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World Population Day Message 2014 - YouTube

On 11 July, as communities everywhere observe World Population Day, UNFPA is calling for investments in support of the largest-ever generation of youth.

 

For more information: http://www.unfpa.org/public/world-population-day/


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The Next America

The Next America | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Demographic transformations are dramas in slow motion. America is in the midst of two right now. Our population is becoming majority non-white at the same time a record share is going gray.

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Character Minutes's curator insight, April 20, 11:52 AM

Very interesting chart of how the demographics of U.S. Is changing.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 24, 11:25 AM

unit 2

CB New Hire Onboarding's curator insight, April 25, 9:35 AM

"The demographic shifts in the United States are transforming the cultural fabric of the country and this interactive feature from the Pew Research Center explores some of these changes.  Interracial marriage, declining fertility rates, migration, economic opportunities and politics are just some of the issues that can be seen in these excellent populations pyramids, charts, videos and graphs." - Seth Dixon 

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Population Bracketology

Try the Population Bracketology game from @uscensusbureau! Weekly data visualization from the U.S. Census Bureau compares populations for US states and metro areas. http://go.usa.gov/2nFR

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Our future in cities

Our future in cities | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Humanity's future is the future of cities. Explore the crowded favelas, greened-up blocks and futuristic districts that could shape the future of cities -- and take a profane, hilarious side trip to the suburbs.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 5, 8:08 PM

Cities are changing the world at a rapid rate.

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Will saving poor children lead to overpopulation?

Hans Rosling explains a very common misunderstanding about the world. CC by www.gapminder.org

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 27, 8:05 AM

Tags: population, demographic transition model, declining population, demographicsmodels, gapminderdevelopment.

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, January 28, 6:18 PM

A clear explanation of how saving the poor will slow population growth.

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Charting the Life Expectancies of the World's Countries

Charting the Life Expectancies of the World's Countries | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
If you want your newborn to live a long life, try traveling to Europe.

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Emma Boyle's curator insight, January 9, 8:37 AM

Fascinating statistics with engaging presentation.

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Yardstick of Wealth

"In the last of a series of programmes exploring global population for the award-winning This World strand, Rosling presents an 'as live' studio event featuring cutting-edge 3D infographics painting a vivid picture of a world that has changed in ways we barely understand – often for the better."


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Kibet Koskei's curator insight, November 2, 2013 4:19 AM

ATTENTION !
Get Paid To Enlighten African Youth On How To Use The Internet To Grow Rich ! Re: Ref:Jobs Are Moving Online, Lets Us Help You Acquire The Skills Of 21st Century and Help You To Be A head Of the Masses in Getting Online Jobs!
http://www.firstandfastcapital.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=690&Itemid=623

Sue Bicknell's curator insight, November 4, 2013 7:37 AM

Another fantastic presentation by Rosling

Rola Fahs's curator insight, November 13, 2013 10:27 AM

Rosling does a great job speaking of poverty and population. This would be an awesome text to use in a unit about poverty. This can be incorporated in a history class, economics class, sociology class, even an anthropology class if it is offered in highschools. 

It is a perfect length video that can be used to introduce a writing assignment, a research project, or an in class group assignment. But it also shows the extremety of poor vs. rich. From what I have seen students like to state their opinions about issues like this. Teachers may have to watch out how they introduce this into their topic or discussion, but it is a worthwhile source to use. 

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2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map

2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Alison Antonelli's curator insight, December 4, 2013 9:33 AM

The human popluation debate will always seem to be an issue. One can almost assume that the less developed countries are going to have the highest popluation but the most problems as well. A country that is classified as less developed are most definitely going to have low incomes due to the low number of jobs available, poor human development because there isn't enough people to be taking care of each other. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:28 AM

By looking at this data sheet you can see that the worlds population will increase by the millions in 2050. These populations will increase in areas that are already very populated and in areas that are not so heavily populated yet. 

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 7:00 PM

This is an interactive map where you can click the year you wish and see what the population is or will be. it allows a person to observe and understand population growth better.

