AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Drought and Famine

In which John Green teaches you a little bit about drought, which is a natural weather phenomenon, and famine, which is almost always the result of human activity. Throughout human history, when food shortages strike humanity, there was food around. There was just a failure to connect those people with the food that would keep them alive. There are a lot of reasons that food distribution breaks down, and John is going to teach you about them in the context of the late-19th century famines that struck British India.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 6, 12:59 PM

Famine is exacerbated by natural factors such as drought, but those only stress the system, they rarely cause the actual starvation.  The real failure is that the political/economic systems created by governments and how they handle stains in the food production/distribution systems.  Widespread famines are very rare in democracies and are much more prevalent in authoritarian regimes.  Many of the recent examples have come from collectivation strategies that governments have implemented (currently Venezuela, but historically the Soviet Union and China).  The Choices program has some good resources about teaching current events with the famines today.

 

Tags: food, povertyhistoricalcolonialism, economic, political, governance, agriculture, crash course

 

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Battle Cry for the Bodega

Battle Cry for the Bodega | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Why the chainification of the corner store is a bigger deal than losing book stores and record stores combined.

 

The term Bodega originally referred to a neighborhood grocery in a mostly Spanish-speaking part of town, it has come to be used (in my experience) to cover just about any independently owned small grocer in the city. The fear is that the corporate behemoth (7-Eleven) will destroy the neighborhood bodega, a New York institution of long standing. The quintessential bodega is a beloved part of the fabric of the city.  The outcry has been loudest in the East Village, a neighborhood that despite gentrification still prides itself on its countercultural attitude and grimy authenticity.


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 22, 8:22 PM

When we discuss food deserts, we typically think about places that lack supermarkets.  In an urban context, the places that often fill this void are the bodegas.  In some major cities, these are going away as chains like 7-Eleven want to expand their reach and squeeze out these independent grocers. However you view this issue, “There’s no denying that the texture of the city would be flattened if the idiosyncratic bodega became an endangered species.”

 

Tags: food, urban, povertyplace, socioeconomic, food desert.

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11 Facts About Food Deserts

11 Facts About Food Deserts | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Food insecurity has a high correlation with increased diabetes rates. In Chicago, the death rate from diabetes in a food desert is twice that of areas with access to grocery stores."


Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
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Harley Bass's curator insight, January 10, 3:11 PM

This article is connected to human geography by agriculture. We talk and learn about agriculture every day in the class room. I feel like this article is a eye opener to the naive mind of people who do not live in or around food desert areas.

Hailey Austin's curator insight, January 10, 3:22 PM
This is connected to my class because its dealing with agriculture and how they have limited crops. So most of there food is manufactured and unhealthy. I think that food deserts should either be shut down or given better food options.In Chicago, the death rate from diabetes in a food desert is twice that of an area with access to a grocery store.
Mitchell Tasso's curator insight, January 11, 8:57 PM

This article/scoop is very intriguing and cool to read. It goes along with the topic of agriculture and describes the 11 facts that it bares about food deserts whether those facts are good or bad. Overall, I liked this scoop because of the 11 facts and the detail that was provided with them.

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Cotton Candy Grapes?!?

Cotton Candy Grapes?!? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 20, 2016 3:03 PM

After years of seeing fruit-flavored candy, we are now seeing candy-flavored fruit. The company Grapery is very careful to highlight that these patented fruit varieties are not GMOs, but the cotton candy flavored grapes are cross pollinated by hand (by fruit geneticists). You can watch this 4 minute CBS video about the agricultural production and marketing of this new product. Yes, I've experimented with these at a friend's house, and they really do taste like cotton candy (and no, I'm not planning on purchasing any).     

 

Questions to Ponder: Does this make you leery about eating this or totally excited to try it? How come?  Why is the company so adamant to state that these grapes are non-GMO? According to the video, what are the primary concerns of most grape producers and how does that contrast with this company?  

  

Tagsfood, food production, agribusiness, agriculture, GMOstechnology.

