AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
6.9K views | +0 today
Follow
AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Best News You Don’t Know

The Best News You Don’t Know | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
I’ve covered massacres in South Sudan, concentration camps in Myanmar and widespread stunting in India, but it’s also important to acknowledge the backdrop of global progress. Otherwise, the public may perceive poverty as hopeless and see no point in carrying on the fight — at just the point when we’re making the most rapid gains ever recorded.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 25, 3:37 PM

The world is winning the war on extreme poverty, but most Americans think that poverty is getting worse. Doom and gloom can dominate media coverage because a horrific tragedy gets better rating than slow incremental improvements.  The general public is often ignorant of the measurable improvements going on in the world today.  No, the world isn’t perfect, but it is getting better. 

 

Tags: mediapoverty, development, economic, perspective.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Esaili's Geography
Scoop.it!

The Subtle Design Features That Make Cities Feel More Hostile

The Subtle Design Features That Make Cities Feel More Hostile | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Think your city doesn’t like you? You’re right.

Via Seth Dixon, Jodi Esaili
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 6, 11:51 AM

Geography explores more than just what countries control a certain territory and what landforms are there.  Geography explores the spatial manifestations of power and how place is crafted to fit a particular vision.  Homeless people are essentially always 'out of place.'  These articles from the Society Pages, Atlas Obscura, the Atlantic and this one from the Guardian share similar things: that urban planners actively design places that will discourage loitering, skate boarding, and homelessness, which are all undesirable to local businesses.  This gallery shows various defensive architectural tactics to make certain people feel 'out of place.'  Just to show that not all urban designs are anti-homeless, this bench is one that is designed to help the homeless (and here is an ingenious plan to curb public urination).  

    

Tags: urbanplanning, architecture, landscape, place, poverty.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Where Ships Go to Die, Workers Risk Everything

In Bangladesh, men desperate for work perform one of the world's most dangerous jobs. They demolish huge ships in grueling conditions, braving disease

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 28, 3:34 PM

What happens to massive cargo vessels after they are outdated?  There are tons of scrap metal on these ships, but they aren't designed to be taken apart.  The ship-breakers of South Asia (Bangladesh, India and Pakistan are 3 of the 4 global leaders in recycling ships) risk much to mine this resource.  This is an economic function that is a part of a globalized economy, but one than was never intended.  There are major health risks to the workers and pollutants to the local community that are endemic in this industry that manages to survive on the scraps of the global economy.

 

Tags: BangladeshNational Geographic, South Asia, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from HMHS History
Scoop.it!

The Geography of Hunger and Food Insecurity

Why are some communities more vulnerable to hunger and famine? There are many reasons, which together add up to food insecurity, the world's no.1 health risk...

 

Excellent summary of the geographic factors that lead to food insecurity and hunger and the main ways NGO's are trying to combat the issues.   This is an incredibly complex problem that, at it's heart, is a geographic issue that can challenge student to synthesize information and make the connections between topics.  


Via Seth Dixon, Michael Miller
more...
Lisa Fonseca's comment, December 5, 2011 1:02 AM
This is a incredible clip that does challenge students to synthesize information and make the connections between topics, but it can also help students to realize making a difference at a early age is important. I learned an abundance of facts just from watching, it was informative and intriguing. As I was watching the video I was thinking of ways it can be incorporated into the classroom. This video could get students to learn about the world's number one health risk. Incorporating it into the classroom by holding a food drive, or having a school wide fundraiser to donate to the British Red Cross is also another way to help. Getting our future minds informed and helping the community will make an impact in the future.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Mrs. Watson's Class
Scoop.it!

The New Face of Hunger

The New Face of Hunger | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Why are people malnourished in the richest country on Earth?

