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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Don’t make bicyclists more visible. Make drivers stop hitting them.

Don’t make bicyclists more visible. Make drivers stop hitting them. | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Mandatory helmet laws and glow-in-the-dark spray paint just show who really owns the roads.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 7, 12:23 PM

This op-ed is good discussion fodder to discuss the urban planning preferences embedded within our transportation choices. 

 

Tagsop-ed, urban, transportation, planning.

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Global Cities

"The evolving role of cities and regions presents planning challenges as urban areas are work to achieve particular social, economic and environmental goals. This video explores a range of cities to examine how fully integrated planning, design, engineering and management capabilities can help to improve cities."

 

Tags: urban, planning, urbanism, architecture.


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Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, November 15, 2015 7:41 PM

An advertisement but interesting

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Can you identify these world cities from their street plans alone?

Can you identify these world cities from their street plans alone? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
We’ve stripped out the street names and lost the labels – but can you still recognise the cities from their aerial views?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 30, 2015 1:22 PM

This is a fun map quiz that is part memory, but also relies on pattern recognition to see if you can understand the urban morphology that shaped these places.  I got 11 out of 13...can anybody top that?  I'm sure someone can; give it a shot.  


Tagsplanning, architecture, urban, regions, trivia, games.

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New Old Town

New Old Town | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Like many cities in Central Europe, Warsaw is made up largely of grey, ugly, communist block-style architecture. Except for one part:  The Old Town. Walking through the historic district, it’s just like any other quaint European city. There are tourist shops, horse-drawn carriage rides, church spires. The buildings are beautiful—but they are not original."


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aitouaddaC's curator insight, August 3, 2015 8:12 AM

This is a compelling podcast linking architecture, heritage, political ideology and the built environment.  How we preserve and create place is put on trial as to when something is benign, fabricated, authentic, or simply a complicated balance between opposing forces. 

 

Tags: planning, architecture, urban, place,

Beth Marinucci's curator insight, August 3, 2015 8:45 PM

This is a compelling podcast linking architecture, heritage, political ideology and the built environment.  How we preserve and create place is put on trial as to when something is benign, fabricated, authentic, or simply a complicated balance between opposing forces. 

 

Tags: planning, architecture, urban, place,

Yolanta Krawiecki's curator insight, August 7, 2015 5:30 PM

This is a compelling podcast linking architecture, heritage, political ideology and the built environment.  How we preserve and create place is put on trial as to when something is benign, fabricated, authentic, or simply a complicated balance between opposing forces. 

 

Tags: planning, architecture, urban, place,

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Urbanization in China

China's citizens are moving from the countryside into cities in record numbers, boosting the economy but making party leaders uneasy

 

Tags: economic, planning, urban, China, East Asia.


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François Arnal's curator insight, July 17, 2015 4:15 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

A big portion of China's economic boom the last few decades has been linked to the transformation of what used to be a predominantly agrarian civilization to an economic engine fueled by rapid urbanization.  This 2011 video from the Economist is still highly relevant today.   

 

@Céline

Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, July 18, 2015 9:02 AM

Une courte vidéo de la revue The Economist

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 2015 3:54 PM

A big portion of China's economic boom the last few decades has been linked to the transformation of what used to be a predominantly agrarian civilization to an economic engine fueled by rapid urbanization.  This 2011 video from the Economist is still highly relevant today.   

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Why Do We Love Paris but Hate Frankfurt? Six Qualities of Beautiful Cities

Why Do We Love Paris but Hate Frankfurt? Six Qualities of Beautiful Cities | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"In 'How to Make an Attractive City,' a new video from the School of Life, London-based Swiss writer Alain de Botton offers a cheeky, thought-provoking, six-point manifesto on the need for making beauty a priority in urban architecture and design."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 23, 2015 11:17 AM

Not everyone is a fan of Paris, but the author of this article feels that tourism can be seen as helpful proxy variable for what the general public perceives as good urbanism that makes for beautiful cities.  The six main points of this article are:

  • Order and Variety
  • Visible Life
  • Compact
  • Orientation and Mystery
  • Scale
  • Local


Tags: urban, planning, urbanism, culture, tourism.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 15, 2015 10:07 PM

History is a major attraction to tourists in any city, and Paris seems to have all these requirements to be a good urban city. The variety in architecture that is blended in within past and present structures gives a distinct look and attraction. Planning, of course, would help satisfy public expectations and the variety of culture and color would add to the delightful qualities of the city. Amenities contribute to the diversity of the city and businesses affect the image of culture in the city. 