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China Is Ending Its "One-Child Policy" - Here Are The Implications | Zero Hedge

China Is Ending Its "One-Child Policy" - Here Are The Implications | Zero Hedge | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Back in 1978, the Chinese politburo enacted the "one-child policy", whose main purpose was to "alleviate social, economic, and environmental problems" in China as a result of the soaring population.

Via Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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What Happens When China Runs Out Of Land For Its Population? It Buys Part Of Ukraine

What Happens When China Runs Out Of Land For Its Population? It Buys Part Of Ukraine | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
No, it's not the punchline to a joke. China is industrializing so rapidly that it's bought a chunk of Ukraine to help keep its population fed. A look at the new trend in international trade.

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dilaycock's curator insight, September 25, 2013 9:57 PM

An indication of things to come? International agriculture on a massive scale.

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1/5 of Humanity

1/5 of Humanity | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The world divided into 5 regions, each with the population of China."


Via Seth Dixon, Malmci@Spatialzone
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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, September 11, 2013 3:10 PM

Your thoughts...?

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:42 AM

This map is mind blowning to try to grasp. To think that India has an equvilant population to every country in the Americans has me dumbfounded. Then comparin the economic instability of India to all the economic juggernauts that fit into the light blue regions really shows how poor the distrubution of wealth and population is throught the world.

Trish Pearson's curator insight, April 9, 3:33 PM

A little perspective on population

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Understanding Global Statistics

Understanding Global Statistics | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Infographics to explain global statistics."


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Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, August 27, 2013 3:49 PM

Un conjunto de sencillas infografias para visualizar estadisticas de la humanidad en el tiempo presente

trampolinecalf's comment, September 27, 2013 2:46 AM
good one
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:11 PM

If the World was 100 People shows the statistics of the world as in smaller proportions allowing them to be easily visualized.

Some of the graphics divide the people into regions and nationalities mainly as Formal by continents .

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Population Density

Population Density | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"[This map's] an unabashedly generalized interactive population density map inspired/stolen from a map by William Bunge entitled Islands of Mankind that I came across on John Krygier‘s blog. I thought Bunge’s map was a novel way to look at population density, and I’ve tried to stay close to the spirit of the original."


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Kamaryn Hunt's comment, October 7, 2013 6:22 PM
I really liked this map, because it showed me how spread out we are. I actually didnt realize the world was THIS populated!
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 5:23 PM

This interactive map shows the varying intensities of population density, and the first thing that I thought of was how low the population density is in my hometown, compared to some of the bigger cities or areas around the world.  I am from a rural area of Rhode Island, and there are plenty of farms near my home, as well as woods and ponds.  It really is a beautiful area, which made me think that if population densities were so high- the maximum density on the interactive map was over 500 people per square kilometer- that there would  be less room for the beauty of the natural world in those densely populated areas.  I grew up playing in my woods, and I am always shocked by city-dwellers that live in places where their yards have one or two trees (and are considered to live in 'woodsy' areas of their towns), or have no yards at all.  My town has a low population density, and much of the land is occupied by the reservoir, farms, and woodland areas that are not permissible for development.  Although my hometown is not a city, it serves the more populated areas- such as Providence- by providing water to their city.  It seems the more populated areas drain the surrounding areas of their natural beauty and resources.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:31 PM

Mindblowing interractive map dealing with the population desinty of the world.  From tinkering around with this ive seen some scary things. As we all know the North East metropolis area is compact with people from rhode island to delaware and everything in between. but when you take the map to 100 people per square to kilomete it almost disapears. This in itself wouldnt be that bad but when you move the image to 500 per kilometer almost the entireity of India is still there. This is a perfect compaitive example of how jam packed south eastern asia is and its actually pretty scary.

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NOVA | Human Numbers Through Time

NOVA | Human Numbers Through Time | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Examine global population growth over the past two millennia, and see what's coming in the next 50 years.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 8, 9:47 AM

Good visual on population growth over time

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Bye-Bye, Baby

Bye-Bye, Baby | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Birthrates are falling around the world. And that’s O.K.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, April 5, 11:23 PM

Baby boom,  baby bust. What the future holds. 