Via Nancy Watson
more...
Nancy Watson's curator insight, January 24, 4:45 PM

The US may produce 20% of the world's food, but millions of Americans do not know where their next meal is coming from. Poverty can be found in rich farming areas, low income urban or suburban neighborhoods.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Giving the Poor Easy Access to Healthy Food Doesn’t Mean They’ll Buy It

Giving the Poor Easy Access to Healthy Food Doesn’t Mean They’ll Buy It | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Those living in areas without fresh produce tend not to eat well. But just putting in a supermarket is not a panacea, it turns out.

 

Tags: food distribution, food, economic, poverty, place, socioeconomic, neighborhood.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 10, 2015 9:27 AM

Stigmergy at work.

Meridith Hembree Berry's curator insight, May 10, 2015 3:55 PM

It is difficult to change the junk food and convenience food culture in one generation. 

Robert Slone's curator insight, May 19, 2015 9:04 AM

This was really surprising , it is amazing how education effects every area of our lives .

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

University Re-Imagines Town And Gown Relationship In Philadelphia

University Re-Imagines Town And Gown Relationship In Philadelphia | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Drexel University is taking a hands-on approach to redeveloping one of Philadelphia's poorest neighborhoods with a new center designed to serve not just students but mainly local residents.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 30, 2015 12:49 PM

This NPR podcast shows a good example of an urban revitalization project that is actively trying to avoid following the gentrification path.  Growing colleges can unintentionally displace longtime residents, but this project is about preserving the cultural fabric of the neighborhood and building good will in the community. 


Tags: neighborhoodpodcast, gentrificationurban, place, culture, economicracepoverty.

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, April 8, 2015 12:29 PM

APHG- HW Option 3

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Too rich for its own good

Too rich for its own good | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The Democratic Republic of Congo is potentially one of the richest countries on earth, but colonialism, slavery and corruption have turned it into one of the poorest

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jacob Conklin's curator insight, May 6, 2015 1:04 PM

Geography talks a lot about the impact of globalization and imperialism. One of the best examples of this is found in The Democratic Republic of Congo. For its entire history, imperialist nations have sought out this country's resources and were not hesitant to exploit the population to accomplish this end. On of the great ironies in globalization is that the countries richest in resources are the most exploited. Take to the extreme as in Congo, the economy is so crushed that there is no way for the country to recover. 

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 4, 2015 4:09 PM

Its all about greed. If people only had the respect for each other then with all the natural resources on earth we all could live comfortably.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:40 PM

It's a shame to know that there's a country of hopelessness out there with a potential to be a great one. The long term causes of colonialism had a huge impact on their development as a modern country. They were once a great empire but was diminished down to nothing by the European. Hopefully there will light to the darkness of Congo in the near future.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography in the classroom
Scoop.it!

Smelly, contaminated, full of disease: the world’s open dumps are growing

Smelly, contaminated, full of disease: the world’s open dumps are growing | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Almost 40% of the world’s waste ends up in huge rubbish tips, mostly found near urban populations in poor countries, posing a serious threat to human health and the environment. John Vidal reports

Via dilaycock
more...
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 9, 2014 4:18 PM

Consequences of urbanisation in developing countries 

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 21, 2014 11:27 PM

Option topic: Urban environmental change and management

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

First taste of chocolate

"To be honest I do not know what they make of my beans," says farmer N'Da Alphonse. "I've heard they're used as flavoring in cooking, but I've never seen it. I do not even know if it's true." Watch how the Dutch respond to a cocoa bean in return or you can watch our entire episode on chocolate here.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 6:02 PM

this is an interesting demonstration of the disconnect between the consumer and the producer. we would consider chocolate to be the product these guys are producing, yet we forget that they only deal with it at the rawest level. something we see everyday is something as rare as gold to these guys.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:12 PM

how do these people not know what the crop they are producing is or tastes like? that is amazing to me how you can be so oblivious to what you are doing. and how the place that produces cocoa does not actually have access to it.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:15 AM

What is the geography of chocolate like?  This video was produced in the Netherlands, the global center of the cocoa trade, but the world's leading producer of cocoa is Côte d'Ivoire.  There is a dark side to chocolate production; the dirty secret is that slavery is commonplace on cocoa plantations in West Africa.  Although the worst of the situation is glossed over in this video, it still hints at the vast economic inequalities that are part and parcel of the global chocolate trade and the plantation roots of the production.  What are some of your reactions to this video?  


