AP HUMAN GEOGRAPH...
Follow
Find tag "population"
5.3K views | +2 today
AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Mrs. Watson's Class
Scoop.it!

5 ways Europe is trying to convince its citizens to make more babies

5 ways Europe is trying to convince its citizens to make more babies | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In Denmark, teachers encourage their students to someday make babies as well as practice safe sex.

Via Nancy Watson
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from AP Human Geography
Scoop.it!

What is the future of the world's religions?

According to new Pew Research demographic projections, by 2050 there will be near parity between Muslims (2.8 billion, or 30% of the population) and Christians (2.9 billion, or 31%), possibly for the first time in history. Read more at http://pewrsr.ch/projections.

Via Seth Dixon, Dustin Fowler
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 2, 1:43 PM

This video is a sneak peak at some of the statistical projections from the Pew Research Center on what the world of religion will look like in 2050.  Here are the other highlights: 

  • The number of Muslims will nearly equal the number of Christians around the world.
  • Atheists, agnostics and other people who do not affiliate with any religion – though increasing in countries such as the United States and France – will make up a declining share of the world’s total population.
  • The global Buddhist population will be about the same size it was in 2010, while the Hindu and Jewish populations will be larger than they are today.
  • In Europe, Muslims will make up 10% of the overall population.
  • India will retain a Hindu majority but also will have the largest Muslim population of any country in the world, surpassing Indonesia.
  • In the United States, Christians will decline from more than three-quarters of the population in 2010 to two-thirds in 2050, and Judaism will no longer be the largest non-Christian religion. Muslims will be more numerous in the U.S. than people who identify as Jewish on the basis of religion.
  • Four out of every 10 Christians in the world will live in sub-Saharan Africa.


Tags: religionpopulation, culture, unit 3 culture.

Alex Lewis's curator insight, April 6, 10:07 AM

The changing religion percentages expected for 2050 show how the world is changing in terms of ethnicity and religion. Muslims will make up about the same percentage as Christians do, which is surprising to me. Hindu and Jewish populations will continue to grow sufficiently, while Buddhism will remain the same. 

 

                                            -A.L.

Alan Frumkin's curator insight, April 7, 7:11 PM

añada su visión ...

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Damage from cancelled Canadian census as bad as feared

Damage from cancelled Canadian census as bad as feared | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The cancellation of the mandatory long-form census has damaged research in key areas, from how immigrants are doing in the labour market to how the middle class is faring, while making it more difficult for cities to ensure taxpayer dollars are being spent wisely, planners and researchers say.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 2, 11:25 PM

Canada got rid of the mandatory census, and is discovering it can no longer know much about itself. 


Tag: Canada, populationcensus.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Mrs. Watson's Class
Scoop.it!

The World’s 10 Fastest Growing Metropolitan Areas

The World’s 10 Fastest Growing Metropolitan Areas | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
With only 20 percent of the population, the world’s 300 largest metropolitan economies account for nearly half of global economic output. Through our new Global MetroMonitor report and interactive, users can understand the individual trajectories of the world’s large metropolitan economies and gain new insights into sources of growth that national or regional assessments tend to obscure.

Via Nancy Watson
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from AP Human GeographyNRHS
Scoop.it!

China's Urban Population Now Exceeds 50% of Population

China's Urban Population Now Exceeds 50% of Population | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
China's Urban Population Now Exceeds 50% of Population.

 

China has historically been a predominantly rural country; a major part of the economic growth of the last few decades has been driven my a push towards urbanization.   Now that China is predominantly an urban population, what will that been for resource consumption, development and global economics? 


Via Seth Dixon, Karen Moles Rose
more...
Sabrina Gam's curator insight, May 5, 2013 5:00 AM

China & its population is something that we as geographers must be aware of; this ever growing population of people will play a large part to our human geogrpahy. 

Rachael Johns's curator insight, September 9, 2014 6:15 PM

The population in China is still exceeding in spite of the safety regulations that they've set to limit their population growth. With their population being 20% of the worlds population China is the most populous country in the world. One in five people is a resident of China, but with recent studies statistics show that by 2040 India will exceed 1.52 billion. ~R.J~

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:26 AM

We constantly talk about the one child policy - this is also another near future concern in China.  

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from People and Development
Scoop.it!

A World With 11 Billion People? New Population Projections Shatter Earlier Estimates

A World With 11 Billion People? New Population Projections Shatter Earlier Estimates | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"In a paper published Thursday in Science, demographers from several universities and the United Nations Population Division conclude that instead of leveling off in the second half of the 21st century, as the UN predicted less than a decade ago, the world's population will continue to grow beyond 2100."


