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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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China’s hungry cattle feasting on alfalfa grown on Utah farm

China’s hungry cattle feasting on alfalfa grown on Utah farm | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
China has long depended on the U.S. breadbasket, importing up to $26 billion in U.S. agricultural products yearly. But increasingly, Chinese investors aren’t just buying from farms abroad. They’re buying the farms.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 6, 2:36 PM

Globalization is often described as a homogenizing force, but is also pairs together odd bed fellows.  A small Utah town near the Colorado border, Jensen is now home to the largest Chinese-owned hay farm in the United States. Utah's climate is right for growing alfalfa, and China's growing cattle industry make this a natural global partnership.  Large container ships come to the United States from China, and return fairly empty, making the transportation price relatively affordable.  While this might make economic sense on a global scale, local water concerns in the west show that this isn't without it's problems.  Water resources are scarce and many see this as a depletion of local water exported to China.  Some states see this as a threat and are considering banning foreign ownership of farmland.  This article shows the merging of various geographic themes: the global and local, the industrial and the agricultural, the human and the physical.         


Tags: agriculture, agribusinesstransportation, globalizationwaterChinaindustry, economic, physical, Utah.

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, July 7, 7:41 AM
strong>Seth Dixon's insight: China buying farm land
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The Great Green Wall

The Great Green Wall | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The Great Green Wall initiative uses an integrated approach to restore a diversity of ecosystems to the North African landscape.

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gawlab's curator insight, May 27, 9:49 AM

hopes our politics will take it for a major priority !

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 8:38 PM

Its great to see countries coming together for one purpose and in this case the "Green Wall" to help protect and restore ecosystems in North Africa.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 9:32 AM

The Green Wall hopes to restore the environment of the North African area that was destroyed by desertification from overgrazing.

Desertification is one of the many consequences of Human-Environment Interaction that comes mainly from agricultural activity.

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Logging and Mudslides

Logging and Mudslides | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In recent decades the state allowed logging — with restrictions — on the plateau above the Snohomish County hillside that collapsed in last weekend’s deadly mudslide.

Via Seth Dixon, Lilydale High School
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bye bye's comment, May 8, 5:38 PM
i agree with hi hi
hi hi's comment, May 8, 5:38 PM
who is the nob that cares about logging and mud slides
bye bye's comment, May 8, 5:40 PM
u need help guys
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Rivers from Above

Rivers from Above | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Get a unique view of these rivers beyond the banks.Photo editing by Lia Pepe

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Tracey M Benson's curator insight, February 24, 12:30 PM

Beautiful images that are a great reminder of the incredible diversity of landscapes and waterways on this fragile planet.

Woodstock School's curator insight, February 25, 2:01 AM

The Art of Geography

Mark Burgess's curator insight, February 26, 3:26 AM

Awesome rivers. i love a good river.

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Submarine Canyons

Submarine Canyons | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Submarine canyons were identified by the pre-SONAR mappers, but it wasn’t until this technological advancement that we realized how common a feature they are. We now know that there are hundreds (perhaps thousands depending on your definition) of submarine canyons incising into continental shelves and slopes all over Earth."

 

Tags: physical, environment, water, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.


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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, October 12, 2013 11:56 PM

submarine canyons are a natural underwater phenomenon with no clear explainable cause. They are located in parts of the world sush as New Zealand and off the coast of Santa Monica california. These canyons at the bottom of the ocean may have been ancient rivers from before prehistoric times, and the erosion and subduction of the tectonic plates over millions of years leave the remains of channels of rivers from the past. Another theory is that they are caused by water forces that caused the sea bed to erode and make way for an actuall canyon. With the use of Sonar technology we are still discovering phenomons of the submarine world as sciene progresses. These canyons are common and are found all over the Earth and give is an understanding of what the world may have looked like long ago.

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Can We Save Venice?

Can We Save Venice? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, October 7, 2013 9:42 AM

This detailed account of the problems faced by the people, and city, of Venice is a great account of the idea of Human Environment Interaction that is central to Human Geography. Human actions are causing the city to sink while more human actions are attempting to raise the city out of the water.