Tags: chocolate, Ivory Coast, Africa, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why caste still matters in India

Why caste still matters in India | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

INDIA’S general election will take place before May. The front-runner to be the next prime minister is Narendra Modi of the Bharatiya Janata Party, currently chief  minister of Gujarat. A former tea-seller, he has previously attacked leaders of the ruling Congress party as elitist, corrupt and out of touch. Now he is emphasising his humble caste origins. In a speech in January he said 'high caste' Congress leaders were scared of taking on a rival from 'a backward caste'. If Mr Modi does win, he would be the first prime minister drawn from the 'other backward classes', or OBC, group. He is not the only politician to see electoral advantage in bringing up the subject: caste still matters enormously to most Indians."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 8, 2015 9:18 PM

I agree that until there are more jobs created for the people of India, the slower the caste will fade out.  Over time it will fade out eventually, but the creation of jobs and more social interaction will help the process move along faster.  

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 15, 2015 2:51 PM

It was interesting to read about Modi's run for prime minister- I recently read a TIME magazine article about him, his original platform, and his subsequent work in office- and to see so much of Obama's run for office in Modi's struggle. Modi's support among his own caste, traditionally one that has been discriminated against in Indian society, is not at all different from Obama's support among the African American community. It goes to show that, for all our differences, people are a lot more alike then we'd care to think. Beyond that, it was interesting to see how much power the old caste system continues to hold in Indian society, much like the issues with race that Americans continue to struggle with within our own society. Appeals to different castes have been employed successfully by politicians and other forms of media; I once read that the most popular Indian films are often love stories revolving around "forbidden love" between two members of different, opposite castes. In a society that is so rich and complex, with hundreds of different languages and beliefs, it is so easy for lines to be drawn and for differences to be focused upon in a negative light. Happily for India, it has come a long way to address these problems and to move forward. While not perfect, India's future looks bright.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:34 PM

i dont understand how a country like india that is mostly modern and on the world scale can still have such an ancient system of labeling people be such a prominent practice in their society, i hope modi gets elected so he can start to eliminate this

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from myclassroom
Scoop.it!

The Ship-Breakers

The Ship-Breakers | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In Bangladesh men desperate for work perform one of the world’s most dangerous jobs.

Via Seth Dixon, Leigha Tew
more...
Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:58 AM

Besides that scrap metal pollutes water and rivers, this is a health risk for humans too. I also know someone who worked at Electric Boat at the Air Base in North Kingstown who's health was also affected due to metal scraps and particles in the air. Years later after working at EB he developed lung cancer. Metal erodes away as well, especially when left sitting in salt water. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:54 AM

this is both amazing and horrifying in what these people do on a daily basis. i cannot imagine doing what these guys do everyday, and i never imagined how taking apart one of these ships would work.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:16 AM

What happens to massive cargo vessels after they are outdated?  There are tons of scrap metal, but they aren't

designed to be taken apart.  The ship-breakers of South Asia (Bangladesh, India and Pakistan are 3 of the 4 global leaders in recycling ships) risk much to mine this resource.  This is an economic function that is a part of a globalized economy, but one than was never intended.  There are major health risks to the workers and pollutants to the local community that are endemic in this industry that manages to survive on the scraps of the global economy.


Tags: Bangladesh,  South Asia, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from myclassroom
Scoop.it!