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The Speed Burden [Costs of Sprawl]

The Speed Burden [Costs of Sprawl] | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The need for speed devours huge chunks of American cities and leaves the edges of the expressways worthless. Busy streets, for almost all of human history, created the greatest real estate value because they delivered customers and clients to the businesses operating there. This in turn cultivated the highest tax revenues in town, both from higher property taxes and from elevated sales taxes. But you can't set up shop on the side of an expressway. How can cities afford to spend so much to create thoroughfares with no adjoining property value?

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Alex Lewis's curator insight, March 10, 2015 10:23 AM

This article shows the difference between extremely urbanized areas and relatively urbanized areas. Florence and Atlanta are compared. Florence has narrow streets with sharp intersections, which causes cars to drive slowly. This is safer for pedestrians. In Atlanta, the roads are wider and curves are less sharp. The most this will do is help people in Atlanta get tp their jobs slightly faster. Miami and a seaside town are also compared. The interstate in Miami takes up most of the room and there is few real estate options. In the seaside town, options are not limited, around 80% available for use. The less urbanized places are more efficient. 

 

-A.L.

Alexa Earl's curator insight, March 14, 2015 10:48 AM

This blog really made me realize what an impact humans are to the environment. They compare different cities and talk about the impacts and it really showed me how humans have built up cities.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 21, 2015 6:12 PM

A side by side comparison at first blush is striking but the devil is in the details. Florence, Italy is a city of only 368,000 while the Atlanta metro area is about 4.5 million. Agree that sprawl is ineffective real estate and efficiency wise, but fuel prices may be having a counter effect on the reduction of sprawl. It is much less expensive to commute given the price of oil at its current levels and the millennials will have a say in this urban sprawl contracting or expanding. Many do not own cars, relying on commuter systems within the city to get around. This in theory should drive down demand for fossil fuels, culminating in reduced prices for gasoline. If the infrastructure is already built, was is the cost to maintain it, given the static population of the large metro areas? Interesting to see how this plays out.

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University Re-Imagines Town And Gown Relationship In Philadelphia

University Re-Imagines Town And Gown Relationship In Philadelphia | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Drexel University is taking a hands-on approach to redeveloping one of Philadelphia's poorest neighborhoods with a new center designed to serve not just students but mainly local residents.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 30, 2015 12:49 PM

This NPR podcast shows a good example of an urban revitalization project that is actively trying to avoid following the gentrification path.  Growing colleges can unintentionally displace longtime residents, but this project is about preserving the cultural fabric of the neighborhood and building good will in the community. 


Tags: neighborhoodpodcast, gentrificationurban, place, culture, economicracepoverty.

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, April 8, 2015 12:29 PM

APHG- HW Option 3

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Visualizing Urban Change

Visualizing Urban Change | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"60 years has made a big difference in the urban form of American cities. The most rapid change occurred during the mid-century urban renewal period that cleared large tracts of urban land for new highways, parking, and public facilities or housing projects. Fine-grained networks of streets and buildings on small lots were replaced with superblocks and megastructures. While the period did make way for impressive new projects in many cities, many of the scars are still unhealed.  We put together these sliders to show how cities have changed over half a century. In this post, we look at Midwestern cities such as [pictured above] Cincinnati, Ohio."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:33 AM

It's ironic that I feel more accustomed to exploring Cincinnati, OH on foot than I do Providence, RI.  Although I drive in downtown Providence regularly, I seldom have a reason to walk and explore it.  In my yearly visits to Cincinnati to score the AP Human Geography exams, I'm outside my hometown and away from my typical routine. That helps me feel more like a flâneur, to stroll the streets and explore the urban landscape.  This set of 7 before and after images shows Midwestern cities (Cincinnati, Detroit, St. Louis, Minneapolis, Milwaukee, Indianapolis, Cleveland, and Columbus) lets you digitally analyze the last 70 years of urban morphology.  Click here for a gallery 7 of cities in Texas and Oklahoma


Questions to Ponder: What are the biggest changes you see for the 1950 to today?  How are the land uses difference?  Has the density changed?  Do any of urban models help us understand these cities?