Shir Turgeman's curator insight, April 11, 9:24 AM
טעמו של סוג ענבים זה הוא בדיוק כמו של "שיערות סבתא" שהיינו אוכלים בתור ילדים. בנוסף, בשונה מ"שיערות סבתא", ענבים אלו אינם דביקים ואינם מלאים בתוספי סוכר אבל הם הרבה יותר מתוקים בטעמם מענבים רגילים ומכילים יותר מיץ. על ענבים אלו מדברים בכל העולם- מעיתונים וכתבי עט ועד חדשות בפריים טיים. אנשים לא מאמינים עד כמה זה קרוב בטעם לממתק (שיערות סבתא) המוכר, עד אשר הם טועמים את זה.
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Robotics in Agriculture

Autonomous robots created at the University of Sydney can count fruit on trees, spray weeds, and even herd cows.

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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 20, 2016 10:08 AM
Until robots understand holism and acquire a metaphysical connection with Nature, agriculture will probably continue down a path where soon they'll design artificial bees for pollination, and chemical-exuding worms to breakdown the nutrients predigested by bacteria ... if that works, which I doubt.
John Edwards's curator insight, June 2, 2016 4:18 AM
I remember doing my GCSE French oral presentation on exactly this matter - "L'exode rural". Seems we're moving slower than I thought.
Nicole's curator insight, January 4, 5:10 PM

Is this the future of #Agriculture? #agrobots #ffce2017

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Food Waste

Producers, sellers, and consumers waste tons of food. John Oliver discusses the shocking amount of food we don’t eat.

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Jose Soto's curator insight, August 5, 2015 9:21 PM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 6, 2015 4:20 AM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

Sue Byrnes's curator insight, August 6, 2015 6:06 PM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

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How Orange Juice Is Made

The process of making orange juice on a humongous scale. The Americans drink so much of the stuff I'm surprised they still have any left for export.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 19, 2016 8:59 PM

If you image that your orange juice comes from farmers on ladders picking, then hand-squeezing oranges into orange juice, then you need to see just how mechanized this agribusiness is.  The machinery alone means that a small-scale farmer simply can't compete on the open market.  

 

Questions to Ponder: Why is OJ concentrate cheaper in the store if they have to work hard to extract the water out of the juice?  How would OJ concentrate be an example of either a bulk-gaining product or a bulk-reducing product?  

 

Tagsfood production, agriculture, foodeconomic, industry, economic, scale, agribusiness.

Antonio Andrade's curator insight, May 4, 2016 5:47 PM
Excelente conocer todo el proceso!

Character Minutes's curator insight, July 1, 2016 7:07 PM
Great resource for FACS teachers.

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From farm to factory: Where food comes from now

From farm to factory: Where food comes from now | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
If you’ve seen the words “artisanal” or “local” on a menu, thank Michael Pollan for that. The author, journalist, and food activist — named one of the 100 most influential people in the world by TIME magazine — gave a talk Thursday as part of the 10th-anniversary celebration of Arizona State University’s School of Sustainability.

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40 Ways The World Makes Awesome Hot Dogs

40 Ways The World Makes Awesome Hot Dogs | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"It’s not just a sausage in a bun; it’s a beautiful blank canvas. It’s a hot dog, which is a foodstuff eaten worldwide. Here are 40 distinctive varieties from around the globe — from iconic NYC 'dirty water dogs' to fully loaded South American street-cart dogs to Japanese octo-dogs. There is a tubesteak out there for every craving that ever was."


Via Seth Dixon, Adrian Bahan (MNPS)
Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's insight:

The 4th of July is the day of Coney Island's Hot Dog eating contest and the quintessential day to have a barbeque in the United States.  Some see the hot dog as a mere symbol of the uniformity of globalized culture in the 21st century that diffused out from the United States.  There is much more to be seen in the globalization of food.  Yes, the global goes to the whole world, but distinct places make this global cultural trait intensely local.  For example the hot dogs in Cincinnati are famous for being topped with chili and an obscene quantity of cheese, but in Costa Rica, I learned to love eating hot dogs deep fried, topped with cabbage, mayo and ketchup, just like the Ticos.  Food is but one example of this phenomena known as glocalization, where diffusion and divergence keep the world both global and local. 


