AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Volcanic ash covers Costa Rica towns

Volcanic ash covers Costa Rica towns | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A volcano erupts in central Costa Rica, belching smoke and ash up to 3,000m (9,840ft) into the air and choking nearby communities.

 

Tags: Costa Rica, disasters, physical, volcano.


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Meander? I ‘ardly know ‘er!

Meander? I ‘ardly know ‘er! | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 3:27 PM

This is brilliant.  I can't say how much I love this. 

 

Tagsphysical, fluvial, geomorphology, landscape, funart.

YEC Geo's curator insight, April 28, 9:08 AM
Love geomorphology comics.
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Utah's Great Salt Lake is shrinking

Utah's Great Salt Lake is shrinking | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Human activity is playing a role in the dwindling size of Utah's Great Salt Lake, according to new research.While the research group acknowledged the role that climate fluctuations, such as droughts and floods, have played in the shift of the lake's water levels over time, the decrease in the lake's size is predominantly due to human causes. According to the report, the heavy reliance on consumptive water uses has reduced the lake level by 11 feet and its volume by 48 percent.

 

Tags: physical, Utah, environment modify, environment, water.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 6, 12:15 PM

The railroad causeway that creates the color difference between the northern and sotuhern portions of the Great Lake is as the Union Pacific plans to change the causeway; the proposed bridge would allow for the two distinct salinities to intermingle more.  Environmentally, this lake is not exceptional.  Like many lakes in dry climates with growing populations, the people are using the freshwater flow into the lakes more extensively than they have in the past.  The Great Salt Lake, the Aral Sea, Lake Chad, Lake Urmia, and the Dead Sea are all drying up.  

Sally Egan's curator insight, April 10, 11:05 PM
Another great example of human activities changing the biophysical environment.
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What Are You Flying Over? This App Will Tell You

What Are You Flying Over? This App Will Tell You | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Flyover Country uses maps and data from various geological and paleontological databases to identify and give information on the landscape passing beneath a plane. The user will see features tagged on a map corresponding to the ground below. To explain the features in depth, the app relies on cached Wikipedia articles. Since it works solely with a phone’s GPS, there’s no need for a user to purchase in-flight wifi. Sitting in your window seat, you can peer down on natural features like glaciers and man-made features, such as mines, and read articles about them at the same time.

 

Tags: mobility, transportation, technology, physical, geology.


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YEC Geo's curator insight, March 12, 10:01 AM
Kind of like your own personal Google Earth.
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It's official: a global mass extinction is under way

It's official: a global mass extinction is under way | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"New research confirms that the next mass extinction is in progress, and we’re the cause. There’s been little doubt that humans have been severely altering the planet and reducing biodiversity, but it has been unclear how many species go extinct under normal circumstances, without human influence.

This new research clarifies the rate of 'background extinction' (the rate of extinction during the point before humans became a primary contributor to extinction). The research confirms that human activity is driving species extinct at a rate far higher than the background rate. A look at previous events suggests cause for concern. Geologists recognize five previous mass extinction events— the end of the Ordovician, Devonian, Permian, Triassic, and Cretaceous periods, meaning that we’re now in the 6th."

 

Tags: physical, biogeography, environment, ecology, environment modify, sustainability, geology.


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Ivan Ius's curator insight, February 28, 7:03 PM

Geographic Thinking Concepts: Patterns and Trends; Interrelationships;

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How Meteorology Changed Agriculture Forever

How Meteorology Changed Agriculture Forever | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Early meteorology helped farmers predict yield, transforming the agricultural industry.

 

Complaining over the weather is not new, but the science of studying the weather, and its effects on business, is fairly recent. Around [1920], economists were also starting to use statistical methods to predict yield. Although cotton’s price, as shown on the New York Cotton Exchange, fluctuated daily, a “well-known American economist” discovered that he could make the most accurate total yield predictions—more accurate than those of the government crop reports—by analyzing the average weather conditions from May to August. It was now possible to predict when the crops would have a bumper year or a poor one.

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, food production, agribusiness, agriculture.


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Wind Forecast

Wind Forecast | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Ubercool wind animation all over the world. Wind and weather forecast for kiters, surfers, pilots and anyone else.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 1, 2015 3:23 PM

With people on the East Coast concerned about the possible trajectories for Hurricane Joaquin, I think it is the right time to share this interactive map.  In the past I shared a dynamic map of near-live wind data for the United States and a mesmerizing digital globe with wind data.  This new one though, includes multiple meteorological layers with forecasts for the next two weeks...very cool.     

