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An earthquake felt across South Asia

An earthquake felt across South Asia | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The magnitude-7.8 earthquake that struck Nepal on Saturday morning destroyed parts of Kathmandu, trapped many people under rubble and killed more than 2,500 people. It was the worst to hit the country since a massive 1934 temblor killed more than 8,000."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 27, 9:14 AM

Even though we know that with the plate tectonic boundaries where these disasters are more likely to occur, it never fully is expected.  These before and after pictures are heart-rending and full the extent of the damage is hard to comprehend (explore in ArcGIS online or view the USGS data).  IRIS provides powerpoint slides for teachers to use this earthquake as a 'teachable moment.'

Geographer Jon Kedrowski has a blog about his mountaineering and expeditions. He is up on Everest now, and his blog has a description of the earthquake and the resulting avalanche. The pictures and descriptions are both sobering and fascinating.  If you want to help, you can donate money or your geospatial abilities (open-source mapping).

*This post was prepared in collaboration with Dr. Deborah Hann of the Texas Alliance for Geographic Education.


Tags: Nepal, disasters, physical, tectonics.

Sally Egan's curator insight, April 27, 8:48 PM

Fabulous images and great for study of this disaster.

Aysha Maria's curator insight, Today, 1:26 AM

Sad & ill-fated..!

 

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Journey to the Center of the Earth

Journey to the Center of the Earth | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"How far would you have to travel to reach the Earth’s core? And what would you see along the way? Use this BBC interactive to dig into the truth. (BBC).  Download the National Geographic Education high-resolution illustration of Earth’s interior."


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Tide Makes Tombolo an Island

Tide Makes Tombolo an Island | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The historic abbey of Mont Saint-Michel became an island on March 21 after a rare “supertide” flooded a causeway.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 25, 11:23 AM

Coastal physical geography produces some beautiful landforms such as tombolos.  A tombolo is created when sand deposits attach an island to a larger piece of land--think of it as special type of isthmus.  Mont St. Michel (picture above) is the world’s most famous example because of the iconic walled city with crowned with a striking medieval abbey.  As the tides fluctuated, the city and abbey were alternately connected or disconnected from the mainland.  However, a ‘super-tide’ that occurs once every 18.6 years wiped out the artificial causeway stranding motorists on France's most visited tourist destination (I wouldn't mind be stranded there right about now).  


Tags: water, physical, coastal, geomorphology, landformsFrance, tourism.

West Sound Tech Assn's curator insight, March 25, 8:32 PM

Not techy but very cool!

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Augmented Reality Sandbox

"Realtime topographic contour line generation."


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Bobbi Dunham's curator insight, March 8, 10:08 AM

Well, that is just incredible. Now THAT'S a sandbox! Augmented Reality is going to be a major gamechanger.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, April 5, 9:20 PM

Every Geography classroom needs one of these to explain topography

Paul Farias's curator insight, April 9, 12:24 PM

This thing is sick! I would love to make one of these i would play with this thing for hours and I'm an adult. And they say video games are useless, the kinect can be used for things other than dance offs and such. 

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How Wolves Change Rivers

"When wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the United States after being absent nearly 70 years, the most remarkable 'trophic cascade' occurred. What is a trophic cascade and how exactly do wolves change rivers?"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 6, 11:53 AM

When a complex system gets one aspect of it changed, there are many other changes that occur, some of which are nearly impossible to envision beforehand.  Here is some Oregon State research on the changes in Yellowstone's ecosystems and physical environments since the introduction of wolves. 


Tagsecology, biogeography, environment, environment adapt, physical, fluvial.

Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, February 7, 11:56 PM

AMAZING!