Tags: food, culture, diffusion, globalization, consumption.

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Christopher L. Story's curator insight, July 26, 2015 10:24 PM

Seriously......Upton Sinclair eat your heart out. 

Jose Soto's curator insight, August 5, 2015 9:50 PM

The 4th of July is the day of Coney Island's Hot Dog eating contest and the quintessential day to have a barbeque in the United States.  Some see the hot dog as a mere symbol of the uniformity of globalized culture in the 21st century that diffused out from the United States.  There is much more to be seen in the globalization of food.  Yes, the global goes to the whole world, but distinct places make this global cultural trait intensely local.  For example the hot dogs in Cincinnati are famous for being topped with chili and an obscene quantity of cheese, but in Costa Rica, I learned to love eating hot dogs deep fried, topped with cabbage, mayo and ketchup, just like the Ticos.  Food is but one example of this phenomena known as glocalization, where diffusion and divergence keep the world both global and local. 

 

Tags: food, culture, diffusion, globalization, consumption.

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 14, 2016 8:10 PM

The 4th of July is the day of Coney Island's Hot Dog eating contest and the quintessential day to have a barbeque in the United States.  Some see the hot dog as a mere symbol of the uniformity of globalized culture in the 21st century that diffused out from the United States.  There is much more to be seen in the globalization of food.  Yes, the global goes to the whole world, but distinct places make this global cultural trait intensely local.  For example the hot dogs in Cincinnati are famous for being topped with chili and an obscene quantity of cheese, but in Costa Rica, I learned to love eating hot dogs deep fried, topped with cabbage, mayo and ketchup, just like the Ticos.  Food is but one example of this phenomena known as glocalization, where diffusion and divergence keep the world both global and local. 


Tags: food, culture, diffusion, globalization, consumption.

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How ‘Ugly’ Fruits and Vegetables Can Help Solve World Hunger

How ‘Ugly’ Fruits and Vegetables Can Help Solve World Hunger | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
About a third of the planet’s food goes to waste, often because of its looks. That’s enough to feed two billion people.

Via Seth Dixon
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Katerina Stojanovski's curator insight, March 10, 2016 6:10 AM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions.  In a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates, food waste needs to made more explicit. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

NADINE BURCHI SCORP's curator insight, March 10, 2016 1:24 PM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions.  In a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates, food waste needs to made more explicit. 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, March 11, 2016 9:29 PM
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26 Things You Might Not Know Were Named After Places

26 Things You Might Not Know Were Named After Places | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
From cheddar cheese to the tuxedo.

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Emma Boyle's curator insight, March 2, 2016 12:31 PM

Many ordinary objects are named for places where they were discovered, invented, or widely used. If you smell a dab of cologne on the man eating a Danish in the bungalow, the way you speak about that incident has a linguistic debt to a town in Germany, and the countries of Denmark and Bangladesh.  Many foods (especially wine and cheese) are named after places and 26 are highlighted in this article and here is a (semi-) exhaustive list of words derived from toponyms. 

 

Tags: food, language, toponyms.

MSTA's curator insight, March 3, 2016 3:35 PM

Many ordinary objects are named for places where they were discovered, invented, or widely used. If you smell a dab of cologne on the man eating a Danish in the bungalow, the way you speak about that incident has a linguistic debt to a town in Germany, and the countries of Denmark and Bangladesh.  Many foods (especially wine and cheese) are named after places and 26 are highlighted in this article and here is a (semi-) exhaustive list of words derived from toponyms. 

 

Tags: food, language, toponyms.

Jodi Esaili's curator insight, March 4, 2016 3:34 PM

Many ordinary objects are named for places where they were discovered, invented, or widely used. If you smell a dab of cologne on the man eating a Danish in the bungalow, the way you speak about that incident has a linguistic debt to a town in Germany, and the countries of Denmark and Bangladesh.  Many foods (especially wine and cheese) are named after places and 26 are highlighted in this article and here is a (semi-) exhaustive list of words derived from toponyms. 

 

Tags: food, language, toponyms.

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Food Processing

"Trying to break a whole lamb into steaks and roasts in just a little over three minutes."