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Highly concentrated population distribution

Highly concentrated population distribution | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Only 2% of Australia's population lives in the yellow area. "


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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 6:06 PM

Only 2% of Australia's population lives in the yellow area which is very surprising because who is living in the rest of the area in Australia. What is happening to the natural sources and the resources that help the economy and where do they fit in especially in this map. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 10:02 PM

Coastal living is what Australia's all about. Why go to Australia to live away from the ocean? The major cities are all located on the coasts so thats where people want to be. Thats where every major event is taking place and where they can get all their resources needed to live.

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 7:16 PM

This article shows how population distribution is uneven. 

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World Population Prospects

World Population Prospects | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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LeeBurns's curator insight, February 11, 5:20 AM

#unit4 #population

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 1:27 PM

This graph depicts the estimated population growth throughtout the years of 1950-2100. Age has a lot to do with the increasing rate by millions. The people that are 65+ represented in the green are "peaking old" at 2080. As for the 15-64 age braket they are represented in the red and are reaching the "Adult peak" at the year 2030. And lastly, the "Peak Child" is represented in the blue achieves that in 1990. All of these statistics stem from the Brazilian records and are relative to the daily life and climate of the specific group or individual.

Albert Jordan's curator insight, February 12, 5:56 PM

Looking at the statistics for South America’s growth rate since 1950, it has grown rapidly. This rapid growth can easily be attributed to modernization, increased stability within the governments(even if corruption is still rampant in some places and the U.S. isn’t fiddling its fingers in politics or funding government overthrows), and increased outside development thanks to increased global globalization. While total population of the region is expected to rise until it peaks in 2050, so is population density and age. This will create sanitation, infrastructure, and healthcare issues that many parts of the continent may not be ready to address or able to. Even though economic strength is typically on the rise, these are still poorer developing nations. The birthrate is already beginning to peak and taper off even if deaths continue to rise. However, there is still predicted to be more births than death. Improved healthcare globally since 1950 has found its way into South America and so has economic output, bringing with it – immigration. Numbers such as South America’s can be used to create a visual representation by using a population pyramid to figure out which phase of the demographic transition model the region, or with more specific numbers, a country was in, is going into, and will predicable be in.

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▶ MALTHUS AND POPULATION : TEN MINUTE GUIDE - YouTube

A ten minute guide to the 18th/19th century English classical economist Malthus and his theory of population. Produced for the history and context of journal...

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Watch The World Grow Older In 4 GIFs

Watch The World Grow Older In 4 GIFs | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Some countries are getting old. Others are staying young — and getting much bigger.

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CHS AP Human Geography's curator insight, December 14, 2013 11:00 AM

A cool look at the DTM and population pyramids

RobersonWG's curator insight, December 27, 2013 10:52 PM

Read the article and review the GIF image data.  Think of these as non-gender specific population pyramids.  How would you explain the growth in our older population age ranges 50+?  Why such a growth in older people and a decline in younger people?

Noah Duncan's curator insight, January 13, 5:44 PM

There are many countries that are growing old. The United States of America isn't as much as Japan. Japan must have a low fertility rate because there are more elders. There are some countries that are not getting older Like Nigeria. Nigeria has a very high fertility rate, and children are a huge share of the people in those countries.

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Thomas Malthus and Population Growth

Learn more: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=r1ywppAJ1xs Thomas Malthus's views on population. Malthusian limits.

 

This is a succinct (but not perfect) summary of Malthusian ideas on population.  What do you think of his ideas?  Any specific parts of his theory that you agree with?  Do you disagree with some of his ideas?  What did history have to say about it?  

 

Tags: Demographics, population, models, APHG,  unit 2 population. 


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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, October 25, 2013 11:01 PM

We will be learning about Malthus in Chapter 2.  Take a sneek peek!