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Simulation of the Oso Landslide

Simulation of the Oso Landslide | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The large landslide that occurred in March near Oso, Washington was unusually mobile and destructive."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 13, 1:53 PM

There are several reasons for landslides--some are purely a result of physical geography and others are related to land use patterns.  The landslide in Washington state last year was a combination of the two (see on map) and it is a good teaching moment to discuss the environmental impacts of land use patterns and resource extraction projects.  As seen in this interactive, the river was cutting at the base of the hill, while loggers were clear-cutting at the top of the mountain.  Trees help prevent erosion as the roots hold the soil in place--a critical piece to the puzzle in a very rainy climate.  With $1 million worth of timber on the slope, logging companies persisted despite objections from the Department of Natural Resources and some restrictions (but in hindsight, those restrictions clearly were not enough).  Watch a simulation of the landslide here.  

View the impact in ArcGIS online: Before and After Swipe, LiDAR I and II, and Imagery.


Questions to Consider: Other than economic worth, what other ways are there to value and evaluate the environment?  How could this landscape have been protected and managed better or was this landslide inevitable?   


Tagspolitical ecology, resources, environment, environment modify, industry, physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 27, 4:50 PM

This seems like a useful tool to a degree.  But if we could actually simulate every destructive event then we would be miracle workers.  This was a sad event.  We have left such an imprint on the earth that it's starting to fight back.  We need to be more aware and careful with the one planet we have.  Climate changes are in the news more and more.  We can't ignore climate changes anymore.  

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Gravitational Pull

Gravitational Pull | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Revolution and rotation are the terms we use to describe the motions of the earth and moon. Revolution is the movement of the earth in an orbit around the sun.  The Earth completes one revolution around the sun every 365 days. The moon revolves around the Earth about once every month." 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 14, 2014 2:24 PM

Understanding the relationships between the Sun, Earth and moon are critical for for understanding the seasons, climate and other geographic factors.  This interactive simulates gravity unlike anything I've every seen on a computer screen. 


To exploring Earth-Sun interactions, playing around with the University of Nebraska-Lincoln's Sun Simulator is a fun way to make a little more sense of the various factors that control how the Sun appears in the sky.

Barbara Goebel's curator insight, December 23, 2014 10:41 AM

Writing prompt: Specify a set of objects to put in motion, have them observe the interactions of the objects, then write to describe. For younger students, supply an observation organizer note sheet. For older students, the descriptions can be as technical as their math understanding will allow. 

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 28, 9:06 PM

It's pretty simple, the bigger the particle is, the bigger it's atmosphere is to allow more gravity. For example, Jupiter is the largest planet which is in favor to Earth. The reason why is because Jupiter uses it's large mass to protect Earth from oncoming meteors and comets. It uses it's large atmosphere to absorb comets and meteors onto Jupiter instead of allowing them to crash onto Earth. 

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Meandering Stream Time Lapse

The most viral images on the internet, curated in real time by a dedicated community through commenting, voting and sharing.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 13, 2014 2:06 PM

This is a fantastic way to visualize physical geographic processes. 


Tags physical, fluvial, geomorphology, erosion, landscape.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 25, 2014 1:24 PM

El Sire Reserve in Peru is a river that has been monitored over the last 28 years. Every time I watch this short 6 second clip, I learn something different about how this river has changed. On the bottom of the screen, just past half way, the river just takes a huge short cut and cuts over and connects to a different part of the same river. This happens on the whole river too. there are 8 or 9 huge bends and curves in the river but by the end in 2012 there are only about 3 to 4 bends and curves. For some reason the water is taking short cuts and just leaving the spaces where the water used to run through and leaving it dry.  

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Eerie Landforms

Eerie Landforms | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Utah's Fantasy Canyon features mudstone eroded into bizarre shapes. This one's called "Flying Witch". #Halloween

 

Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms, Utah.


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Worst Hurricane

Worst Hurricane | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"What's the worst Hurricane anyone in your town remembers?""