Via Seth Dixon, geographynerd
more...
Miles Gibson's curator insight, December 21, 2014 9:25 PM
Unit 2 population and migration
This article releases threatening information about how the world's population is going to keep expanding for another hundred years or more. This could mean a few billion more people on earth. This will make our water and food supply not be able to support the population.
This article relates to unit 2 because it proves that malthus's theories may be correct. The world may become to large for it's food supply and overgrow the earth. Also that the population expansion is a key concept of unit 2 overall relating this article to unit 2.
Caroline Ivy's curator insight, March 14, 5:41 PM

This unit focuses on immigration and population. This article shows the aftermath of both. 

 

The Earth's population is currently at about 7.1 billion people. By the time people of my generation are old and ailing, we'll be at about a 35% increase! We can't even feed ourselves now. How will we feed 11 Billion? 

 

Scientists stress the importance of education—especially women in developing countries—and believe the problem can be controlled and dealt with. 

 

There are many issues that are sure to come in the advancing years—regarding ethics, politics, human rights, of course—but there is no way to be sure. 

 

Buckle Up, everyone. It's gonna be a bumpy ride. 

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 24, 1:23 AM

It is interesting to see the demographic transition model in real life effect. As time passes, underdeveloped countries will enter stage 3 of the demographic transition model and see a decline in birth rate and death rate remains relatively low. Most developing countries now will enter the very end of stage 3 and even stage 4 as birth rates balance of death rates. The real question is whether or not Earth will be able to sustain 11 billion people. It is scary to see the world in a rapid population boom. This population growth relates to the agricultural unit in that the use of GMO's is to accommodate the rapidly growing populations in the world.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from SoRo class
Scoop.it!

Population pyramids: Powerful predictors of the future

"Population statistics are like crystal balls -- when examined closely, they can help predict a country's future (and give important clues about the past). Kim Preshoff explains how using a visual tool called a population pyramid helps policymakers and social scientists make sense of the statistics, using three different countries' pyramids as examples."


Via Seth Dixon, Clairelouise
more...
Nancy Watson's curator insight, September 26, 2014 4:04 PM

Population unit

Lauren Quincy's curator insight, March 20, 1:51 PM

Unit 2: Population and Migration

 

This video was about how demographers categorize data and analyze it. This video showed a few different population pyramids in order to show differences in population in different countries. It showed China as an example and pointed out the remnants of the one child policy 35 years before and how the number of men were higher due to sex selective abortions. They also talked about how the population pyramids could show what stage in the demographic transition model a country was in and how they use them to predict future patterns and changes. 

 

This relates to unit 2 because it covers topics such as population change, demographic transition models, sex composition, population policies and much more. Population pyramids are very useful due to the visualization of sex, age and number composition in a countries population. They are very important in the use of predicting the future change in population because it can tell what the population has gone through in the past and what to expect in the DTM. 

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 10:43 PM

This video illustrates how population pyramids have the ability to show how populations will rise and fall over time. Pyramids specifically show the population based on a specific age, and illustrates a country's amount of young people in comparison to the elderly. 

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Local Population Pyramids

Local Population Pyramids | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mrs. Karnowski-Simul's curator insight, August 27, 2014 7:13 AM

1G Theme 2: 6 Billion people and me

CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 2014 8:27 PM

Useful for explaining population pyramids.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 16, 2014 12:08 PM

Unit 2

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Mrs. Watson's Class
Scoop.it!

NOVA | Human Numbers Through Time

NOVA | Human Numbers Through Time | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Examine global population growth over the past two millennia, and see what's coming in the next 50 years.

Via Nancy Watson
more...
Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 8, 2014 9:47 AM

Good visual on population growth over time

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 22, 2014 10:45 PM

Unit 2

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Mrs. Watson's Class
Scoop.it!

Bye-Bye, Baby

Bye-Bye, Baby | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Birthrates are falling around the world. And that’s O.K.

Via Nancy Watson
more...
Nancy Watson's curator insight, April 5, 2014 11:23 PM

Baby boom,  baby bust. What the future holds. 

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Spatial literacy
Scoop.it!