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 28, 2013 12:24 PM

It is no surprise to anyone that one day the beautiful city of Venice will one day be completely submerged under water. However looking at this map makes it hopeful that the process may be slowed down or even stopped! Looking at the map the green boxes represent the parts of Venice that have been uplifted, while the red boxes represent the parts that are sinking. What was surprising was that there appeared to be more green boxes on the map than red. Most of the boxes, both green and red, are along the coastline. I would think since most of the damage is along the coast line it would be a little easier to try and uplift. Hopefully the green boxes can make up for the red boxes in order to keep Venice from continually sinking. With these advances who knows where we will be in even another twenty years. We may be able to continue to uplift Venice to prevent it from submerging under water. It appears that the city is making progress in this process from the data given in the map. 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 12:53 AM

As we all know Venice is known for its lack of streets because the city is navigated by canals. This map shows where humans are actually causing the city to sink (in red) and where through restoration and consideration are helping the city stay afloat (Green). These little acts of restoration can become increasinly important in the future with growing population density. Lets hope that Venice doesnt get to populated though so the next generation dosent have to refer to it as the lost underwater city of venice.

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Rapid Landscape Change

Rapid Landscape Change | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
BOULDER, Colo. -- National Guard helicopters were able to survey parts of Highway 34 along the Big Thompson River Saturday. Here are some images of the destruction along the roadway.

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Byron Northmore's curator insight, November 29, 2013 5:57 AM

CD 4: The human causes and effects of landscape degradation

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 9:59 AM

By looking at these pictures you can see that the water just completely ruined this road. The road sunk in and collapsed as well. Will this road ever be safe to drive on again if it gets fixed?

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 8:24 PM
National helicopters caught these pictures along the Thompson river while the water rages next to a road. The destruction of the water and its erosion had deteriorated the road.
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The 7,000 Streams That Feed the Mississippi River

The 7,000 Streams That Feed the Mississippi River | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

" A new online tool released by the Department of the Interior this week allows users to select any major stream and trace it up to its sources or down to its watershed. The above map, exported from the tool, highlights all the major tributaries that feed into the Mississippi River, illustrating the river’s huge catchment area of approximately 1.15 million square miles, or 37 percent of the land area of the continental U.S. Use the tool to see where the streams around you are getting their water (and pollution)."

 


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 30, 2013 11:20 PM

INland water environments

Kyle Kampe's curator insight, September 4, 2013 6:40 PM

Land use is different around Mississippi River basin.

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 10:28 AM

The Mississippi River flows down the east side of the United States. Since the river is so long it has many streams that expand off it it as well. As you can see in the picture the red parts are the sections where the water has branched off the Mississippi River. It takes up almost all of the middle section of the United States. 

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Geography in the News: World Fisheries

Geography in the News: World Fisheries | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM DECLINE IN OCEAN FISHERIES The world may be running out of places to catch wild fish.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, August 5, 2013 3:42 PM

Useful for consideration of Fish as a resource in the topic Natural Resource Use in Global Challenges. 

Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 6:11 PM
its scary to see how much fishing grew over the pat years due to the growing population
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 10:39 AM

Overtime as the population has increased you can see on the map that areas have been over fished. This has caused people to move near the water to fish and it has created some jobs for them. This could be bad becuase as the population increases the fish will decrease due to the over fishing. 

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10 Awe-Inspiring Weather Phenomena

10 Awe-Inspiring Weather Phenomena | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
There are reported cases of fish and frogs raining from the sky, as well as ice bombs attacking earthlings from above.