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Nancy Watson's curator insight, August 24, 2014 7:59 PM

Andrew  was bad, Katrina was most memorable

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, September 21, 2014 1:24 AM

The worst Hurricane that I remember is Hurricane "Katrina" in 2005. I was living in Puerto Rico but I remember seen the devastating news. The largest number of deaths occurred in New Orleans, which was flooded because its levee system failed. Also "Katrina" was the hurricane that has caused more economic damage as well as one of the five deadliest hurricanes, in the history of the United States. It was a very sad event. I hope that does not happen again.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, October 29, 2014 1:51 PM

My father is actually good friends with a guy who he went to school with that specifically help clean up after natural disasters such as hurricanes. I got to talk to him for a little bit about hurricane Katrina, since that was his most recent natural disaster that he helped with at the time. He said it was probably one of the, if not the worst of the natural disaster to help clean and rebuild. He spent the most time with that natural disaster than any others he said. From de-flooding homes, to destroying homes, to rebuilding homes was one of the most strenuous things he has ever had to do in his career.

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Yes, Yellowstone's Roads Just Melted. No, There's No Reason to Panic

Yes, Yellowstone's Roads Just Melted. No, There's No Reason to Panic | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Last week, a major tourist thruway in Yellowstone National Park had to be shut down because the road melted. The road’s Wicked Witch of the West impression was caused by high temperatures in both the air and under the ground. Yellowstone sits atop a volcanic hotspot, and that heat helped cause the asphalt to soften and oil to well up onto the surface."

 


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Colorado River Reaches the Sea of Cortez

Colorado River Reaches the Sea of Cortez | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"When the Minute 319 'pulse flow' began in March 2014, it was not clear whether the effort would be enough to reconnect the Colorado River with the Sea of Cortez. Some hydrologists thought there might be just enough water; others were less optimistic. It turns out the optimists were right, though just barely. For the first time in sixteen years, the Colorado River was reunited with the Sea of Cortez on May 15, 2014."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 28, 2014 5:57 PM

California has had three consecutive years of below average rainfall and most reservoirs are far below their designed capacity; amid a drought this severe and wildfires, it is startling to hear of a project to restore some of the Colorado River Basin's natural patterns and ecology.  


Tags: physicalremote sensing, California, water, environmenturban ecology.

Kate Buckland's curator insight, June 7, 2014 7:43 PM

Parallels with the Murray River...

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California's Drought

California's Drought | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"California has had three consecutive years of below average rainfall and most reservoirs are far below their designed capacity; for a state with a growing population with limited water resources this is alarming news that has many politicians, officials and residents worried. This winter was especially mild; nice for bragging to friend back East about how gorgeous the weather is during a polar vortex spell, but horrible for the snow pack and accumulation."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 10, 2014 2:45 PM

Most of California’s water originates for the snow pack in Western mountains ranges so this drought is expected to get worse this summer. The major urban areas have limited local water resources so they draw water from large area to bring in sufficient water for these burgeoning metropolitan regions.


Questions to Consider: What are some reasons (both from human and physical geography) for this severe drought? What can be done in the short-term to lessen the problem? What can be done to make California’s water situation better for the next 50 years?


Tags: physical, weather and climate, consumptionCaliforniaLos Angeles, water, environment, resources, environment dependurban ecology.

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Nepal earthquake: Hundreds die, many feared trapped

Nepal earthquake: Hundreds die, many feared trapped | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
At least 970 people have died as Nepal suffered its worst earthquake for more than 80 years, with deaths also reported in India, Tibet and Bangladesh.

 

Tags: Nepal, disasters, physical, tectonics.


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California Drought Tests History of Endless Growth

California Drought Tests History of Endless Growth | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A punishing drought is forcing a reconsideration of whether the aspiration of untrammeled growth that has for so long been the state’s engine has run against the limits of nature.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 6, 8:30 PM

Major urban areas in California have limited local water resources so they draw water from large area to bring in sufficient water for these burgeoning metropolitan regions.  With this current drought getting worse, California has ordered emergency water restrictions on residents while companies and large farms have been granted exemptions even though they account for 82% of the state's annual water consumption (residential accounts for 12%). Almond farms alone consume 10% of the state's water, and many agricultural crops are incredibly water intensive land uses.  A better way to think of it isn't just about raw water usage though.  A better question to ask would be this--how does one gallon of water translate into calories that most efficiently feed people?