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 11:57 AM

The Malthusian ideas maintain that food growth is only linear, while population growth is geometric, so soon population will outgrow food production and famines will occur,

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 7:12 PM

This video very well explains the malthusian theory and how it is associated with population

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China Is Ending Its "One-Child Policy" - Here Are The Implications | Zero Hedge

China Is Ending Its "One-Child Policy" - Here Are The Implications | Zero Hedge | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Back in 1978, the Chinese politburo enacted the "one-child policy", whose main purpose was to "alleviate social, economic, and environmental problems" in China as a result of the soaring population.

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Fertility Rates in Gapminder

Fertility Rates in Gapminder | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"CATHOLIC Argentina, Mexico & Phillippines have more babies born per woman than MUSLIM Indonesia, Iran & Turkey."


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Mathijs Booden's comment, September 28, 2013 3:03 PM
Any mention of Gapminder gets an upvote from me. One of the best resources in and outside of the classroom, period.
jon inge's curator insight, October 11, 2013 5:20 PM

awesome site for development economics

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 6:15 PM

When watching the video it was apparetnt that for Iran during the 1950-early1970's there was an increase in fertility and then decreased to almost 1.32% in 2010. These facts were very interseting to see and the way that we as historians/ georgraphers can predict the future with the past facts.

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Should we be worried?


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Mathijs Booden's comment, September 21, 2013 4:58 AM
Our current predicament in terms of resource depletion, pollution and climate change is mainly due to the industrialized lifestyle of the minority of the world population. Obviously, that's not a result of overpopulation per se.

However, population growth stops when living standards rise. We can't stabilize at 10 billion unless all 10 billion enjoy a reasonable standard of living. Given that even our current resource use is unsustainable, overpopulation is a real issue.
Hongsheng Li's curator insight, September 22, 2013 11:18 PM

人口资源环境承载力

人口过度 or 消费过度

Blake Welborn's curator insight, October 7, 2013 12:49 PM

This fits in well with our population chapter now as this is warning of over population. As the population increases so does need for food, which increases global agriculture and pollution

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Declining Fertility Rates

Declining Fertility Rates | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The American birthrate is at a record low. What happens when having it all means not having children?

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Zakkary Catera's comment, September 13, 2013 12:36 AM
Children are our legacy, they are our future, and if the birth rate keeps depleting then who will be here to be pur next scientists or doctors? Then again a plus to this situation is how much lower the birth rate is, the more resources we have to equally share (i.e oil, food water etc.)
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:34 AM

In recent research people found that some women are content with not having any children. People might think this way because without a child people are able to do more things like go out or travel. Some may not want children due to expenses. If more people do not want children birth rates could decline over the years.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:23 PM

Not to bulky on information but it gets its point across. why are theyre so many social stigmas around having a kid?  A kid cost a little over a million dollars to raise why should it be looked down apon for choosing not to take the finacial and physical hardship. I personally have been on the fence about the subject because Im not a fan of this world is coming to and i wouldnt want to have someone I dearly care about to have to go through it. But thats neither hear nor there. 

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In China, one-child policy compounds loss of child for parents

In China, one-child policy compounds loss of child for parents | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
One-child policy leaves some parents childless, hopeless and facing financial ruin in old age.

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Antonio Martinez's comment, September 12, 2013 3:36 PM
I can understand why this law is enforced. The obvious reason is that China has an unusually high population compared to other countries. Although, this law definitely has it's downsides. One being that if your child dies such as in the car accident in the beginning of the article, then you will be childless for the rest of your life.
jacob benner's comment, September 14, 2013 5:11 PM
China is overpopulated and it its becoming a problem, but by forcing parents to only have one child is leading to other problems. The childless parents describe there life to be empty and full of depression and without their child they are running into financial issues. Most of the time it is to late for the parents to have another child.
Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 5:43 PM

I understand the issues China is having with their large population but the one-child policy hurts the average family. Problems occur when a family can only have one child. If anything were to happen to that child, whether he/she dies young, runs away or gets thrown in prison. That can leave the parents vulnerable later in life. When the parents become elderly they may not have a child to take care of them. China must find another way to control their population.