Tags: urban, planning, industry, economichistorical, geospatial, urban models, APHG.

Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 2, 2015 5:52 PM

Very useful!

Sierra_Mcswagger's curator insight, March 10, 2015 10:22 AM

In the above picture of Cincinnati, Ohio it is clear how much change American cities have undergone in 60 years. In the process of urban renewal these cities have been affected tremendously with the addition of new roads, businesses, and most likely the turning of land over to private developers. All previous land has been renovated and changed into the typical urbanized American city. S.S.

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The surprising math of cities and corporations

"Physicist Geoffrey West has found that simple, mathematical laws govern the properties of cities — that wealth, crime rate, walking speed and many other aspects of a city can be deduced from a single number: the city's population. In this mind-bending talk from TEDGlobal he shows how it works and how similar laws hold for organisms and corporations."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 4, 2014 2:44 PM

While corporations rise and fall, it is quite rare for a city to entirely fail as an economic system.  Huge cities have some negative consequences, but the networks that operate in the city function more efficiently on economies of scale in a way that offsets the negatives.  Increasing a city's population will continue to improve the economies of scale (larger cities have higher wages per capita, more creative employment per capita, etc.).  However, this growth requires major technological innovations to sustain long-term growth.  

 

Tagsurban, planningmegacities, industry, economic, scaleTED, video.

Built 4 Betterness Ed van den Berg's curator insight, December 14, 2014 3:17 PM

Not surprisingly the DNA of cities is a follow-up of human DNA and understanding this will explain and predict how the body of a city will develop!

SRA's curator insight, April 16, 2015 2:10 AM

The idea that cities are just organisms that are satisfying the laws of biology is interesting. Especially because Physicist Geoffrey West brings the idea of Scalability which by definition is, the ability of a system, network, or process to handle a growing amount of work in a capable manner or its ability to be enlarged to accommodate that growth. What’s mind blowing to me is that the system that is referred to here is human interaction.  We create these cities through our interaction and experience. With a growth rate of 1,000,000 people every year the math adds up to an agreeable 15% rise in income levels, patents, and super creative people every year which is undoubted a win for civilization and society. But with that we must keep in mind also this means a 15% increase in things like deadly disease, crime, poverty, and ecological issues leading to further degradation of our planet. This unbounded growth means the system is destined to collapse. The math behind cities doesn't lie if we don’t prepare cities have a fate to die like every other organism in Biology. So it is up to us to create and innovate to sustain this growth and avoid the collapse. But we must do so at a forever increasing pace. Which subsequently is also part of another system predetermined to collapse. What I mean is what happens when we cannot innovate fast enough to sustain this growth?


- Caleb Beckett

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Using Google Earth to Track Down Criminals

Authorities use Google Earth to crack down on illegal activities.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 23, 2014 8:48 PM

This is an old clip, but a useful platform to discuss the ethics involved in using geospatial technologies, the expectations of privacy and issues of governance.  This could also be used to discuss urban political geography and principles of planning.  What are the limits to the legal and ethical uses of technologies?


Tags: google, mapping, geospatial.

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, September 28, 2014 8:19 PM

I think this is a good tool to the authorities to keep a eye on criminal people. Some people may feel that some one is always watching you because of these, but lets see the good side, this could help the police to find criminals or illegals activities. In my opinion these is a good idea.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 27, 2014 11:51 AM

Using geographic technology to catch criminals seems like a great use of technology in the digital age. But this is a massive breach of privacy on a global scale. Now with satellite imagery, there is fewer and fewer geographic factors that allow for privacy. No longer can someone move into the woods for solitude, in the past geography could be used as a way to isolate oneself from others, now with technology like "google earth", the globe has become easier to monitor all landscapes and areas. People will have to ask themselves how much they are willing to sacrifice in terms of security. If being monitored everywhere you go means less dangerous activities taking place it may be worth the risk, but we are putting a lot of faith in the fact that those in charge of these technologies will use them responsibly. 