Tagsphysical, weather and climate, mapping, visualization.

Diane Johnson's curator insight, October 19, 2015 9:45 PM

Useful for examining wind power in various areas.

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Lakes On A Glacier

"How deep is that icy blue water on Greenland's ice sheet? Dr. Allen Pope, of the National Snow and Ice Data Center, is using data from the NASA/USGS Landsat 8 satellite to find out. In this video, Dr. Pope shares what he sees when he looks at a Landsat image of the Greenland ice sheet just south of the Jakobshavn Glacier.

Because the lakes are darker than the ice around them, they absorb more energy from the sun. A little bit of melt concentrates in one place, and then melts more, establishing a feedback mechanism accelerating the growth of the lake. When the lakes get big enough they can force open fractures that then drill all the way down to the bed of the glacier, transporting this water to the base where it can temporarily speed up the flow of the ice."


Tags: physical, geomorphology, landforms, erosion, climate change, Greenland, remote sensing, geospatial.


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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 8, 2015 1:06 PM

unit 1 and summer read

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Ring of Fire

Ring of Fire | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The Ring of Fire is a string of volcanoes and sites of seismic activity, or earthquakes, around the edges of the Pacific Ocean.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 2015 12:20 PM

The Ring of Fire is a series of plate boundaries where earthquakes and volcanic activity are commonplace.  Surrounding the edge of the Pacific Ocean, the Ring of Fire consists of a string of 452 volcanoes.


Tags physical, tectonics, disasters, K12.

Loreto Vargas's curator insight, July 2, 2015 10:07 AM

“El Anillo de Fuego” es una cadena de volcanes y lugares de actividad sísmica, o temblores, alrededor de los límites del Océano Pacífico.

“L’Anneau de Feu” c’est une chaine de volcans et de sites d’activité sismique, ou tremblements de terre, autour de limites de l’Océan Pacifique.

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 2015 3:54 PM

The Ring of Fire is a series of plate boundaries where earthquakes and volcanic activity are commonplace.  Surrounding the edge of the Pacific Ocean, the Ring of Fire consists of a string of 452 volcanoes.

 

Tags: physical, tectonics, disasters, K12.

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India heatwave kills 800 as capital's roads melt

India heatwave kills 800 as capital's roads melt | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"At least 800 people have died in a major heatwave that has swept across India, melting roads in New Delhi as temperatures neared 50 degrees Celsius (122 Fahrenheit).  Hospitals are on alert to treat victims of heatstroke and authorities advised people to stay indoors with no end in sight to the searing conditions.  In the worst-hit state of Andhra Pradesh, in the south, 551 people have died in the past week as temperatures hit 47 degrees Celsius on Monday." 

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, India, South Asia.


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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 10, 2015 5:58 AM

People often underestimate the effects of a strong heat wave. Extremely hot temperatures can be as deadly as hurricanes and tornadoes. The temperature  in India was so hot, that the pavement on the roads actually melted. At least 800 people have died as a result of this heat wave. That number is quit shocking. India does not have the inherit infrastructure to deal with large scale disasters. The rural areas of the nation have suffered the most casualties. Those areas are also the more undeveloped areas of India. This is yet another reminder of the terror nature can inflict on the human landscape.

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 15, 2015 1:46 PM

The reality of everyday life in the differing geographies of the world vary, especially within the vast subcontinent that is India. From the freezing plains of the north to the tropical south, India experiences a wide array of weather, some of which can be extreme. This is certainly the case in this article, where some 800+ people have perished in the extreme heat wave that has hit much of the nation. Temperatures are warmer than the seasonal norm by 12 degrees Fahrenheit, leaving many restricted to the relative comforts of their homes. Such extreme highs of 122 degrees seem unfathomable to many Americans, particularly up north. Even in Las Vegas, where I spent 3 days this summer and felt like I was slowly being cooked, was a "meager" 108 degrees. The infrastructure of the US also allows for a level of comfort in these conditions that is virtually unattainable for many citizens of India, who often lack basic plumbing, let alone air conditioning. The death tolls will only continue to rise as these conditions persist, and their frequencies will most likely increase as human-generated climate change continues to accelerate. 

