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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Will American Pot Farmers Put the Cartels out of Business?

Will American Pot Farmers Put the Cartels out of Business? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
They've driven prices so low that Mexican growers are giving up.

 

For the first time ever, many of the farmers who supply Mexican drug cartels have stopped planting marijuana, reports the Washington Post. "It's not worth it anymore," said Rodrigo Silla, a lifelong cannabis farmer from central Mexico. "I wish the Americans would stop with this legalization."  Facing stiff competition from pot grown legally and illegally north of the border, the price for a kilogram of Mexican schwag has plummeted by 75 percent, from $100 to $25.


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Alec Castagno's curator insight, September 23, 2014 11:00 AM

As marijuana becomes more common and increasingly legitimized in the United States, the international drug market is beginning to feel the effects. Drug cartel traffickers have begun settling and growing on American soil, but it would seem even that will not help them compete with the new mass of medical and recreational marijuana grown "professionally" elsewhere in the country. This, paired with other news articles claiming states can earn billions off marijuana taxes, offer more support to the argument for legalization.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 13, 2014 7:39 PM

This article shows that what happen in one country can have an effect on another. The decriminalization of marijuana in the U.S is causing the business of the cartels to drop 75%, and with the DEA spending $2 billion to keep illegal drugs from crossing the border, it is making people feel safer.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:44 PM

Many hold hope that the legalization of Marijuana in the United States will take away much of the Mexican and South American drug cartels' power. These cartels thrive off selling illegal drugs to Americans in return for exorbitant amounts of money. If we are able to legalize these drugs within the country the need for cartels will hopefully diminish over time. While this won't fully eliminate them as they also deal in other drugs this is definitely a step in the right direction.

 

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Crack Shack or Mansion?

Crack Shack or Mansion? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Can you tell a Vancouver mansion from a crack shack?

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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 4:31 PM


In this world any house can be held as a drug location. in the neighbor I live there was a house that broken into by the cops in which they found hundreds of pounds of drugs and none of the neighbors knew. We thought it was an abandoned home. a crack shack or mansion it is difficult to determine if it is or not.

Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 10:58 AM

This I found to be very interesting. To me it was very sterotypical and much harder than I thought it would be. I figured it would be easy to depict a Mansion from a Crack Shack, but I guess I was wrong. Different areas different lifestyles.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 25, 2014 9:55 AM

A fairly funny game that makes fun of the astronomical real estate prices in Vancouver, BC. I actually wasn't incredibly surprised as I've watched some HGTV. Since many of the shows are Canadian imports the extremely high priced homes in Vancouver and Toronto are often featured.

 

I guessed 10/16. The game should branch out to Toronto, we might've caught a glimpse of Rob Ford.

 

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Legalized Marijuana in the USA

Legalized Marijuana in the USA | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Washington state has become the first in America to allow the recreational use of cannabis, setting up a potential showdown with the US federal government.

 

The states that have legalized recreational marijuana use reflect regional differences in cultural and communal values within the United States.  This is quite a quandry with fascinating ramifications as popular cultural values clash with political tradition. 

 

Questions to Ponder: What will the Federal government do considering that a state law is contradicting a federal law?  Will other states follow?  Would a California employee fail a drug test is the drugs were legally consumed in a different state?  Will Washington and Colorado receive more weekend tourism?   


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Wikinarco: mapping narcoviolence

Wikinarco: mapping narcoviolence | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
RT @WomanVote: Wikinarco: mapping narcoviolence – Boing Boing http://t.co/OtsB8wni #Mexico #NarcoWar #violence...

 

The drug violence in Mexico has been a huge problem recently, but technology is allowing citizens new ways to combat the problem in the absence of effective governance. 

 


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Shifting sands: Changing Geography of the Mexican Drug War

Shifting sands: Changing Geography of the Mexican Drug War | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

FIVE years ago next week, Felipe Calderón took office as Mexico’s president and launched a crackdown against organised crime.

 

While the rates of murders are plateauing at 12,000 per year, internally where are these murders taking place?  Which places are becoming more critical to control?  Murders are shifting east (From Sinaloa and Chihuahua to Nuevo Leon and Veracruz).  Why is this shift occurring?  What does this shift indicate politically and economically for Mexico?


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, September 29, 2013 1:27 PM

These numbers are astonishing especially when based simply on drugs, money, and power.  Compared to the article where it described Tijuana as still being one of the major cities for murder, the numbers and color scheme seem to show the region as one of the areas with less murders.  Heading south into the country, is Mexico City.  The city which is surrounded by such a large metropolitan area with a vast gap between poor and rich tends to have low murder rates.  This is very interesting considering popular belief tends to focus on such violence being conducted in large cities where there is better chance of cartels using the neighborhoods and people within them to strengthen their empire.  This makes me wonder if the authorities are too strong for cartels to infiltrate and become powerful, or on a limb, do the cartels have a mutual agreement not to do business in the country's economical and cultural hub?