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FCHSAPGEO's comment, September 16, 2013 3:20 PM
I thought I would add that frogs do fly through the air sometimes!
Kamaryn Hunt's comment, October 7, 2013 3:28 PM
This post was interesting to me because living in Virginia Beach, we dont see much interesting amounts of snow, nor rainfall, so we dont know about the many things weather can do. Now knowing this about weather makes it more intersting,and makes me wonder what else could happen??
Cam E's curator insight, January 29, 11:20 AM

The mystery of the world is personally one of my favorite topics, as we've not even come close to exploring every inch of our own planet. As much as I want to see us expand outwards, we should not avoid looking to our own planet with an explorer's eye like many did in the past. This particular article makes me wonder how many unexplained events that ended up in folk legend were the cause of some unique weather pattern or then-unexplained event which we better understand today. I personally saw something like this very recently. On a trip up north towards Vermont for some skiing I spotted that the moon was particularly large that one night. Later on as we were passing by Boston we saw what appeared to be a black line cutting straight through the moon. It extended to each end of the horizon and while it was a cloud, no others were in the sky, and it was so uniform throughout that it made me doubt my own common sense!

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Yosemite’s Iconic El Capitan Mapped in High-Resolution 3D

Yosemite’s Iconic El Capitan Mapped in High-Resolution 3D | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
New geologic map helps scientists understand ancient volcano’s roots and contemporary rock falls.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 13, 2013 5:06 AM

On a personal note, my very first globe and National Geographic magazines were given to me by my grandparents who noticed I had an affinity for all things geographic.  They lived just outside Yosemite Park and they made sure I explored it frequently while I was growing up so I have a soft spot for this particular national park.  My grandmother informed me that El Capitan was the largest single piece of granite on Earth and my skeptical 3rd grade mind replied, "Is that a fact or an opinion?"  Informal geographic education had a greater impact on my educational path than the formal K-12 curriculum.  Without those simple nudges, I doubt I would be a geographer today.  


Tags: Californiaphysical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.

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Meandering Stream

Meandering Stream | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"I'm used to rivers that know what they're doing."


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Hoffman's comment, September 14, 2013 10:32 AM
hmm, looks like some river had a little to much
Peter Phillips's comment, October 5, 2013 4:31 PM
All rivers move. Those that have a wide, flat basin meander most. Those meanders can be even more dramatic than in this image, snaking 10's of kilometres sideways over time. Combine this action with geological upheaval and it gets even more interesting. Check out images of the Murray River in Australia from space.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, December 6, 2013 8:34 AM

Lol... the first words that went through my head were h--- (heck) yeah.  David Bowie... sung by an astronaut... okay, back to Geography. I thought that the rivers reminded me of something I thought of during the talk in class about lava rock being changed into other kinds of rocks over time, and cycling around.  I thought on a larger scale, about this universe, and I have read before that people are studying different areas of space-time fabrics, trying to find origins of the Universe, and answers to other existential questions.  I suppose that if one could trace patterns of rivers, and if one could trace patterns of rocks, to find where they came from, and why/how they came where they came, then by examining the (assumedly tattered and marked) fabrics of space and time, people would be able to determine origins of everything from the beginning of what existed before all universes, and also the origins of life forms.  I enjoyed the movie Prometheus, which was directed by Sir Ridley Scott, and I had to say that I thought that the messages found on rocks in caves, as a catalyst that lead the cast to go visit an alien world that had something to do with human origins, could be very literally taken.  If there are clues in rocks, why wouldn't there be other clues, possibly in celluar components of life forms, or space and time?  Applying the idea of studying rocks and rivers and other physical geographical pursuits to the idea of applying it on a gigantic scale greatly appeals to me.  I believe that humans will find some answers that way, but I hadn't directly realized just that until we mentioned some stuff about physical geography, and glacial forces carrying and spreading out rocks, and deposits and erosion.  After all, the Milky Way has origins, so why believe that we came from the Milky Way, rather than beyond?

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Erosion in Action

News 8 chief photojournalist Kevyn Fowler captured a road collapsing in Freeport, Maine during a storm.

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Francisco Javier 's curator insight, May 12, 2013 5:53 PM

Erosion in Action | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog http://sco.lt/...

Shelby Porter's curator insight, December 11, 2013 7:23 PM

Normally we see erosion on a piece of land over a long period of time. In this short video, we see what erosion can do to in mere minutes. It is scary to think how much the roads we drive on are eroding right underneath our cars. It is amazing how much the environment around us can change due to the weather. 