Economic Decline and Sense of Place

"McDowell County, situated in the coalfields of West Virginia, has experienced a great boom-and-bust since 1950. But despite the economic decline and population loss, many still call it home and feel a great sense of purpose among the mountains. Residents speak about their connection to this place and the meaning of 'home.' Hear more stories at hollowdocumentary.com "


Via Seth Dixon, Leigha Tew
more...
dilaycock's curator insight, April 29, 2014 6:51 PM

Excellent example of urban decline. Would pair nicely with a reading from 'Rocket Boys' by Homer Hickam Jnr, or with the movie version 'October Sky.' The book and movie are the true story of a boy in Coalwood, West Virginia in the 1950s who is determined to  "escape" working in the coal mines to become a rocket scientist.

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, September 16, 2014 11:02 PM

 McDowell, a once thriving county in the 1950’s ceased to keep up with the ever-chaning world. There was little need for coal after the 1980’s so work became scarce and the “Brain Drain” began. Those looking for a successful future left for there was more choice elsewhere and economically it would make no sense to stay in McDowell. Nevertheless, cultural upbringings paved way to this "Boom and Bust” town, which gave people a sense of place and identity. Though McDowell is economically on the decline the communal relations and sense of place the community holds is still strong. 

Luke Walker's curator insight, October 3, 2014 3:41 AM

Develop your sense of place regarding the coalfields of West Virginia.

What geographic context (location) might create a place like McDowell County, West Virginia?

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Africa’s Charcoal Economy Is Cooking. The Trees Are Paying.

Africa’s Charcoal Economy Is Cooking. The Trees Are Paying. | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In Madagascar, the booming charcoal business is contributing to deforestation and may exacerbate the effects of global warming.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 27, 5:55 PM

Deforestation does not happen in a vacuum--it occurs in an economic, political, and historical context.  Rural Africans have less access to high value commodities and converting forests into charcoal is one of the few options (similar to the issue in Haiti).  The short-term economic gain for a few individuals leads to long-term environmental problems such as soil erosion, flooding, and habitat destruction for many species.  

 

Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, poverty, development, economic, labor, Madagascar, erosionAfrica, resourcespolitical ecology.

Andrew Poynter's curator insight, September 21, 9:58 PM
deforestation
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Cutting Haiti's Forests

The major environmental problem facing Haiti's biodiversity is explained, including video of tree-cutting within a national park.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 24, 3:50 PM

Deforestation does not happen in a vacuum--it occurs in an economic, political, and historical context.  Having successfully staged a slave revolution against France in 1806, they were ostracized from the global community (since the powers that be did not want to see slave rebellions or colonial uprising elsewhere) and were forced to look within for their own energy resources.  The nation's forests were (and still are) converted into charcoal, leading to long-term environmental problems such as soil erosion, flooding, and habitat destruction for many species.  All of this increased  increased Haiti's disaster vulnerability in the earthquake of 2010.     

 

Tags: Haiti, biogeography, environmentecology, video, poverty, development, economic, labor.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Ever-Expanding Slums

"Slums lack:

Permanent housingSufficient spaceClean waterSanitationPersonal safety
Via Seth Dixon
more...
L.Long's curator insight, May 5, 5:59 PM
World's Largest Slums
Rebecca Geevarghese's curator insight, May 8, 6:29 AM
Another GREAT resource to show to Geography students! 
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 2, 12:29 AM

The liveability of urban slums in the developing world makes an interesting study linking access to services and facilities, community identity, social connectedness, environmental quality and safety. 

 

Follow an introduction to slums using this video clip and 8.11 with the following resources that investigate the impact of rapid urbanisation on the liveability of cities.

 

Slums are a consequence of urbanisation studied in more depth  in Changing Places (Stage 9) - consequences of urbanisation. Limit the study of slums to liveability issues in stage 4 or an introduction to factors influencing liveability. 

 

GeoWorld 7 NSW

Chapter 7: Liveability:Measurement and environmental factors 

7.6 Access to shelter

Chapter 8 Urban, rural and remote places

8.6 An urban world

8.7 Why go to town?

8.8 Large cities attract people

8.10 Skyscrapers and slums

8.11 Kibera slums and flying toilets

Geothink people live in cities - Figure 8.14.3

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Mr. D's AP US History
Scoop.it!