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 20, 2015 4:24 PM

we really ever hear about extreme weather like this unless it affects us directly. "551 people have died in the last week" This is a state of emergency but those in the west will never hear about it. What a shame. I wonder if part of it is that politics in the west wouldn't want you hearing about this as it might support the climate change agenda.

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Nepal earthquake: Hundreds die, many feared trapped

Nepal earthquake: Hundreds die, many feared trapped | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
At least 970 people have died as Nepal suffered its worst earthquake for more than 80 years, with deaths also reported in India, Tibet and Bangladesh.

 

Tags: Nepal, disasters, physical, tectonics.


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Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 18, 2015 12:48 PM

We have learned that the Himalayas are growing everyday while our Appalachians in the united states are shrinking. What does this all mean? In the platonic spectrum it means in Nepal, earthquakes.

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California Drought Tests History of Endless Growth

California Drought Tests History of Endless Growth | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A punishing drought is forcing a reconsideration of whether the aspiration of untrammeled growth that has for so long been the state’s engine has run against the limits of nature.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 6, 2015 8:30 PM

Major urban areas in California have limited local water resources so they draw water from large area to bring in sufficient water for these burgeoning metropolitan regions.  With this current drought getting worse, California has ordered emergency water restrictions on residents while companies and large farms have been granted exemptions even though they account for 82% of the state's annual water consumption (residential accounts for 12%). Almond farms alone consume 10% of the state's water, and many agricultural crops are incredibly water intensive land uses.  A better way to think of it isn't just about raw water usage though.  A better question to ask would be this--how does one gallon of water translate into calories that most efficiently feed people?


Questions to Ponder: How does the concept of carrying capacity relate to California urban growth/drought issues?  California passed its carrying capacity?  How are demographics, economics, politics and the environment intertwined in California?  What are the environmental limits on urban growth and development? 


Tags: physical, weather and climate, consumptionCalifornia, water, environment, resources, environment dependurban ecology.

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, April 9, 2015 8:49 AM

The mathematics of endless growth due to economic monetary rules has a clear outcome.

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Volcanic Eruption

"WebCams de Mexico archives the best of webcam videos in Mexico."


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Mr Inniss's curator insight, March 20, 2015 9:28 AM

watch an eruption in action

Paul Farias's curator insight, April 9, 2015 12:43 PM

It almost reminds me of a blemish that needs to be tended to on the face of the earth and it just couldn't handle the pressure anymore. My fascination with the way the earth does things blows my mind. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 22, 2015 8:20 AM

Their is nothing on earth more amazing and terrifying than a volcanic eruption. As mentioned in class, Mexico has a number of active volcanos. The most troubling one is the volcano near Mexico City. An Eruption of that volcano would spell doom for portions of Mexico City, and a wider doom for the whole nation. As a primate city, destruction in Mexico City would be devastating to the overall health of the Mexican economy. We can only hope that Mexico will be prepared to deal with the ramifications of such an eruption.

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Animals Rule Chernobyl 30 Years After Nuclear Disaster

Animals Rule Chernobyl 30 Years After Nuclear Disaster | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Three decades later, it’s not certain how radiation is affecting wildlife—but it’s clear that animals abound.

 

It may seem strange that Chernobyl, an area known for the deadliest nuclear accident in history, could become a refuge for all kinds of animals—from moose, deer, beaver, and owls to more exotic species like brown bear, lynx, and wolves—but that is exactly what Shkvyria and some other scientists think has happened. Without people hunting them or ruining their habitat, the thinking goes, wildlife is thriving despite high radiation levels.

 

Tags: National Geographic, physical, biogeography, environment, ecology, environment modify, disasters.


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Thanks to Humans, the Great Salt Lake Is Drying Up

Thanks to Humans, the Great Salt Lake Is Drying Up | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Diverting more water could pose serious health and economic threats to Utah.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 11, 9:12 PM

Follow-up: The drying up of the lake can't be blamed on the current drought, this is a human-induced modification of the environment.  This lake is not exceptional, even if the imagery is startling.  Like many lakes in dry climates with growing populations, the people are using the freshwater flow into the lakes more extensively than they have in the past.  The Great Salt Lake, the Aral Sea, Lake Chad, Lake Urmia, and the Dead Sea are all drying up.  