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 9:30 PM
This video is crazy! It shows the erosion of a road during a storm. The water was supposed to run under the road and flow through a large pipe. As you can see after watching the video the road eventually erodes and then the pipe begins to bouy up and down. Later the road is completely deteriorated and the pipe ran down the river with the rest of the road.
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Colorado River Reaches the Sea of Cortez

Colorado River Reaches the Sea of Cortez | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"When the Minute 319 'pulse flow' began in March 2014, it was not clear whether the effort would be enough to reconnect the Colorado River with the Sea of Cortez. Some hydrologists thought there might be just enough water; others were less optimistic. It turns out the optimists were right, though just barely. For the first time in sixteen years, the Colorado River was reunited with the Sea of Cortez on May 15, 2014."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 28, 2:57 PM

California has had three consecutive years of below average rainfall and most reservoirs are far below their designed capacity; amid a drought this severe and wildfires, it is startling to hear of a project to restore some of the Colorado River Basin's natural patterns and ecology.  


Tags: physicalremote sensing, California, water, environmenturban ecology.

Kate Buckland's curator insight, June 7, 4:43 PM

Parallels with the Murray River...

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California's Drought

California's Drought | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"California has had three consecutive years of below average rainfall and most reservoirs are far below their designed capacity; for a state with a growing population with limited water resources this is alarming news that has many politicians, officials and residents worried. This winter was especially mild; nice for bragging to friend back East about how gorgeous the weather is during a polar vortex spell, but horrible for the snow pack and accumulation."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 10, 11:45 AM

Most of California’s water originates for the snow pack in Western mountains ranges so this drought is expected to get worse this summer. The major urban areas have limited local water resources so they draw water from large area to bring in sufficient water for these burgeoning metropolitan regions.


Questions to Consider: What are some reasons (both from human and physical geography) for this severe drought? What can be done in the short-term to lessen the problem? What can be done to make California’s water situation better for the next 50 years?


Tags: physical, weather and climate, consumptionCaliforniaLos Angeles, water, environment, resources, environment dependurban ecology.

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Angels Landing

"Since 2004, six people have died falling from the cliffs on this route." is what the sign says. Only one step from a 1400 foot fall.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 24, 6:10 AM

Angel's Landing in Utah's Zion National Park (map) is one of my favorite hikes with an amazing view.The geomorphology of 'red rock' country is stunning and it's sheer cliffs are bound to captivate the imagination.  If you want something like this but with a more European flavor, watch National Geographic's Andrew Evans climb Preikestolen in Norway.   


Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms, Utah.

Utah Geographical Alliance's curator insight, March 25, 4:22 PM

Thank you @APHumanGeog beautiful video of #Utah to remind us it is spring! Get your students outside and enjoy our beautiful home, teaching students outside can be very rewarding in teaching them about the world we live in.  

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Faults in Xinjiang : Image of the Day

Faults in Xinjiang : Image of the Day | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Colliding continents and cracks in the Earth’s crust make for some remarkable scenery in western China.

 

Just south of the Tien Shan mountains, in northwestern Xinjiang province, a remarkable series of ridges dominate the landscape. The highest hills rise up to 1,200 meters (3,900 feet) above the adjacent basins, and they are decorated with distinctive red, green, and cream-colored sedimentary rock layers. The colors reflect rocks that formed at different times and in different environments.  When land masses collide, the pressure can create what geologists call “fold and thrust belts.” Slabs of sedimentary rock that were laid down horizontally can be squeezed into wavy anticlines and synclines. 

The ridge is noticeably offset by a strike-slip or “tear” fault in the image showing the Piqiang Fault, a northwest trending strike-slip fault that runs roughly perpendicular to the thrust faults for more than 70 kilometers (40 miles). The colored sedimentary rock layers are offset by about 3 kilometers (2 miles) in this area.