Questions to Ponder: How does the concept of carrying capacity relate to California urban growth/drought issues?  California passed its carrying capacity?  How are demographics, economics, politics and the environment intertwined in California?  What are the environmental limits on urban growth and development? 


Tags: physical, weather and climate, consumptionCalifornia, water, environment, resources, environment dependurban ecology.

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, April 9, 8:49 AM

The mathematics of endless growth due to economic monetary rules has a clear outcome.

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Volcanic Eruption

"WebCams de Mexico archives the best of webcam videos in Mexico."


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Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, March 17, 3:53 PM

Impressionnant

Mr Inniss's curator insight, March 20, 9:28 AM

watch an eruption in action

Paul Farias's curator insight, April 9, 12:43 PM

It almost reminds me of a blemish that needs to be tended to on the face of the earth and it just couldn't handle the pressure anymore. My fascination with the way the earth does things blows my mind. 

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How the warming Arctic might be behind Boston's deep freeze

How the warming Arctic might be behind Boston's deep freeze | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
There may be a counterintuitive explanation for the deep freeze that hit New England this winter: The rapidly warming Arctic is causing big disruptions in the jet stream, which carries weather across North America. Is this the worst winter you've experienced?

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, Arctic, Boston, climate change, podcast.


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Gail McAuliffe's curator insight, March 1, 11:12 AM

Perhaps this article will sway some climate change skeptics...

Paul Farias's curator insight, April 9, 11:33 AM

So bizarre how the rate of the arctic warming causes us to get smacked with the cold weather. Its one of those things that are like how does the jet stream actually work. Including the fact that California is getting hit with a major drought. 

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Simulation of the Oso Landslide

Simulation of the Oso Landslide | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The large landslide that occurred in March near Oso, Washington was unusually mobile and destructive."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 13, 1:53 PM

There are several reasons for landslides--some are purely a result of physical geography and others are related to land use patterns.  The landslide in Washington state last year was a combination of the two (see on map) and it is a good teaching moment to discuss the environmental impacts of land use patterns and resource extraction projects.  As seen in this interactive, the river was cutting at the base of the hill, while loggers were clear-cutting at the top of the mountain.  Trees help prevent erosion as the roots hold the soil in place--a critical piece to the puzzle in a very rainy climate.  With $1 million worth of timber on the slope, logging companies persisted despite objections from the Department of Natural Resources and some restrictions (but in hindsight, those restrictions clearly were not enough).  Watch a simulation of the landslide here.  

View the impact in ArcGIS online: Before and After Swipe, LiDAR I and II, and Imagery.


Questions to Consider: Other than economic worth, what other ways are there to value and evaluate the environment?  How could this landscape have been protected and managed better or was this landslide inevitable?   


Tagspolitical ecology, resources, environment, environment modify, industry, physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 27, 4:50 PM

This seems like a useful tool to a degree.  But if we could actually simulate every destructive event then we would be miracle workers.  This was a sad event.  We have left such an imprint on the earth that it's starting to fight back.  We need to be more aware and careful with the one planet we have.  Climate changes are in the news more and more.  We can't ignore climate changes anymore.  

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Town Slowly deformed by Plate Tectonics

Town Slowly deformed by Plate Tectonics | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The signs that something’s wrong are not immediately obvious, but, once you see them, it’s hard to tune them out. Curbs at nearly the exact same spot on opposite sides of the street are popped out of alignment. Houses too young to show this kind of wear stand oddly warped, torqued out of sync with their own foundations, their once-strong frames off-kilter. This is Hollister, California, a town being broken in two slowly, relentlessly, and in real time by an effect known as 'fault creep.' A slow, surreal tide of deformation has appeared throughout the city."