 

Tags: physical, Utah, environment modifyenvironment, water.

Teagan M's curator insight, April 21, 9:13 AM
Date: April 21think that we should stop using up the lake and keep it as is because any more damage could cause it to be totally destroyed and potentially bad for the economy. Protecting the lake is the best thing they could do right now, but Any more damage and they might never be able to make it go back to the way it was, and it could stay dry forever.
Mary Grace Bunch's comment, April 21, 10:21 PM
The Great Salt Lake in Utah is drying up which will lead to an unpromising future for the environmental health of the area. This is occurring due to the consistent reductions from rivers feeding into the lake that have been taking plays for 150 years. This past year the Great Salt Lake reached record low levels, dropping 11 feet. As a result of this increase in salinity and loss in half the volume of the lake, there is going to be trouble involving the economy and ecology of the state of Utah. This can be seen by dust storms or pollution.

The agglomeration of these rivers and gateways into the lake for human use are leading to the backwash effect. The backwash effect can be seen as the drained/dried out of water, an important resource to Salt Lake City, being drained in its regions. The impacts of the rivers outside of the lake are affecting the resources of the lake, even though it may not seem direct. Primary Economic Activities such as fishing will be impacted by the drying up of the Great Salt Lake. As a result of this, the development of Utah will be threatened. Utah is very reliant on the lake for it’s valuable resources that help them develop. A solution may be found through ecotourism. If the city is motivated in solving this problem, they could very well promote ecotourism in order to preserve the lake since Salt Lake City is very popular and many people travel there.

This article was relative to the Development Unit we are in now. It made me aware of what is going on in Utah. I never would have known this issue was occurring until I took the time to read it. I look forward to following along with this issue in the future and to see how the state of Utah will deal with it.
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Volcán Popocatépetl 27 de marzo 2016

"The Popocatépetl volcano, situated in Puebla, Mexico, erupted between March 28 and 29, spewing hot ash and gas into the atmosphere. According to reports, a 7-mile exclusion zone was put in place around the volcano." Credit: www.webcamdemexico.com


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This visually spectacular (but in terms of damage, fairly harmless) eruption is a sight to behold...especially knowing that Puebla and Mexico City aren't too far from the smoldering giant.   If your students have ever asked, "What does a volcanic eruption look like?" then you've got something ready to go.   

 

Tags: disasters, Mexico, physical, volcano.

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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, April 1, 7:56 PM

This visually spectacular (but in terms of damage, fairly harmless) eruption is a sight to behold...especially knowing that Puebla and Mexico City aren't too far from the smoldering giant.   If your students have ever asked, "What does a volcanic eruption look like?" then you've got something ready to go.   

 

Tags: disasters, Mexico, physical, volcano.

Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, April 3, 6:42 AM

This visually spectacular (but in terms of damage, fairly harmless) eruption is a sight to behold...especially knowing that Puebla and Mexico City aren't too far from the smoldering giant.   If your students have ever asked, "What does a volcanic eruption look like?" then you've got something ready to go.   

 

Tags: disasters, Mexico, physical, volcano.

Ivan Ius's curator insight, April 3, 12:01 PM

This visually spectacular (but in terms of damage, fairly harmless) eruption is a sight to behold...especially knowing that Puebla and Mexico City aren't too far from the smoldering giant.   If your students have ever asked, "What does a volcanic eruption look like?" then you've got something ready to go.   

 

Tags: disasters, Mexico, physical, volcano.

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America’s year without a winter: The 2015-2016 season was the warmest on record

America’s year without a winter: The 2015-2016 season was the warmest on record | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Every state but two were warmer than normal and all six New England states set winter records.

 

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, climate change.


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Mesmerizing Migration: Watch 118 Bird Species Migrate

Mesmerizing Migration: Watch 118 Bird Species Migrate | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"For the first time, scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology have documented migratory movements of bird populations spanning the entire year for 118 species throughout the Western Hemisphere. The study finds broad similarity in the routes used by specific groups of species—vividly demonstrated by animated maps showing patterns of movement across the annual cycle. The results of these analyses were published today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 21, 1:38 PM

This still image above doesn't do justice to this animated map of bird migrations (species key here).  While modern humans by and large are tied to particular plots of land, not all species have that same approach to gathering and using resources.  On #DarwinDay, it is important to consider the connections between biology and geography; many of the greatest biological discoveries were spatial and geographic in nature.   