Julia & Eva's curator insight, November 29, 2013 5:34 PM

This artilce falls under the category of political. It shows that Mexico's continuing drug war has effected the people that live there with lots of violence. By getting a new president, their murder rates have gone down, which has had a significant benefit on their country.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 3, 2014 1:20 PM

In Mexico there is a long standing tradition of the cartels working with officials to make sure their drug operation remain intact. With opportunities at a minimum in these rural areas where drug lords exist, the drug business provides youths with an opportunity they would otherwise not have. In Mexico the informal economy keeps many of these states in business. This shift is only evidence of where police are cracking down and where disputed territories exist. Cartels that have a stronghold over a territory with police cooperation don't need to increase their causality rate to maintain order.

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A quieter drug war in Mexico, but no less deadly

A quieter drug war in Mexico, but no less deadly | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Months have gone by since the last of the grisly mass killings that have marked the conflict’s darkest moments.

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Kendra King's curator insight, February 2, 10:46 PM

The past custom of “presentation” that put a huge focus on the cartel won’t totally leave the Mexican culture. According to the article, the concept of “presentation” meant that Mexicans put the criminals on TV display before being officially arrested. Even though the new leader is now trying to readjust so as to give the cartels less public attention, the cartels are still be on the minds of his citizens since it was so ingrained in their lives due he the prior president’s focus on the cartel. Already, according to the article, media sources were reveling that the number of deaths were “higher” during the president’s first month in office “than during the same month in previous years.” In fact, the President was already asking that his term’s “success” be measured by if he can “slow the pace of the killings.” Thus showing that the cartels will still be the measurement of his time in office and still a major part of the Mexican culture even if the new leader is trying to keep the topic of the cartels on the “quieter” side.   

 

Another factor pulling the new president back towards the cartels is the United States. Under the theory of sovereignty the new President, Pena Nieto, should be able to govern as he wishes. However because the drugs spill over onto American soil, the new president had to quickly clarify that his stance on the cartels won’t wavier in order to keep its stronger next door neighbors appeased. On the one hand this is smart, because then he can use the United States’s help when it comes to aid or any other issues regarding the fight against the cartels. At the same time though, “it locks” him into a similar relationship despite his requests to discuss other topics as the article mentioned. Once again reinforcing that the cartels will be what overshadows his term. 

 

I find the situation to be unfortunate. The leader’s new ideas on “education and poverty” might actually help decrease the fighting with the cartels in the long run while helping Mexico’s population. Yet, as the article mentions, he needs fast results in bringing the cartel killing down to keep his countries support and neither of the new agenda items will do such things. I fear that with the constituents focusing on the drug war too much, he will get sucked back into fighting the cartels and will then give up some of these goals. Who knows though, on some level this maybe for the best in terms of the economic success of the United States. We do need their country to be in some sort of economic straits in order to continue attracting their population here to pick the food we need. I guess one countries misfortune seems to be another’s fortune. 

Danielle Lip's curator insight, February 3, 12:39 PM

The drug wars are deadly and have been around for years, this deadly violence has been around for a while yet just recently the violence has quieted down, not stopped but the mafia's have gone to locations where less attention is drawn to them. To try and stop the drug wars could be very risky for the government, the drug war leaders are walking fine lines with the government, trying to make trade with the United States all about drugs which could cause some controversy. Imagine if there were drug wars in the United States, how would the government handle it?

Louis Mazza's curator insight, February 6, 3:35 PM

Prior to a few months ago the drug cartels in Mexico were running rampant. It was no longer an under the ropes operation like pre-2000. The Cartels were massacring, beheading people and performing great acts of violence such as the slaughter of 72 migrants near the border, or the dumping of 50 human torsos on the highway. The military responded by parading captured cartel members through the streets and calling in more and more back-up troops. Mexico is extremely dangerous when this activity goes on. That has recently all come to a public halt. The perceived danger/violence rate in Mexico has been dropping but at the same time the number of drug related deaths has not. It seems that the cartels have smartened up and understand now that the great acts of violence only brings more pressure onto them. Now the cartel tries to avoid the military as much as possible as the added backup and highway patrol’s give the drug smugglers issues.

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Legalized Marijuana in the USA

Legalized Marijuana in the USA | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Washington state has become the first in America to allow the recreational use of cannabis, setting up a potential showdown with the US federal government.


The states that have legalized recreational marijuana use reflect regional differences in cultural and communal values within the United States.  This is quite a quandry with fascinating ramifications as popular cultural values clash with political tradition. 

 

Questions to Ponder: What will the Federal government do considering that a state law is contradicting a federal law?  Will other states follow?  Would a California employee fail a drug test is the drugs were legally consumed in a different state?  Will Washington and Colorado receive more weekend tourism?   


Via Seth Dixon
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