sheffield | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
From a former student. Thanks Gage! 

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, November 30, 2016 8:35 PM
Share your insight
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Who Likes Whom in The Middle East? Key players & Notable relationships

Who Likes Whom in The Middle East? Key players & Notable relationships | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
An interactive network visualisation of key players & notable relationships in the Middle East region. Continually updated. Awesome looking.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 25, 2016 10:43 PM

News flash:the Middle East is complicated.  In a region where the enemy of an enemy can be your friend, keeping track of local, regional, and global interests can be a staggering proposition.  This flow chart is both incredibly complex, but also aids the user in making sense of the relationships that help to define the region.  

 

Tags: MiddleEast, conflict, political, geopoliticsregions.

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Climate Comparison Maps

Climate Comparison Maps | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Triton1982 makes maps by comparing each of the city's highest and lowest average temperatures against the Koppen classification system."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 12, 2016 12:50 PM

Many maps are shared on Reddit, and this series of maps help make some far off places easier to relate to.  I think these cross-regional comparisons can also help students also see that countries can have a great degree of internal variety.  

 

Tags: Australia, Oceania, mapping, visualization 

Profesor Vázquez Rubén Andrés's curator insight, September 13, 2016 3:55 PM
Comparacion climatica
Lee Hancock's curator insight, November 1, 2016 5:46 PM

Australian climate. Note the comparative climates of our future case studies, Kosciuszko Alpine ecosystem and the Great Barrier Reef.

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These Maps Show How Vast New Infrastructure Is Bringing the World Together

These Maps Show How Vast New Infrastructure Is Bringing the World Together | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"If you want to understand the world of tomorrow, why not just look at a good map? For my (Parag Khanna) new book, Connectography, I researched every single significant cross-border infrastructure project linking countries together on every continent. I worked with the world’s leading cartography labs to literally map out what the future actually — physically — will look like.

It turns out that what most defines the emerging world is not fragmentation of countries but integration within regions. The same world that appears to be falling apart is actually coming together in much more concrete ways than today’s political maps suggest. Major world regions are forging dense infrastructural connectivity and reorienting their relations around supply chains rather than borders."

 

Tags: regions, map.


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A New Map for America

A New Map for America | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The 50-state model is holding the country back. It needs a new system, built around urban corridors.

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Jean-Simon Venne's curator insight, April 28, 2016 8:13 AM
We should build a similar map for technology innovaton
Character Minutes's curator insight, July 1, 2016 7:13 PM
Great way to encourage critical thinking in students: what would this impact? Adv & Disadvantages? Compare 50 states vs this model? How would new plan be implemented? 

Alex Smiga's curator insight, August 30, 2016 2:26 PM
...and back to city states?
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The Geography of Language

"Over the course of human history, thousands of languages have developed from what was once a much smaller number. How did we end up with so many? And how do we keep track of them all? Alex Gendler explains how linguists group languages into language families, demonstrating how these linguistic trees give us crucial insights into the past."


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Woodstock School's curator insight, June 4, 2014 6:05 AM

A good teaching tool for explaining the diversity of languages.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 12, 2014 9:38 PM

Geografia Cultural

Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 11, 2015 11:46 PM

Summary- This video explains how so many languages came to be and why. By the early existence of human there was a such smaller variety of languages. Tribes that spoke one language would often split in search of new recourses. Searching tribe would develop in many new different ways than the original tribe. new foods, land, and other elements created a radically different language than the original. 

 

Insight- In unit 3 we study language as a big element of out chapter. One key question in chapter 6 was why are languages distributed the way they are. It is obvious from the video that languages are distributed they way they are is because of the breaking up from people which forced people to develop differently thus creating a different language. As this process continues, there become more and more branches of a language family.  

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Which NFL Team Are You Stuck Watching Every Sunday?