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Mathijs Booden's comment, February 8, 11:40 AM
Dit hoeft geen strike-slip te zijn. Het zijn hellende lagen, dus de breuk kan ook een op- of afschuiving zijn.
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LOTS OF MAPS! Earth Science Week

LOTS OF MAPS! Earth Science Week | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Take part in Earth Science Week 2013! Held October 13-19, ESW 2013 will promote awareness of the many exciting uses of maps and mapping technologies in the geosciences. “Mapping Our World,” the theme of ESW 2013, engages young people and the public in learning how geoscientists, geographers, and other mapping professionals use maps to represent land formations, natural resource deposits, bodies of water, fault lines, volcanic activity, weather patterns, travel routes, parks, businesses, population distribution, our shared geologic heritage, and more. Maps help show how the Earth systems – geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere – interact.


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Malini Mehan's curator insight, October 6, 2013 7:49 AM

Earth Science week unleashes the mechanism to understand the  dynamic world. It is a great way to observe and understand the constanly evolving processes that bring about changes in the physical and social landscape. From the evolution of islands off the coast of southern Pakistan, as was reported after the deadly earthquake of 24th September to freak weather and migration of illegal immigrants from Europe to Africa, understanding mapping techniques would give valuable insight into the interaction of the Earth Systems.

Elaine Watkins's curator insight, October 10, 2013 11:35 PM

Some awesome activity ideas and unit plans on this site for teachers to do with Earth Science!

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, October 30, 2013 12:58 PM

Bacana! 

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The 'Underwater Waterfall' Illusion at Mauritius Island

The 'Underwater Waterfall' Illusion at Mauritius Island | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"When viewed from above, a runoff of sand and silt creates the impression of an ‘underwater waterfall’, just off the coast of the island nation of Mauritius in the Indian Ocean."


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, September 26, 2013 8:19 AM

this look pretty nice i would like to go see it in person

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 10:36 AM

By looking at this picture you automatically think its a waterfall within the water. This image is actually just showing the mix of sand and silt deposits mixing together. The light to dark colors is what makes it look like a waterfall. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:24 PM

Another spectacular sight. Of course, you will need a plane or helicopter to venture above it to see it, but this illusion is pretty nifty.

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This Pulsing Earth

This Pulsing Earth | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Spring comes, then summer, fall and winter and if you are off the planet with a camera looking down at Earth, the seasons seem like breaths. Speed up the imagery, and the planet seems to pulse, like a living thing.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 15, 2013 8:00 AM

I'm sorry that this site cannot display the animated GIF version, but just follow the link to see how the seasonal rthymns of the climate and biomass pulsate (at a much slower rate than our bodies, but still a system with it's ebbs and flows).  


Tags: physical, remote sensing, geospatial, biogeography, weather and climate, Arctic.

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Earth Structural Layer Cake

Earth Structural Layer Cake | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"One of their lessons [in a series involving geologic sciences] involved teaching the kids about the structure of the Earth. One of her friends came up with the idea of presenting a model of the Earth made out of cake. So my sister asked me if I could make a spherical cake with all the layers of the Earth inside it."


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Joanne Wegener's curator insight, August 26, 2013 4:42 AM

For all of those super-keen cooks out there ... what a cool idea!

Canberra Girls Grammar GSSF's comment, September 1, 2013 7:30 PM
Year 8 Unit 1
Courtney Burns's curator insight, December 7, 2013 4:58 PM

I think that this came out awesome! I definetly don't think that I would be able to pull something like this off. However what I found intersting about this was that it was like a cake map. Students were able to get a visual about what the earth's core is like. It visually shows them all the different layers of the earth. Just by visually seeing the cake like this will help a lot more kids to remember this lesson. Also by the baker putting the countries in their accurate locations makes this cake even that much better. They are veiwing a map and they don't even know it. I think this cake is a great tool to use to show students just how the earth is actually made up. By allowing the students to visually see it also makes it more likely for them to remember the material. Viewing maps can teach so much, which is why I think this "cake map" is an awesome way to teach and get the kids attention!

