AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
7.2K views | +2 today
Follow
AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How Eratosthenes calculated the Earth's circumference

"In the mid-20th century we began launching satellites into space that would help us determine the exact circumference of the Earth: 40,030 km. But over 2000 years earlier, a man in Ancient Greece came up with nearly the exact same figure using just a stick and his brain."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 1, 2016 1:19 PM

Eratosthenes is often referred to as the "father of geography" for creating meridians and parallels on his maps to organize global information, classifying climatic zones, and as shown in the video, calculating the circumference of the Earth. Plus, he coined the terms so he gets the credit. If you have never pondered the meaning of the word "geometry," the accomplishments of Eratosthenes will certainly show that the mathematical prowess was at the heart of expanding our collective geographic knowledge (additionally, here is a retro Carl Sagan in a video clip from Cosmos that inspired this clip).    

 

Tagsmapping, math, locationSTEM, historical.

ROCAFORT's curator insight, November 18, 2016 3:07 AM
How Eratosthenes calculated the Earth's circumference
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Looking For Real-World Math Problems? Try Google Earth!

Looking For Real-World Math Problems? Try Google Earth! | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Aiming to get kids to understand and solve real-world math problems, one teacher developed a tool that uses Google Earth.

 

Tags: math, google.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Anna Sasaki's curator insight, March 22, 2015 2:42 PM

There is a new programme which helps students truly understand the usage of math skills being taught in school. It is a game that students may play, which actually put the math skills learned in school into play. This solves the time old question of "when will I ever use this?" It is very fun and uses Google maps to manifest questions for each sections from grades 5-10. It is putting more use of the Google maps and helps others learn about geography as it is using the maps.

This shows another way to use Google maps, which uses a GIS system to track locations. The online maps presents many different opportunities of teaching others, through various methods, and geography can be present in any topic shown. Geography can help others learn through spatial recognition in the case of math, and many other ideas.

Woodstock School's curator insight, March 23, 2015 1:39 AM

“Pray tell us, what's your favorite number?"...
"Shiva jumped up to the board, uninvited, and wrote 10,213,223"...
"And pray, why would this number interest us?"
"It is the only number that describes itself when you read it, 'One zero, two ones, three twos, two threes'.”
― Abraham Varghese, Cutting for Stone  

Matthew Connealy's curator insight, March 23, 2015 10:26 PM

The use of Google Earth is becoming beneficial to Thomas Petra, a middle school teacher that is trying to make learning more interesting. By using Google Earth, he is able to teach lessons in a more interactive and applicable way. An example of this would be when his students learned about distance through the Alaskan dog sledders and their travels. The students are able to learn much more than the conventional way of learning and are able to gain a better sense of the phenomena around them.

 

Although this was used in a mathematical setting, Google Earth is only just beginning. Geography students would greatly benefit from this usage of the app, and more teachers should learn to harness this style of teaching. Students will be able to gain a better sense of what is going on around them, and know more about the world they live in.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Real World Math

Real World Math | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Real World Math: Using Google Earth in the Math Curriculum."   Back to my interdisciplinary approach to strengthening geographic education, image hearing that there is a Math teacher at your school using this, wouldn't you want to be a part of it?  Too often knowledge is taught within disciplinary silos; students need opportunities to make real world connections between the disciplines to breath life into how they are taught.  This site reminds me of http://www.googlelittrips.org/ which allows real world geography to be a part of literature/English classes.    


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Eratosthenes calculation for the size of the earth around 240 BC


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 1, 2016 12:45 PM

Eratosthenes is often referred to as the "father of geography" for creating meridians and parallels on his maps to organize global information, classifying climatic zones, and as shown in the video, calculating the circumference of the Earth. Plus, he coined the terms so he gets the credit. If you have never pondered the meaning of the word "geometry," the accomplishments of Eratosthenes will certainly show that the mathematical prowess was at the heart of expanding our collective geographic knowledge. 

 

Tagsmapping, math, location, historical.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from ApocalypseSurvivalSkills
Scoop.it!

Spatial Navigation Before GPS

Spatial Navigation Before GPS | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Giant 70-foot concrete arrows that point your way across the country, left behind by a forgotten age of US mail delivery.  Long before the days of radio (and those convenient little smartphone applications), the US Postal service began a cross-country air mail service using army war surplus planes from World War I.  The federal government funded enormous concrete arrows to be built every 10 miles or so along established airmail routes they were each built alongside a 50 foot tall tower with a rotating gas-powered light. These airway beacons are said to have been visible from a distance of 10 miles high."


Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
more...
Giovanni Sonego's curator insight, December 15, 2013 1:49 PM

Adesso sembra incredibile che si usasse un sistema simile per guidare la posta aerea. Forse a quei tempi sembrava normale. 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 3:14 AM

I love articles like this one where they talk about the collide of different times. This article speaks of huge concrete arrows which were left from 1930's air mail routes. sadly most of the towers that were paired with the arrows have been dismantled but still really cool that these directional arrows from the past can still be found almost 90 years later.

Elle Reagan's curator insight, September 28, 2014 11:44 PM

Wow technology has come a long way in just a short amount of time! We would still be using  those stone arrows if it wasn't for the invention of the GPS.