 

Tags: disasters, geomorphology, California, physical.


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Why Do Rivers Curve?


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Sally Egan's curator insight, December 7, 2014 4:27 PM

A very siual form using simple language to explain the meandering of rivers. Applicable to the course work on Hydrosphere.

YEC Geo's curator insight, December 7, 2014 8:15 PM

Actually a very good video.  My one quibble is with the introduction, when the narrator talks about mountain streams "carving" their gorges.  The puzzle of how small streams could possibly carve out deep bedrock canyons is an ongoing research problem, and is difficult to resolve from a gradualistic perspective.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 27, 12:15 AM

So pretty much, the water controls rivers rather than particles controlling the river. Also, it appears that the motion and strength of the water causes rivers to bend and form in different curves. I'd like to think of it as a ball bouncing from side to side and every time it touches the border land of a river, it expands to the opposite side. However, when the water flow is hitting the side of a river, the opposite side is not getting any force from the water flow. In that case, the side that is not getting hit by the water flow slowly moves to the side that is being by the water flow causing river curves.

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What’s the deal with Antarctica and the Arctic?

What’s the deal with Antarctica and the Arctic? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Perhaps the biggest misunderstanding is that the Arctic and Antarctic are similar. One’s in the north and the other is in the south; but other than that, they’re the same, right? No, this couldn’t be more wrong. These polar opposites are literally polar opposites.
For starters, the Arctic is a small, shallow ocean surrounded by land: Eurasia, Greenland, Canada and the United States. It’s only about 5 ½ million square miles, which is five times smaller than the Atlantic and 11 times smaller than the Pacific. Antarctica, on the other hand, is a continent surrounded by the entire Southern Ocean.

This may seem like no big deal, but it makes all the difference in the world. It takes a lot of energy to change water temperature compared to what it takes to change land temperature, which means Arctic seawater isn’t as cold as the continental ice sheet covering Antarctica. So, the Arctic sea ice (frozen sea water) is about 10 feet thick, whereas the Antarctic ice sheet (compacted freshwater ice) is over a mile thick."

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, Arctic, Antarctica.


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Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, November 12, 2014 9:05 PM

It would be nice to keep both

Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, November 17, 2014 2:51 PM

If we are

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Visualizing Earth's Physical Systems

Visualizing Earth's Physical Systems | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"An animated map of global wind and weather. Join the Facebook community.  Seen here are the dual menaces, Cyclone Hudhud and Typhoon Vongfong (as seen from ISS)."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 7, 2014 2:18 PM

Earlier I shared a dynamic map of near-live wind data for the United States and a static rendering of global wind patterns.  This combines the features of both of those resources to provide a mesmerizing digital globe.  This visualization of global weather conditions is updated every three hours from supercomputer data projections.  Click on the 'earth' text in the lower left-hand corner to customize the display.  For examining the wind patterns and oceans currents, this is much more useful than Google Earth; this is definitely one of my favorite resources.


Tagsphysical, weather and climate, mapping, visualization.

Pam Anderson's curator insight, October 12, 2014 11:48 AM

this might interest some of our teachers who are studying weather With their students.  I just think this site is fascinating!

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What Happens When a Hurricane Meets a Volcano?

What Happens When a Hurricane Meets a Volcano? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
When Iselle crosses the Big Island of Hawaii, it will offer a rare glimpse at a clash of the titans

 

Tags: disasters, Oceania, physical, weather and climate.