Highly concentrated population distribution

Highly concentrated population distribution | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Only 2% of Australia's population lives in the yellow area. "


Via Seth Dixon, Malmci@Spatialzone
more...
Jason Schneider's curator insight, April 9, 11:14 PM

Apparently, 2% of Australia's population lives mostly away from the coast between Australia and the ocean. Even though many countries have people who mostly live closer to the coast rather than closer to the middle at any given country, Australia has one of the lowest percentages of people living away from the coast that separates its country and the ocean. The main reason why many people rather live near the coast of a country is obviously because it's closer to the water. People rather live near the coast for fishing activities, farming and accessing to world trade. Also as you can see, most of the eastern part of Australia has many people that live in Australia. In that case, there are many tourists from Oceanic islands that visit the east side of Australia seeing as Oceania is east of Australia. Lastly, the middle/yellow area of Australia contains many desert areas and open grasslands so people would barely be able to live in that region.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 28, 5:49 PM

This seems to look like how many countries in the world are settled, with high populations in certain locations of a country along a coast line.  Its obvious here in Austrailia that there is a low population in the Outback since it can be very hot in this desert area and not a lot of vegitation or rainfall for agriculture.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, May 4, 10:59 PM

After looking at the pictures from Buzzfeed, I can totally understand why people don't live in too many places in Australia.  The snakes alone are enough to make me never even want to visit.  Australians have to watch their backs every time they leave the house.  That is not something that float my boat.  Also, even if there aren't enough reptiles to get you grossed out, the hail could kill ya!

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Mrs. Watson's Class
Scoop.it!

World Population Prospects

World Population Prospects | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon, Nancy Watson
more...
LeeBurns's curator insight, February 11, 2014 5:20 AM

#unit4 #population

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 2014 1:27 PM

This graph depicts the estimated population growth throughtout the years of 1950-2100. Age has a lot to do with the increasing rate by millions. The people that are 65+ represented in the green are "peaking old" at 2080. As for the 15-64 age braket they are represented in the red and are reaching the "Adult peak" at the year 2030. And lastly, the "Peak Child" is represented in the blue achieves that in 1990. All of these statistics stem from the Brazilian records and are relative to the daily life and climate of the specific group or individual.

Albert Jordan's curator insight, February 12, 2014 5:56 PM

Looking at the statistics for South America’s growth rate since 1950, it has grown rapidly. This rapid growth can easily be attributed to modernization, increased stability within the governments(even if corruption is still rampant in some places and the U.S. isn’t fiddling its fingers in politics or funding government overthrows), and increased outside development thanks to increased global globalization. While total population of the region is expected to rise until it peaks in 2050, so is population density and age. This will create sanitation, infrastructure, and healthcare issues that many parts of the continent may not be ready to address or able to. Even though economic strength is typically on the rise, these are still poorer developing nations. The birthrate is already beginning to peak and taper off even if deaths continue to rise. However, there is still predicted to be more births than death. Improved healthcare globally since 1950 has found its way into South America and so has economic output, bringing with it – immigration. Numbers such as South America’s can be used to create a visual representation by using a population pyramid to figure out which phase of the demographic transition model the region, or with more specific numbers, a country was in, is going into, and will predicable be in.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Mrs. Watson's World History
Scoop.it!

▶ MALTHUS AND POPULATION : TEN MINUTE GUIDE - YouTube

A ten minute guide to the 18th/19th century English classical economist Malthus and his theory of population. Produced for the history and context of journal...

Via Nancy Watson
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Japan's Disappearing Villages

Japan's Disappearing Villages | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In the small town of Nagoro, population 35, one woman is trying to save her village from extinction by creating life-sized dolls for every inhabitant who either dies or moves away.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, April 12, 3:53 PM

Okay very creepy but the woman trying to save her village from extinction due to  urban migration. It kind of reminds of me a Native American tribe in a similar fashion because it shows the power and history of the village and the connection it has with her. So by creating life sized dolls for the people who either died or moved away kind of creates a certain spirit of that person in whom stays behind with her, leaving the village the same, even if its actually not their physically but spiritually the tradition of their place still remains and the history would continue to live on very deep and interesting.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 16, 2:13 PM

I was both slightly creeped out by this article, as well as moved by it.  Urbanization has been increasingly going on in Japan.  In fact, when I think of the country, I think of the hustle and crowds of Tokyo.  Another factor playing into Japan's villages disappearing is that the birth rates in Japan are very low, in fact the country is losing population due to the fact that more people are dying than being born.  Viewing this town, it was pretty sad to see the dolls recreating scenes that living people once did in this town.  It is also eery because these dolls stay in the same position doing the same thing forever, it is kind of like a museum of what life was once like in a dying town.  It must be a hard thing to see happening to a place where one's family have lived for generations. 