 

Tagsphysicalecology, biogeography, environment, mapping, scale, location.

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The World’s Driest Desert Is in Breathtaking Bloom

The World’s Driest Desert Is in Breathtaking Bloom | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"After historic rains, Atacama, Chile is exploding with vibrant wildflowers.  Here's a softer side to the disruptive weather phenomenon known as El Nino: an enormous blanket of colorful flowers has carpeted Chile's Atacama desert, the most arid in the world. The cyclical warming of the central Pacific may be causing droughts and floods in various parts of the world, but in the vast desert of northern Chile it has also caused a vibrant explosion of thousands of species of flowers with an intensity not seen in decades."


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Pierre Ratcliffe's comment, October 31, 2015 2:56 AM
How life forms have been dormant for decades or centuries or more. The DNA of these plants were there ready when conditions were favourable.
Leonardo Wild's curator insight, October 31, 2015 9:44 AM

Amazing Nature!

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, November 2, 2015 12:32 PM

Wow! This is such an amazing thing to see happened in the driest place on Earth. The disruptive weather phenomenon, El Nino really made this place come to life by bringing rainfall and floods. A spectacular site to see, that in the most harshest physical environment, life can flourished.

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Tsunami Animation

"The largest earthquake ever recorded by instruments struck southern Chile on May 22, 1960. This 9.5 magnitude earthquake generated a tsunami that crossed the Pacific Ocean, killing as many as 2000 people in Chile and Peru, 61 people in Hilo, Hawaii, and 142 people in Japan as well as causing damage in the Marquesas Islands (Fr. Polynesia), Samoa, New Zealand, Australia, the Philippines, and in Alaska's Aleutian Islands.  To see how this tsunami compares with two recent tsunamis from Chile, please watch http://youtu.be/qoxTC3vIF1U "

 

Tags: physical, geomorphology, water, tectonics, disasters, video.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 24, 2015 8:19 AM

In 1700, Japan was hit by a tsunami; they knew that tsunamis were caused by earthquakes, but there was no earthquake of that magnitude in Japan that could have caused it.  They called it the Orphan Tsunami, and it puzzled everyone.  Centuries later, data confirmed that a massive earthquake in the Pacific Northwest occurred in 1700 and it's tsunami traveled across the ocean much like the this computer simulation of the 1960 Chile earthquake.   

Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, September 24, 2015 9:23 PM

Tsunami ocurrido en Chile el 22 de Mayo de 1960 donde murieron 2000 personas en Chile y Perú, 61 en Hilo Hawaii, 142 en Japón causando daños en Islas Marquesas Polinesia , Samoa, Nueva Zelanda, Australia, Filipinas, Alaska's Islas Aleutianas.....enlace para ver la comparación con el Tsunamis recientes en Chile (2015)

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The Earthquake That Will Devastate Seattle

The Earthquake That Will Devastate Seattle | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
When the giant fault line along the Pacific Northwest ruptures, it could be our worst natural disaster ever.

 

The Cascadia subduction zone remained hidden from us for so long because we could not see deep enough into the past. It poses a danger to us today because we have not thought deeply enough about the future. The Cascadia situation, a calamity in its own right, is also a parable for this age of ecological reckoning, and the questions it raises are ones that we all now face. How should a society respond to a looming crisis of uncertain timing but of catastrophic proportions? How can it begin to right itself when its entire infrastructure and culture developed in a way that leaves it profoundly vulnerable to natural disaster?


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Diane Johnson's curator insight, July 30, 2015 10:33 PM

This is a long read but well worth the time. "The really big one," an earthquake in the Pacific Northwest over 8.0, last happened in 1700, but seismologists know that the geological pressure on the fault lines have been building since then.  This in not a panic-inducing article, but one reminding people that the most potent natural disasters operate on cycles much longer than our lifetimes.    


Tags: disasters, physical, tectonics.

aitouaddaC's curator insight, August 3, 2015 8:42 AM

This is a long read but well worth the time. "The really big one," an earthquake in the Pacific Northwest over 8.0, last happened in 1700, but seismologists know that the geological pressure on the fault lines have been building since then.  This in not a panic-inducing article, but one reminding people that the most potent natural disasters operate on cycles much longer than our lifetimes.    