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Squatters on the Skyline

"Facing a mounting housing shortage, squatters have transformed an abandoned skyscraper in downtown Caracas into a makeshift home for more than 2,500 people."


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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, March 5, 2015 2:13 PM

The squatters have made their own community complete with services and mini marts.  This tells me there is not enough affordable housing if the people of Caracas are willing to live in dangerous conditions.  Caracas government needs to build affordable housing or create better paying jobs so the citizens can spend the money in the community.  Its a cycle that needs everyone's participation to work to build a sustaining economy.  

Gene Gagne's curator insight, October 15, 2015 1:42 PM

I found this article interesting

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 22, 2015 10:57 AM

we have talked about this in class. These people have learned to adapt and find ways to use electricity, running water. We have seen videos of other cities in countries with electrical cables and sewage water out in the open and people find ways to tap into it. The building reminds me of the abandon mills in R.I. where homeless people frequent to beat the harsh elements and sleep at night. They build small fires and use different areas for bathroom visits. The difference is our brick unoccupied mills find a way to catch fire and the city levels them to the ground. This is definitely unsafe but goes to show when you have no place to live its amazing how people find ways to survive and kind of build their own community. What I found disturbing is the people outside the neighborhood angry because the squatters took over the building. All of a sudden they complained about the safety of the squatters when in all reality they are safer because they are acting as a self community and know they need each other to survive. If the government or city officials or citizens of the neighborhood are that concerned then they can find a way to fix up the building.

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Developing World Cities and Population Density

Developing World Cities and Population Density | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Without a question, we are living in an urban era. More people now live in cities than anywhere else on the planet and I’ve repeatedly argued that cities are our most important economic engine. As a result of these shifts, we’re seeing megacities at a scale the world has never seen before.

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Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 27, 2014 12:05 PM
المدن الأعلى كثافة بالسكان على مستوى العالم
Sally Egan's curator insight, June 29, 2014 9:31 PM

Mega cities and the challenges they face for the future is focus in this article. Great statistics on populations and urban densities are also included.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:47 PM

APHG-U6

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Sense of Place


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 4, 2015 9:55 PM

Kunstler argues that American architecture and urban planning are not creating public places that encourage interaction and communal engagement.  We should create more distinct places that foster a sense of place that is 'worth fighting for,' as opposed to suburbia which he sees as emblematic of these problems. 


Question to Ponder: How should we design cities to create a strong sense of place?  What elements are necessary? 


Tagsurban, planning, place, architecture, suburbs, video.

L.Long's curator insight, November 20, 2015 7:04 PM

Culture of Place

Sally Egan's curator insight, November 22, 2015 5:28 PM

Provides great example of the concepts of Place and Lieveability.

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How Chicago became the country's alley capital

How Chicago became the country's alley capital | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
How Chicago became the alley capital of the country and why so much of the rest of the region is conspicuously alley-free.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 23, 2015 3:40 PM

The alley is a reminder of past visions of how to best lay out a city.  In the 19th century, back when Chicago started booming, the city was laid out in a grid and it quickly became a filthy, stinky, disease-ridden place. "Rear service lanes were essential for collecting trash, delivering coal, and stowing human waste — basically, keeping anything unpleasant away from living quarters."  As we have moved towards curvilinear residential streets and more discrete public utilities, the newer neighborhoods abandoned the alley, but they are still very prominent in old neighborhoods (click here for an interactive map to explore all of Chicago's alleys). 

Also, Chicago's suburbs have lofty names (Mount, Heights, Ridge, etc.)  that don't match this flat topography--read here to find out why.  


Tags: Chicago, urban, placetoponyms, planning, urbanism.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 9:49 AM

unit 7 #chitownlove

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Even When You Go Off the Grid, You Might Still Be On It

Even When You Go Off the Grid, You Might Still Be On It | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The images here, taken from the Instagram account @the.jefferson.grid show just a few of the landscapes that can be squeezed into the one-mile squares. The idea behind this sprawling checkerboard emerged after the Revolutionary War. As the United States expanded westward, the country needed a systematic way to divide its newly acquired lands. The original colonies were surveyed using the British system of 'metes and bounds,' with parcels delineated using local geography.  