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Earth's Green Places Mapped

"Although 75% of the planet is a relatively unchanging ocean of blue, the remaining 25% of Earth's surface is a dynamic green. Data from the NASA/NOAA Suomi NPP satellite is able to detect these subtle differences in greenness. The resources on this page highlight our ever-changing planet, using highly detailed vegetation index data from the satellite, developed by scientists at NOAA. The darkest green areas are the lushest in vegetation, while the pale colors are sparse in vegetation cover either due to snow, drought, rock, or urban areas. Satellite data from April 2012 to April 2013 was used to generate these animations and images."


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Louis Culotta's curator insight, July 16, 2013 2:05 PM

This is something to check out if you want to see first hand look at the green and not so green places on our planet. It really makes you see the parts of the world that get enough rain and the areas that don't that makes what we see from Satellite images from space.

Magnus Gustafsson's curator insight, July 16, 2013 2:13 PM

Useful insiight how we humans can change the world!

Al Picozzi's comment, July 18, 2013 8:19 AM
Can really see the effect of development in the Amazon river basin. Also this system can be a great use to help in areas that are facing a drought.
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Land Unseen: What's Beneath Antarctica's Ice?

Land Unseen: What's Beneath Antarctica's Ice? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Many of us tend to think of Antarctica as a sheet of solid snow and ice. But, in contrast with its peer to the north, the southern pole's ice sheet lies atop a rocky continent. What are its features, its mountains and valleys, plains and coastlines?

A new dataset from the British Antarctic Survey provides the most detailed map ever of the bedrock below, information scientists hope will enable them to better model the affects of climate change on the ice, whose melting will have an impact on climate the world over."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 14, 2013 11:12 AM

This video sheds some light on explorations to uncover truths about one of the most remote places on Earth.


Tags: Antarctica, water, physical, remote sensing, geospatial.


Johani Karonen's curator insight, June 17, 2013 1:46 AM

Talking about challanges - Amundsen and Scott sure had a tough one!

Jason, Charlie's curator insight, October 3, 2013 10:33 AM

This is the Intellctual part of Antarctica. This video talks about what is underneathAntarctica. Its' ice is flowing out towardsstone sea and could contribute to sea rise. If Antarctica didn't have anymoreonce our ocean would have a major rise but Antarctica would be a new place. 

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Popocatépetl

Popocatépetl | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 12, 2013 6:18 AM

This image is from June 11, 2013, but if you click on the link you will see an image of Popocatépetl that is refreshed every minute.  This massive volcano looms over Mexico City and plays a key role in the mythology of the city.  The images are taken from a relatively new station in Tochimilco (clouds or intense weather might occasionally limit the visibility of the volcano).


Tags: Mexico, physical.

sabina cardascia's curator insight, June 12, 2013 4:26 PM

horror!!!

Brett Sinica's curator insight, September 29, 2013 10:11 AM

Among active volcanos in the world, this would be an extremly devastating one if it were to explode.  Less than 50 miles from Mexico City, which is home to more than 20 million people in its entirety could be of threat.  Just this year in July, there was steam and ash released which cancelled flights in and out of Mexico City and Toluca.  That's a mere fraction of what could happen if this volcano had a full-blown explosion.  On a lighter note, on days with good weather, this volcano is quite a spectacle of nearby cities and is the second highest peak in Mexico.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
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As coast erodes, names wiped off the map

As coast erodes, names wiped off the map | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
For decades, south Louisiana residents have watched coastal landmarks disappear as erosion worsened and the Gulf of Mexico marched steadily inward.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 9, 2013 11:54 AM

Just because you've mapped a physical land feature, it doesn't mean it will stay that way forever.  This is a reminder that the Earth and it's cultural and physical landscapes are constantly changing. 


Tagsmapping, erosion, landscape. 

Sylvain Rotillon's comment, May 9, 2013 11:57 AM
The eprverse effect of maps is that they give the false idea that our physical world is steady. It's the case as we see here for coastal environments, but also for rivers.
Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 8:12 AM

I find it quite facinating how the world changes. Some of the worlds most beautiful things may not be here 30 years from now. It is quite humbling that things that man builds can be taken away by Mother Nature. As the years pass the memories made will be vanished by the environment.