 

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 1:43 PM

Due to urban migration, this village of Nagoro is said to be one of 10,000 small towns that will disappear in Japan.  I've been to some small towns in Japan and can say there is so much more culture in these villages than there is in the big cities.  I got a totally different feeling in my sole than when I ended my trip in Tokyo.  While both parts of the country have its pros and cons, it is terrible to think that these villages will be defeated to the rise of urbanism.   

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Mrs. Watson's Class
Scoop.it!

Are you ignorant about the world? - CNN.com

Are you ignorant about the world? - CNN.com | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The world is spinning so fast that it can be hard to keep track of everything going on. And most of us aren't doing a good job of it, writes Hans Rosling.

Via Nancy Watson
more...
Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 9, 9:19 PM

Keeping up with global trends can be daunting. 

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Italy is a 'dying country' says minister as birth rate plummets

Italy is a 'dying country' says minister as birth rate plummets | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
New figures show the lowest total number of births since the formation of the modern Italian state

 

Fewer babies were born in Italy in 2014 than in any other year since the modern Italian state was formed in 1861, new data show, highlighting the demographic challenge faced by the country’s chronically sluggish economy.  National statistics office ISTAT said on Thursday the number of live births last year was 509,000, or 5,000 fewer than in 2013, rounding off half a century of decline.  The number of babies born to both natives and foreigners living in Italy dropped as immigration, which used to support the overall birth rate, tumbled to its lowest level for five years.

 

Tag: Italy, Europe, declining populations, population, demographic transition model.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 7:52 PM

Summary: This article basically confirms the DTM. It talks about how because of Italy's wealth there population may cease to exist in the far future.

 

Insight: This article not only has a lot to do with the DTM, but it also analyzes several factors affecting population.

Avery Liardon's curator insight, March 23, 8:40 PM

Unit 2: 

Italy continues to round off half a century of declines in births. Recent statistics show that the countries birth rates are at the lowest rate they have been since the formation of the modern Italian state. 

Emily Coats's curator insight, March 24, 11:53 AM

UNIT 2 POPULATION

This article is very informative on the current situation in Italy. Fewer babies were born in 2014 than in any other year since 1861, and this is said to be connected to the country's "sluggish economy". Immigration, a factor that previously contributed to the birth rate in Italy, has been at its lowest in five years. People in Italy are dying, and there are not enough births to balance out the country. As a result, the country is so called "dying". The government of Prime Minister Matteo Renzi is trying very hard boost the economy by reforming the labour market and trying to convince young adults to stay in Italy rather than working abroad. This whole conflict in Italy involves the promotion of population growth in a country, because the country is dying and needs a more stable population.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography
Scoop.it!

The changing shape of world demographics

Animating the changing shape of the world population pyramid. For more multimedia content from The Economist visit our website: http://econ.st/1xqEZhX.


Via Seth Dixon, Luke Gray
more...
Olivier Tabary's curator insight, November 28, 2014 12:08 PM

Spectacular changes in global demographics, a bit scaring to be honest

Bex Swaney's curator insight, December 5, 2014 12:27 PM

Growth of the ageing population, population change as a whole

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 10:47 AM

unit 2

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from SoRo class
Scoop.it!

International Migration

Almost everywhere on the world, international migration is a hot topic. Most of the time the debate about migration is fierce and charged with prejudices and...

Via Natalie K Jensen, Nancy Watson, Seth Dixon, Clairelouise
more...
Sierra_Mcswagger's curator insight, September 10, 2014 10:02 AM

This video is primarily talking on the widely known topic of migration. 3 percent of the worlds population is living away from there place of birth. The push of migration from places include poverty, war, and environmental disasters. The migration pull in some places are because of  economic opportunity, and political freedom. Migration is increasing, and is thought of as a bad thing.(s.s.)

Aurora Rider's curator insight, October 7, 2014 8:59 PM

This video is great for going over the many different aspects that go along with migration. It talks about what migration is and the reasons why people migrate known as push and pull factors. It talks about the different types of migration such as asylum seakers and illegal immigration. It mentions the disadvantages and advantages of migration.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:27 PM

A great YouTube video- discussing the controversy of international migration among other things that fall into place of the disapproval of international migration. -UNIT 2 

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Pro-Natalist Policies

"No one has found out how to help Denmark's falling birth rate. Until now. Spies Travels announces a competition where you have to make a baby to win."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 14, 2014 4:26 AM

Pro-Natalist Policies

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 27, 2014 10:41 AM

This shows what Pro-Natalism looks like in the 21st century. Youtube videos, and competitions that can go viral and trending. I find it interesting how these policies are trying to gain traction through video campaigns with sexy models and catchy slogans like "Do it for Demark". Population geography can be a key indicator of the characteristics of a country or nation. Denmark knows they need to counter a falling birthrate in order to stay growing this is definatly a modern way of going about that.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, March 4, 9:58 PM

Sex sells everything, even making babies!