 

That approach doesn’t scale very well, and Jefferson proposed to slice the young United States into gridded plots of land.  Jefferson's idea became a reality in 1785 when it was enacted as the Public Land Survey System. Today his grid covers much of the country, and it is still used to survey federal lands — an idea that shaped the physical landscape of half a continent."

 

Tags: images, land use, landscape, social media, planning, spatial, scale, historical.


Via Seth Dixon, Jane Ellingson
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Dyna-e International's curator insight, September 1, 2015 12:32 PM

No such thing as being off the grid really. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 8, 2015 1:05 PM

unit 1 and 4

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Why are we so reliant on air conditioning? (It's not just climate change, it's bad design)

Why are we so reliant on air conditioning? (It's not just climate change, it's bad design) | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Air conditioners have made architects lazy, and we've forgotten how to design houses that might work without it.

 

A hundred years ago, a house in Florida looked different than a house in New England. The northern house might be boxy, have relatively small windows, almost always two stories with low ceilings, and a big fireplace in the middle. 

In Florida, the house might have high ceilings, tall double-hung windows, and deep porches. Trees would be planted around the house to block the sun. 

Today, houses pretty much look the same wherever you go in North America, and one thing made this possible: central air conditioning. Now, the United States uses more energy for air conditioning than 1 billion people in Africa use for everything.

 

Tags: planning, architecture, housing, urban, place, environment adapt, energy, consumption.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 21, 2015 12:44 PM

The recent demographic shift to the "Sun Belt" in the U.S.  coincides with the mass availability of air conditioning (among other factors).  Our homes are less regionally distinct and in terms of the human/environmental interactions, our answer is greater modifications as opposed to regional adaptations...this article is a call for more architectural improvements instead of more energy consumption to beat the heat.  In Europe however, they see the United States as "over air-conditioned" in the summer.

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, July 23, 2015 1:12 PM

A GOOD STORY ABOUT AIR CONDITIONING

Corine Ramos's curator insight, December 8, 2015 8:18 PM

The recent demographic shift to the "Sun Belt" in the U.S.  coincides with the mass availability of air conditioning (among other factors).  Our homes are less regionally distinct and in terms of the human/environmental interactions, our answer is greater modifications as opposed to regional adaptations...this article is a call for more architectural improvements instead of more energy consumption to beat the heat.  In Europe however, they see the United States as "over air-conditioned" in the summer.

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How to Make an Attractive City

We've grown good at making many things in the modern world - but strangely the art of making attractive cities has been lost. Here are some key principles for how to make attractive cities once again.

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Seth Forman's curator insight, May 26, 2015 6:57 PM

Summary: This interesting video talks about principles that should be considered by city planners that could make our life's better and happier.

 

Insight: This video is relevant  to unit 7 because it shows efforts that should be taken by urban planners and how a simple city layout can effect our lives. 

Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 27, 2015 1:01 AM

This video gives you an overview of how to make the most attractive city in six ways. It explains the reasons and the wants of a city that potential residents are looking for.

 

This video relates to Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use because it talks about the orgin, site and situation a city should have for it to be considered attractive to people. A city should be chaotic/ordered, should have visible life, compact, is should have a nice/mysterious orientation, it should not be too big or too small, and it should be local and lively. Today, many cities lack attractiveness because of the intellectual confusion around beauty and the lack of political will. I totally agree with video and the requirement s to have an attrative city. 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 4:17 AM

We definitely need more visually pleasing cities, our world is lacking and we are loosing it to like in the video "corporate opportunists".

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Egypt's New Capital?

Egypt's New Capital? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

The teeming, maddening, and indescribably charming city of Cairo has served as Egypt's capital for 1,000 years. When it emerged it was perhaps the most important cultural center in the Arab world.

But the city's days as Egypt's capital could be numbered. On Friday, the Egyptian government announced that the country will build a new capital from scratch, carving out a piece of the desert between Cairo and the Suez Canal. The project, which is being dubbed "the Capital Cairo," is slated to cost an estimated $45 billion and host Egypt's sprawling government bureaucracy, universities, tourism facilities, hospitals, and a new international airport.