Why Some Countries Are Poor and Others Rich

"The reason why some countries are rich and others poor depends on the quality of their institutions, the culture they have, the natural resources they find and what latitude they're on."

 

Tags: development, statistics, economic, globalization, poverty.


Via Seth Dixon, Michael Miller, AP US History
more...
Kaitlyn Evans's comment, July 30, 2015 5:24 AM
I'm not sure if I believe everything this video stated, however I think it is a good topic to analyze. I think it would be interesting to see how the rich countries became rich. They can't just have started on top. I also believe the rich countries abuse the poor countries because we can get goods/minerals/just about anything for a small price and then sell it in the rich country for much more.
Rob Duke's comment, July 30, 2015 3:34 PM
...certainly privilege from times past when there were no international watchdogs comes into play, but even when we control for colonialism, certain countries do much better than others. I'm inclined to think like Jared Diamond (The World Until Yesterday) and David Landes (The Wealth and Poverty of Nations. 1998) that institutions matter. If we protect property, provide vertical institutional support while also making room in the shadow of the law for ad hoc cooperation (see Elinor Ostrom's work), and protect intellectual property rights, we tend to have more wealth developed.
Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 14, 7:49 PM

I can't say I agree with all the arguments put forward in this video, it can still be a nice starting point to get students to critically analyze the ideas put forth and assess the merits of the claims being made.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from People and Development
Scoop.it!

Why Some Countries Are Poor and Others Rich

"The reason why some countries are rich and others poor depends on the quality of their institutions, the culture they have, the natural resources they find and what latitude they're on."

 

Tags: development, statistics, economic, globalization, poverty.


Via Seth Dixon, geographynerd
more...
Kaitlyn Evans's comment, July 30, 2015 5:24 AM
I'm not sure if I believe everything this video stated, however I think it is a good topic to analyze. I think it would be interesting to see how the rich countries became rich. They can't just have started on top. I also believe the rich countries abuse the poor countries because we can get goods/minerals/just about anything for a small price and then sell it in the rich country for much more.
Rob Duke's comment, July 30, 2015 3:34 PM
...certainly privilege from times past when there were no international watchdogs comes into play, but even when we control for colonialism, certain countries do much better than others. I'm inclined to think like Jared Diamond (The World Until Yesterday) and David Landes (The Wealth and Poverty of Nations. 1998) that institutions matter. If we protect property, provide vertical institutional support while also making room in the shadow of the law for ad hoc cooperation (see Elinor Ostrom's work), and protect intellectual property rights, we tend to have more wealth developed.
Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 14, 7:49 PM

I can't say I agree with all the arguments put forward in this video, it can still be a nice starting point to get students to critically analyze the ideas put forth and assess the merits of the claims being made.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from HMHS History
Scoop.it!

Mexico's 'maquiladora' labor system keeps workers in poverty

Mexico's 'maquiladora' labor system keeps workers in poverty | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Some four decades after welcoming foreign assembly plants and factories, known as maquiladoras, Mexico has seen only a trickle of its industrial and factory workers join the ranks of those who even slightly resemble a middle class." 

 

Despite making such consumer goods like BlackBerry smartphones, plasma TVs, appliances and cars that most people in the US, for instance, consider necessities, Mexican workers in these factories seldom get to enjoy these items because, as this article argues, the labor system keeps them in poverty.  Foreign investment in these businesses keep unions out and attracts workers from poorer areas, allowing low-cost labor to prevail.  Less than $8 a day is the going wage - great for the bottom line and consumer prices but very bleak for those who toil in this system.


Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO, Michael Miller
more...
Olga Varlamov's curator insight, November 23, 2013 8:26 PM

This article talks about how the maquiladora labor system dosen't provide enough money for it's workers. Many in Mexico are living in poverty and can't afford much more than dinner because of their low wages.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 4, 2014 12:47 PM

The labor system keeps workers in Poverty. This is the argument that is transitioned by stating the fact that many factory workers are and will always remian in poverty if they have no oppurtunity to move up in the food chain and become educated in order to get themselves out of poverty. They need different skills in order to aquire a better job to create a better life.  

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, February 11, 2015 11:33 PM

Its a very sad situation reading this. Seeing people go through all this to just survive. Kids don't even get any education and follow their parents footsteps to work at a plant just to be able to pay for bills. 8 dollars a day, and you wonder why they try to run to united states. Its very unfortunate that a lot of people go through this and i hope it changes soon, because to see that this is going on makes me thankful for what i have around me. Foreign investors are not great as they set out to be take advantage of the poor and get rich out of it, i think its pretty ridiculous.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
Scoop.it!

Imagine life without a proper toilet: that's the reality for 1 in 3 people

Imagine life without a proper toilet: that's the reality for 1 in 3 people | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
It’s 2014. So why do we still need World Toilet Day? Because 2.5 billion people still need one. World Toilet Day remains a critical means to raise awareness globally about one of the many important things…

Via dilaycock, FCHSAPGEO
more...
Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 24, 2015 1:10 AM

This article made me appreciate the fact that I have a toilet. Although I know that many people in world do not have toilets, I did not know the extent of the problems caused by the lack of toilets. It's sad to know that so many children are dying everyday from preventable illnesses that people in developed countries hardly know anyone can die from. I think a lot of the problems of lack of sanitation is caused by corrupt governments and inefficient international action. Although these supranational organizations give money to these poor countries to aid them in creating better sanitation systems, the corrupt governments in these countries use the money not on their own people, leaving the people to suffer more. What makes the problem worse is the fact that many of these countries without sanitation systems face the largest population booms, which worsens the issue of sanitation even more. 

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Today's Issues
Scoop.it!

Gender Empowerment and Education

"In this exclusive, unedited interview, 'I Am Malala' author Malala Yousafzai remembers the Taliban's rise to power in her Pakistani hometown and discusses her efforts to campaign for equal access to education for girls. Malala Yousafzai also offers suggestions for people looking to help out overseas and stresses the importance of education."


Via Seth Dixon, Mary Rack
more...
analise moreno's curator insight, October 14, 2014 8:01 PM

This was one of our focuses last chapter. I totally agree with this because woman and as well as men deserve education they need education to have a successful life. I like how she describes this so well and thoroughly she talks about what she wants and needs in her life.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 4:10 PM

unit 3 or 6

Raychel Johnson's curator insight, May 25, 2015 8:42 PM

Summary: In this interview, Jon Stewart talks with Malala Yousafzai, a girl who outwardly fought for women's education, and in doing so, was shot by the Taliban. Even now, she continues to fight for women's equality and their right to education, after she won her Nobel Peace Prize. 

 

Insight: In this interview, the main topic is gender equality, and how it can lead to better education for women, which, in turn, gives women more power. Although developed countries, especially in Western Europe, already display high gender equality, more developing countries, especially in the Middle East, have hardly anything close to gender equality. Even with low amounts of gender equality, people like Malala and advocates in Western countries are striving towards this goal of gender equality.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
Scoop.it!

16 Children & Their Bedrooms From Around the World…

16 Children & Their Bedrooms From Around the World… | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
What did your childhood bedroom look like? Chances are if you grew up in a westernized world, it had a solid bed, scattered toys, and wall decorations that creatively expressed the type of child you were, and hinted at the person you were to become. What you may have taken for granted, however, a large percent of others will never experience. There’s no right or wrong pertaining to living situations, but many unique lessons to be gained from acknowledging that the type of childhood one is given has an impressionable effect on their future.