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

America is rapidly aging in a country built for the young

America is rapidly aging in a country built for the young | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Although we seldom think about them this way, most American communities as they exist today were built for the spry and mobile. We've constructed millions of multi-story, single-family homes where the master bedroom is on the second floor, where the lawn outside requires weekly upkeep, where the mailbox is a stroll away. We've designed neighborhoods where everyday errands require a driver's license. We've planned whole cities where, if you don't have a car, it's not particularly easy to walk anywhere — especially not if you move gingerly.

This reality has been a fine one for a younger country. Those multi-story, single-family homes with broad lawns were great for Baby Boomers when they had young families. And car-dependent suburbs have been fine for residents with the means and mobility to drive everywhere. But as the Baby Boomers whose preferences drove a lot of these trends continue to age, it's becoming increasingly clear that the housing and communities we've built won't work very well for the old."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, October 18, 2014 6:48 PM

This is also an issue in Australia where the overwhelming majority of people live in single story dwellings and are very car reliant.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, January 28, 8:59 PM

I can definitely see this as a real problem. Both my Uncle and my Great Uncle moved their condos from ones that had numerous steps to climb to the second floor to more elder-friendly options. My Great Uncle even went a step further to move him and his wife to a senior living community, where there food, entertainment, etc. is all provided within an enclosed neighbourhood with other people of their age group. More of these communities that act like oversized retirement homes could be the answer. They give the illusion of suburban living, something the baby boomers liked, while providing the accessibility they need.

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, April 8, 12:27 PM

APHG- HW Option 1

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Southmoore AP Human Geography
Scoop.it!

World Population Day Message 2014 - YouTube

On 11 July, as communities everywhere observe World Population Day, UNFPA is calling for investments in support of the largest-ever generation of youth.

 

For more information: http://www.unfpa.org/public/world-population-day/


Via Mr. David Burton
more...
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from ApocalypseSurvivalSkills
Scoop.it!

The Next America

The Next America | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Demographic transformations are dramas in slow motion. America is in the midst of two right now. Our population is becoming majority non-white at the same time a record share is going gray.

Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
more...
CB New Hire Onboarding's curator insight, April 25, 2014 9:35 AM

"The demographic shifts in the United States are transforming the cultural fabric of the country and this interactive feature from the Pew Research Center explores some of these changes.  Interracial marriage, declining fertility rates, migration, economic opportunities and politics are just some of the issues that can be seen in these excellent populations pyramids, charts, videos and graphs." - Seth Dixon 

Amanda Morgan's comment, September 18, 2014 10:46 AM
The demographic shifts will most definitely have an impact on politics and economic opportunities. With as many 85 year olds as 5 year olds, we will see an increase in the need for health care and general overall care for the elderly. There will be more need for social security and retirement plans. While it is a good thing overall that life expectancy is increasing, it may create other issues.
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:48 AM

The demographic shifts will most definitely have an impact on politics and economic opportunities. With as many 85 year olds as 5 year olds, we will see an increase in the need for health care and general overall care for the elderly. There will be more need for social security and retirement plans. While it is a good thing overall that life expectancy is increasing, it may create other issues.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from SoRo class
Scoop.it!

Population Bracketology

Try the Population Bracketology game from @uscensusbureau! Weekly data visualization from the U.S. Census Bureau compares populations for US states and metro areas. http://go.usa.gov/2nFR

Via Clairelouise
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Mrs. Watson's Class
Scoop.it!

Our future in cities

Our future in cities | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Humanity's future is the future of cities. Explore the crowded favelas, greened-up blocks and futuristic districts that could shape the future of cities -- and take a profane, hilarious side trip to the suburbs.

Via Nancy Watson
more...
Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 5, 2014 8:08 PM

Cities are changing the world at a rapid rate.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Lyman AP Human Geography
Scoop.it!

Will saving poor children lead to overpopulation?

Hans Rosling explains a very common misunderstanding about the world. CC by www.gapminder.org

Via Seth Dixon, Brian Caldwell, Mariette Herro Juster
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 27, 2014 8:05 AM

Tags: population, demographic transition model, declining population, demographicsmodels, gapminderdevelopment.

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, January 28, 2014 6:18 PM

A clear explanation of how saving the poor will slow population growth.