Via Seth Dixon, LEONARDO WILD
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Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 26, 2015 12:01 AM

I think it is really interesting that Egypt is thinking about building a completely brand new city. It just shows how much risk the country is willing to take on this very lucrative project that will cost more than sixth of the country's GDP. If the country succeeds, then it will face an amazing influx of capital and resources that is unprecedented. If the country fails, then it will be one of the worst financial investments to plague the country and will haunt the country for decades to come. Distrust in government fiscal responsibility will decline tremendously. This article demonstrates the forces that are compelling the Egyptian government to drive urbanization in undeveloped areas. Desperate times call for desperate measures.

Evan Margiotta's curator insight, May 26, 2015 7:25 PM

This announcement of a new capital city, announced in March of 2015, acts as a part of a inclusive plan aimed at revitalizing the economy and influence of Egypt. In a goal to escape the congestion, pollution, and  sprawl of Cairo, the Egypt government has it aims at 45 billion dollar project. If/when completed the new city will aim at sustainable development and include 2,000 new schools, a new massive international airport, and be about the size of Singapore. 

This situation applies to many principles in human geography. The problems created by overpopulation are evident in Cairo, and it is necessary for this new capital to follow a system of sustainable development to avoid the same problems.

Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:53 PM

This shows the development of the world and how now "poorer" countries are beginning to plan out big cities of their own.

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With Porches And Parks, A Texas Community Aims For Urban Utopia

With Porches And Parks, A Texas Community Aims For Urban Utopia | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Austin's Mueller neighborhood is a new-urbanist dream, designed to be convivial, walkable and energy-efficient. Every house has a porch or stoop, and all the cars are hidden away.

 

After moving here, respondents said, they spend an average of 90 fewer minutes a week in the car, and most reported higher levels of physical activity.  The poll results seem to validate new-urbanist gospel: good design, like sidewalks, street lighting, extensive trails and parkland, can improve social and physical health.  Part II: A Texas Community Takes on Racial Tensions Once Hidden Under The Surface.

 

Tags: housing, urban, planning, urbanism, unit 7 cities, neighborhood, podcast.


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zane alan berger's curator insight, March 24, 2015 4:37 PM

This article focuses on an Austin community with a Utopian atmosphere. Beginning the construction in 2007, Mueller neighborhoods are very uniform; two story, two car garage in the back, and a porch in the front. This article refers to Urbanization

Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, May 26, 2015 7:54 PM

Unit 7 Urban

      The article describes the master planned community of Mueller. Mueller is filled with parks and green spaces. In addition, every house has a porch and a garage in the back of the house to encourage communication between people and neighbors. Also everything is located close together so it is very easy to walk to the store instead of driving. Many houses employ solar panels for their energy and use fuel efficient hybrid cars.

       Located centrally near downtown Austin this community was based on the concepts of new urbanism and uses effective and efficient methods to create a healthy and fresh neighborhood for both the people and the environment.  New Urbanism is a concept which counters urban sprawl with urban revitalizations, sustainable development, and suburban reforms. The communities following the principles of New Urbanism are often designed compactly to promote a sense of community and place. 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 6:24 AM

The Mueller community was developed from an old airport. I had the chance to visit this community on an APHUG field trip because it was so close. We were able to see the reasons why the community was developed and learned about innovated communities.

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11 Signs Your Hood Is Being Gentrified

11 Signs Your Hood Is Being Gentrified | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A Washington, D.C., resident describes the changes and privilege that have moved into her longtime neighborhood.

 

Tags: neighborhood, gentrification, urban, place, culture, economic, Washington DC.


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Emily Bian's curator insight, March 22, 2015 8:48 PM

7) Uneven development, zones of abandonment, disamenity, and gentrification

This article was written by a woman who noticed a lot of changes in Washington D.C. Gentrification led to these many changes, by becoming not as unique and urbanizing at other people's expense. She describes gentrification as remodeling very quickly and ferociously. A lot of the things she says are for the general good of the people, like installing street lights, but don't take into consideration the people who don't appreciate the changes. Stores like walmart are taking over the family owned stores, and more people are moving in. 

This article describes gentrification perfectly, and I like her pictures to go along with it. I think this would help introduce this vocab term to new students. 