Which NFL Team Are You Stuck Watching Every Sunday? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Like millions of other Americans, I watch the NFL on a regular basis. However, just like millions of other viewers, most Sundays I am not sure which games will be on my television. For years, the strange geographic structures that underpinned league broadcasts were almost entirely obscured from the average consumer. People would turn on their TVs expecting to see one game only to be disappointed by another.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 16, 2015 1:25 PM

The top map is essentially a major market analysis of sports teams and shows to some extent the media hinterlands of America's major cities.  The second map I find even more interesting; all teams are regional, but a select few have larger national followings (if you are a fan of the Packers, Steelers, 49ers or Cowboys and are not from those areas, maybe I can guess your age).  There are many other maps in this interesting sports geography article.  What patterns do you see?  Explanations? 


Tag: sportspatialmapping, regions.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 20, 2015 11:31 AM

unit 1 and 6

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Can you identify these world cities from their street plans alone?

Can you identify these world cities from their street plans alone? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
We’ve stripped out the street names and lost the labels – but can you still recognise the cities from their aerial views?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 30, 2015 1:22 PM

This is a fun map quiz that is part memory, but also relies on pattern recognition to see if you can understand the urban morphology that shaped these places.  I got 11 out of 13...can anybody top that?  I'm sure someone can; give it a shot.  


Tagsplanning, architecture, urban, regions, trivia, games.

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Why Are Migrants Surging Into Europe Now?

Why Are Migrants Surging Into Europe Now? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The steady stream of migrants in past years has turned into a torrent this year. Here's a primer on the main forces at work.

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Chelsea Martines's curator insight, September 3, 2015 8:48 PM

There have been many many refugees that are Migrating to Europe recently. 300,000 Africans and middle easterners have gone to Morocco and then to Greece and other eastern Europe  and Mediterranean countries. These people are escaping wars and political turmoil and ripen is now having to deal with taking in all the refugees and help the families and young and old people especially that are in critical condition.

Tracy Harding's comment, September 22, 2015 10:13 AM
You provided a summary. Remember that you need a summary, global impact and personal thoughts.
Massimo Di Duca's comment, September 27, 2015 9:42 AM
Necessary obligation the UN
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The Food Capitals of Instagram

The Food Capitals of Instagram | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Explore the popularity of some of the world’s favourite foods on Instagram. Discover Instagram’s capital of curry, which cities are big on burgers, and where pulled pork is most prolific.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 12, 2015 8:41 PM

I was talking to a good friend about the geographic distribution of poutine after watching the silliest YouTube video. (Montreal is famous for it's poutine, but is in equally widespread throughout Quebec?  Canada?  Is there a core/domain/sphere areas to be mapped? These are the questions that plague geographers.).  True, this map has it's limitations; Instagram hashtag data isn't normalized so the biggest cities tend to pop out more easily, access/use of Instagram isn't uniform, etc.  Still, what a great map to show some geographic applications of social media data.  This sort of map also nicely shows the spatial concepts of region, diffusion, concentration and distribution.  


Tags: visualizationsocial media, mapping, culturediffusion, popular culture, regions, food.

Immigration Overseas Complaints's comment, August 21, 2015 8:50 AM
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Quiz: Can you name a food just by looking at where it comes from?

Quiz: Can you name a food just by looking at where it comes from? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
I map the food, you tell me what it is.

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Gabriel Olson's curator insight, February 13, 2015 2:59 PM

We ought to know something about where our food comes from...

Eden Eaves's curator insight, March 24, 2015 1:04 AM

Unit 5

Some  of these maps are easy to guess, such as cotton being grown in the south, but what about others like pigs being raised in the mid-west and North Carolina??? We are so used to having only to make a quick stop at the nearest grocery store to grab our weekly essentials that we don't always think about where it naturally comes from. Also preservatives have come so far as to keep things fresh for long periods of time that where it originates is not a problem because it can be shipped in a refrigerated truck with still time left for it to sit in your fridge for a few days. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:34 PM

This 12 question quiz is a great way to introduce students to spatial patterns of agricultural products in the United States.  Sometimes just knowing regional stereotypes can be helpful, but being able to make an educated guess about where an agricultural product is comes from requires a basic understanding of economic and climate patterns.  This quiz is a good way to test that knowledge and introduce them to these spatial patterns.    

 

Tags: triviaspatial, regions, foodeconomic, food production, agriculture.