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Cassie Brannan's curator insight, August 27, 2014 9:55 AM

When Hurricane Iselle crosses Hawaii, people will wonder what will happen to the Kilauea Volcano. The gases and particles that pour out of the volcano could make the hurricane severe and it could put people in great danger. Change in pressure from a large storm can generate earthquakes. Most of the volcano's actions take place underground and it would make the Earthquake less threatening.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:35 AM
The Kilauea volcano in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park erupts sporadically, oozing lava and sending up white plumes of volcanic gases. So, the people of Hawaii are used to little hit from nature every now and then, but they are foreign to hurricanes in Hawaii. So, when Hurricane Iselle passes through, scientists are not sure how it will affect the volcano or if there will be any effect. Even though there has been a rarity of hurricanes in Hawaii, scientists do not expect it will have much of an effect on the volcano because previous storms with a lot of rainfall have had no effect on lava eruption in the past. Studies have shown that particles from volcanic emissions have caused water in storm clouds to divide. Therefore, scientists are predicting that the gases and particles pouring out of the volcano could make the hurricane more intense. Scientists are very interested to see what could happen when these two forces of nature clash with one another. 
Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 22, 9:33 PM

While reading this article I felt as if I had no idea what to think since a volcano can affect a hurricane so much of vice versa, who would have thought that because a volcano cause the hurricane to worsen while a hurricane can cause a volcano to erupt with lava and volcanic gasses to escape. 

 The people in Hawaii must have to prepare for the worst because they really do not know what will happen because hurricanes rarely hit this specific area.Recently there was a 4.5 magnitude hurricane as stated in the article that people are assuming was cause by the hurricane. It is crazy to think that a hurricane can do so much damage to one place in such a short amount of time. it is also scary to think that just a tiny shift in pressure can cause the such a dramatic change in someone life, affecting their homes, lives and living conditions.

Hopefully this article is correct in saying "When it strikes its going to be ferocious, but as it passes over it’s going to be very disrupted,” said by Businger.

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China’s hungry cattle feasting on alfalfa grown on Utah farm

China’s hungry cattle feasting on alfalfa grown on Utah farm | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
China has long depended on the U.S. breadbasket, importing up to $26 billion in U.S. agricultural products yearly. But increasingly, Chinese investors aren’t just buying from farms abroad. They’re buying the farms.

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Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, July 7, 2014 10:41 AM
strong>Seth Dixon's insight: China buying farm land
MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:06 PM

APHG-U5

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:15 PM

APHG-U5

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The Great Green Wall

The Great Green Wall | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The Great Green Wall initiative uses an integrated approach to restore a diversity of ecosystems to the North African landscape.

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Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 11:56 AM

I like the idea of these countries who face the same issues joining together to combat and find a solution for there problems with climate change, desertion, gentrification. I like the idea of the African continent joining arms in order to address the same issues there neighboring countries face. While Africa is always portrayed as a land ridden with war and strife with one another, this great image of all these nations uniting is a positive move towards a bright future for the continent. 

Danielle Lip's curator insight, March 15, 2:37 PM

The Great Green Wall is not actually a wall nor is it green, this areas is very dry, having no negation or biodiversity. Yet eleven countries are banning together where this "wall" coexists and they place to help bring the native plants back to life. The eleven countries that this Great Wall is included in are the Sahel-Sahara region—Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Sudan, Chad, Niger, Nigeria, Mali, Burkina Faso, Mauritania, and Senegal. The focus area in these countries will become reproduced and the living conditions in these countries will grow and become full of life once again. I believe that it is very important to keep the environment alive and well because it makes for attractive living as well as a healthy life because oxygen comes from the plants and the air.

A point made in the article said that "We want to replicate and scale up these achievements across the region. It’s very possible to restore trees to a landscape and to restore agroforestrypractices without planting any trees." I liked this statement because it shows that the people in the countries are actually going to try and I find that very important. If you lived in one of the eleven countries would you want to live in a dried up area with no places or life?

Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 25, 3:53 PM

Poor climate and poor land management such as over farming, and overgrazing has led to a significant decline in arable land in the Sahel region. Under the Great Green Wall initiative scientists are working to restore land that used to be rich with diverse plant life. Eleven countries; Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Sudan, Chad, Niger, Nigeria, Mali, Burkina Faso, Mauritania, and Senegal have joined the Great Green Wall Initiative and are working to reduce land degradation and restore their native plant life. Hopefully this ties in with my last article on the food shortages of the Sahel.