Via dilaycock, FCHSAPGEO
more...
dilaycock's curator insight, September 15, 2014 8:20 PM

What a great way to connect with students and discuss issues such as lifestyle, living standards, health etc.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 18, 2014 5:34 AM

Personal geographies - perspectives and worldviews

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Poop Stories

Poop Stories | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"From the time we’re about 6 years old, everyone loves a good poop joke, right? But is there something more meaningful lurking beneath the bathroom banter? Take a look at some international potty humor and then follow the jokes to a deeper understanding. Every laugh on this page reflects a life and death issue: the very real sanitation problems facing India today."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, November 10, 2014 4:19 PM

It is fascinating that a country so many lives are lost due to something we find simple and trivial, and really do not even think about but use on a daily basis.

Jessica Robson Postlethwaite's curator insight, November 18, 2014 7:03 PM

World toilet day!

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 20, 2015 4:49 PM

Often when people are faced with a tragic fact they instantly attempt to shut it out because it makes them uncomfortable. In the same way Americans can walk past five homeless people a day and not bat and eye...its easier. Using comedy to address a dire situation such as India's sanitation standards, is an ingenious way to get people to actually listen

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Global Affairs & Human Geography Digital Knowledge Source
Scoop.it!

Portraits of people living on a dollar a day

Portraits of people living on a dollar a day | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"More than a billion people around the world subsist on a dollar a day, or less. The reasons differ but the day-to-day hardship of their lives are very similar. A book by Thomas A Nazario, founder of the International Organisation, documents the circumstances of those living in extreme poverty across the globe, accompanied by photographs from Pulitzer prizewinner Renée C Byer. Living On A Dollar a Day is published by Quantuck Lane."


Via Seth Dixon, Allison Anthony
more...
MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 4:47 PM

APHG-Unit 2 & Unit 6

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 11, 2014 8:26 PM

\I guess it's true what they say; a picture is worth a thousand words. Before even opening this article, you could get a sense from the picture that it wasn't going to be a good one. You can tell by their facial expressions and the environment that surrounds them. Even the colors that are portrayed in the picture send off meaning. The picture is not very bright. It sends off a sad image with all the brown everywhere. However, we do see a little peek of sunlight shining through. Before reading this, one might see this as a good sign from God, or someone watching over these people. Once I opened the article, there were many more pictures describing their lifestyles. You can tell that they don't make much money by the way they live. There was another picture in the article with a dark tint to it, representing a negative atmosphere, including one girl folding her arms and one girl with tears running down her face . There are no pictures were everyone in the images have smiles on their faces.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 7:18 PM

These picture paint a very sad and very real truth. Many of the people in the pictures are caring for children and barely have enough to make it through the day. One woman works long hours for about 50 cents a day and that is horrible, another woman is 40 years old and works at a construction site, which is obviously not the norm. These people, mainly the children, have hope of going to school, but for most of them that is just a dream that will never come true.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from DHS Social Studies
Scoop.it!

Where the extremely poor live

Where the extremely poor live | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon, Emily Ross Cook
more...
dilaycock's curator insight, May 5, 2014 8:52 PM

This information is taken from the World Bank's 2014 report "Prosperity for All." The report looks at "progress to date in reducing global poverty and discusses some of the challenges of reaching the interim target of reducing global poverty to 9 percent by 2020.... . It also reports on the goal of promoting shared prosperity, with a particular focus on describing various characteristics of the bottom 40 percent."

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:48 PM

This graphic reveals the poorest populations and where they live and even though India and China are economic competitors on the global stage they still have the poorest communities. 

IN poor communities, the human place is changed by using less structurally sound architecture and disregarding cultural presence for functionality though holding true to cultural presence in individual lives.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 11:49 AM

I agree with this article from the Guardian that development should be measured in human rights gains more than economic advancements.  While globalization is taking place and allowing countries to trade and maximize profits, a large percent of people in the world are deprived basic human rights and are entirely forgotten about and not valued.