 

Tags: disasters, physical, tectonics.

geographynerd's curator insight, August 9, 2015 2:20 AM

This is a long read but well worth the time. "The really big one," an earthquake in the Pacific Northwest over 8.0, last happened in 1700, but seismologists know that the geological pressure on the fault lines have been building since then.  This in not a panic-inducing article, but one reminding people that the most potent natural disasters operate on cycles much longer than our lifetimes.    

 

Tags: disasters, physical, tectonics.

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Dramatic Confluences

Dramatic Confluences | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Confluences occur wherever two streams come together. If the gradient is low (i.e., nearly level) and the properties of the two streams are very different, the confluences may be characterized by a dramatic visible distinction as the mixing occurs only slowly."

 

Tags:  physical, fluvial, geomorphology, erosion, landscape.


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Sylvain Rotillon's curator insight, January 7, 2015 5:47 AM

Wonderful pictures of rivers confluences

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An earthquake felt across South Asia

An earthquake felt across South Asia | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The magnitude-7.8 earthquake that struck Nepal on Saturday morning destroyed parts of Kathmandu, trapped many people under rubble and killed more than 2,500 people. It was the worst to hit the country since a massive 1934 temblor killed more than 8,000."


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Joshua Mason's curator insight, April 29, 2015 11:04 AM

It's absolutely devastating what happened to Nepal. Any loss of life is a tragedy but loss of this scale is unimaginable. It's going to be a difficult rebuilding process for the Nepalese whether that's coping with the loss or physically rebuilding the nation.

 

Watching footage of shakes, what struck me the most was hundreds of year old temples crumbling. Those just aren't something you can easily rebuild. The building can eventually be replaced but the significance of it is almost lost. 

 

Those temples, like the homes in the area, were most likely not built up to a standard that could withstand earthquakes or at least earthquakes of this magnitude. It's easy to see how destruction on this scale can occur in large urban populations that were not designed to stand against such a dramatic event.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 2015 3:59 PM

I've experienced earthquakes more times than I've ever felt the need.  We used to get them all the time it seemed in Japan.  My bed would role across the room.  It got to the point where I just slept through them.  If I had even felt a shake half as violent as what Nepal went through I could not even imagine the fright.  I wonder how long the India and Eurasia tectonic plates will stay on top of each other?  Or if a few more earth quakes will split the area?  

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 1, 2015 1:52 AM

Australian Curriculum

The causes, impacts and responses to a geomorphological hazard (ACHGK053)


GeoWorld 8

Chapter 4: Hazards: causes, impacts and responses

(4.5 - 4.6 Earthquakes)

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Journey to the Center of the Earth

Journey to the Center of the Earth | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"How far would you have to travel to reach the Earth’s core? And what would you see along the way? Use this BBC interactive to dig into the truth. (BBC).  Download the National Geographic Education high-resolution illustration of Earth’s interior."


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Melissa Marshall's curator insight, April 30, 2015 8:17 PM

Interactive that would be great for Year 7 and 8 Science next term - moving through the layers of the Earth!

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Tide Makes Tombolo an Island

Tide Makes Tombolo an Island | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The historic abbey of Mont Saint-Michel became an island on March 21 after a rare “supertide” flooded a causeway.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 25, 2015 11:23 AM

Coastal physical geography produces some beautiful landforms such as tombolos.  A tombolo is created when sand deposits attach an island to a larger piece of land--think of it as special type of isthmus.  Mont St. Michel (picture above) is the world’s most famous example because of the iconic walled city with crowned with a striking medieval abbey.  As the tides fluctuated, the city and abbey were alternately connected or disconnected from the mainland.  However, a ‘super-tide’ that occurs once every 18.6 years wiped out the artificial causeway stranding motorists on France's most visited tourist destination (I wouldn't mind be stranded there right about now).  


Tags: water, physical, coastal, geomorphology, landformsFrance, tourism.

West Sound Tech Assn's curator insight, March 25, 2015 8:32 PM

Not techy but very cool!

Jacob McCullough's curator insight, May 26, 2015 5:24 PM

this was interesting mother nature shows us once again that she is in control by showing us how easily our seemingly strong structures can be swept away