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 24, 2015 12:29 AM

Sadly, gentrification happens all across the world. Poor populations in cities are disadvantaged and often have to move out due to wealthier populations moving in. One of the signs I found most disturbing was that police will start patrolling the areas where wealthier and poorer populations mix. This is a sad reality. Police do this to ensure that crime rates are low as poor people would be more tempted to commit crimes in wealthier neighborhoods. I do think this police patrolling has racist roots since the poorer population in Washington D.C. is mostly black. Words like "renewal" and "redevelopment" hide the sad reality behind gentrification/

Ricardo Cabeza de Vaca's curator insight, May 25, 2015 9:36 PM

I believe this article is very interesting because it shows how gentrification can change a neighborhood. I believe gentrification is a little bit of a negative thing because it adds geographical uniformity to our modern society and yes that could be good thing in measure. The article states now police patrol every street, Walmart's and 7-11's start showing up, areas will start becoming more aesthetically pleasing, but is that really a good thing? I believe that sometimes while you are driving by it is better to have a change in your surrounding, rather than seeing the same thing over and over again even if it is more modern.

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The United Bike Lanes of America

The United Bike Lanes of America | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
What do America's bike paths look like from coast coast and how do bike lanes in cities stack up?

 

Tags: transportation, planning.


Via Seth Dixon
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Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 13, 2014 1:50 PM

With the rise in gas emissions, everyone is trying to make a stride towards reducing this effect and cleaning up our society. One way in particular is using a bike to get to work. Although it may not seem like something we are used to, it is definitely something we should start getting used to. Looking at this map of the bike lanes in america we see a large amount of the west coast and east coast dedicated towards pushing the issue so that bikes become more prevalent. In theory using bikes will not only reduce emission but it makes for a healthier human body by exerting physical activity instead of sitting back and cruising your way to work. To my knowledge if we try for pushing the issue with more bikes then we are also helping our environment 

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This brilliant illustration shows how much public space we've surrendered to cars

How lopsided the the proportions of an urban street corner really are.

 

Most roads in the US are built for cars, not for pedestrians. Whether we're happy or unhappy with this, most of us are aware of it.

But this brilliant illustration, made by Swedish artist Karl Jilg and commissioned by the Swedish Road Administration, shows just how extreme the situation truly is — even in an urban business district that's designed with pedestrians in mind. 

 

Tags: urban, transportation, planning, art.


Via Seth Dixon
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America is rapidly aging in a country built for the young

America is rapidly aging in a country built for the young | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Although we seldom think about them this way, most American communities as they exist today were built for the spry and mobile. We've constructed millions of multi-story, single-family homes where the master bedroom is on the second floor, where the lawn outside requires weekly upkeep, where the mailbox is a stroll away. We've designed neighborhoods where everyday errands require a driver's license. We've planned whole cities where, if you don't have a car, it's not particularly easy to walk anywhere — especially not if you move gingerly.

This reality has been a fine one for a younger country. Those multi-story, single-family homes with broad lawns were great for Baby Boomers when they had young families. And car-dependent suburbs have been fine for residents with the means and mobility to drive everywhere. But as the Baby Boomers whose preferences drove a lot of these trends continue to age, it's becoming increasingly clear that the housing and communities we've built won't work very well for the old."


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Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, October 18, 2014 6:48 PM

This is also an issue in Australia where the overwhelming majority of people live in single story dwellings and are very car reliant.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, January 28, 2015 8:59 PM

I can definitely see this as a real problem. Both my Uncle and my Great Uncle moved their condos from ones that had numerous steps to climb to the second floor to more elder-friendly options. My Great Uncle even went a step further to move him and his wife to a senior living community, where there food, entertainment, etc. is all provided within an enclosed neighbourhood with other people of their age group. More of these communities that act like oversized retirement homes could be the answer. They give the illusion of suburban living, something the baby boomers liked, while providing the accessibility they need.

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, April 8, 2015 12:27 PM

APHG- HW Option 1

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An Intriguingly Detailed Animation of How People Move Around a City

An Intriguingly Detailed Animation of How People Move Around a City | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Watch the commuting patterns of New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles.

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Tom Cockburn's curator insight, July 13, 2014 5:49 AM

possibly useful for studying complexity

Bronwyn Burke's curator insight, July 13, 2014 6:28 PM
Another fabulous post for Year 7 via Seth Dixon. An aspect of liveability in colour!
MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:03 PM

APHG-U7