Via Seth Dixon, Jodi Esaili
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 19, 2015 2:04 PM

Where does our food come from?  As the global population becomes more urban, the percentage of our population that is more disconnected from their food sources grows.  Additionally, our economic system works to actively separate consumers from the unseemly parts of the commodity chains, in hopes that our propensity to spend money on more goods won't decline.  All animals killed for human consumption go through some sort of butchering process before they become a meat product that we might recognize in the grocery store. 


Tags: foodeconomicfood production, agribusiness.

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Living in the Shadow of Industrial Farming

"The world eats cheap bacon at the expense of North Carolina's rural poor." 


Via Seth Dixon
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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, August 17, 2015 1:50 PM

Industrial farming, manure lagoons... do you know this type of farming?

Lilydale High School's curator insight, August 17, 2015 7:33 PM

Consequences of living near industrial sites - even if it is farming.

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, September 28, 2015 12:23 PM

This is pretty insane. I've seen other video's where it is a similar situation around chicken farms in the U.S. The people can't even go outside most of the time due to the smell, and it makes me wonder how much of the way we eat is truly devastating the planet. Beyond the smell, I can't help wonder what these types of farms would do the ground water beneath.

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Venezuela Is Starving

Venezuela Is Starving | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Once Latin America’s richest country, Venezuela can no longer feed its people, hobbled by the nationalization of farms as well as price and currency controls. The resulting hunger and malnutrition are an unfolding tragedy.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 5, 8:07 PM

Widespread famines are very rare in democracies and are much more prevalent in authoritarian regimes.  This is because food production is but a small part of a larger picture; the system of food production and distribution in Venezuela has been decimated by the nationalization of private farms.  Individual farmers can’t make a profit in the new political economy and consequently are going to stop producing for the market.  This vicious cycle is political in nature more so than in is agricultural. 

 

Tags: food, poverty, Venezuela, South America, economic, political, governance, agriculture, food production.

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The global food waste scandal

Western countries throw out nearly half of their food, not because it's inedible -- but because it doesn't look appealing. Tristram Stuart delves into the shocking data of wasted food, calling for a more responsible use of global resources.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 14, 2:57 PM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture.

Sabrina Ortiz's curator insight, March 5, 7:29 PM
My scoop it opinion piece was on global food waste. How globally food is thrown by the tons daily. Its audience is everyone and its purpose is to try to get people to open their eyes and waste less. America makes over four times the amount needed to feed its people. We are hurting the environment by making so much food that just go to waste. The purpose of this is to illustrate the huge issue we have with countries of people who don’t have food to begin with and here we are throwing away perfectly good food that could be use for these people or to feed pigs to make more meat. His exigence is all the food that could be use for other people or animals and its going to land fills daily. Its like a ticking time bomb hurting earth. His constraints are the laws set on food given to live stock in Europe and companies and the corporations that control the food. He urges people to use the amount of food they truly believe they will eat.
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Factory farming practices are under scrutiny again in N.C. after disastrous hurricane floods

Factory farming practices are under scrutiny again in N.C. after disastrous hurricane floods | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
As fecal waste and bacteria flow from hog lagoons into the water supply, North Carolina is revisiting a contentious battle between the pork industry, health experts and environmentalists.

 

In regions where hog farm density is high, there is an overall poor sanitary quality of surface waters. The presence of mass-scale swine and poultry lots and processing plants in a sandy floodplain – a region once dotted by small tobacco farms – has long posed a difficult dilemma for a state where swine and poultry represent billions of dollars a year for the economy. [Past] hurricane’s environmental impact in North Carolina were so severe in part because of the large number of hog lagoon breaches. Following Hurricane Matthew, the department has counted 10 to 12 lagoons that were inundated, with floodwaters topping the berms and spreading diluted waste.

 

Tags: food, agriculture, agribusiness, unit 5 agriculture, agricultural environment, environment, environment modify, pollution. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Why the US government wants Americans to eat more cheese

Why the US government wants Americans to eat more cheese | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The USDA said today that it will buy $20 million worth of cheese to donate to food banks and pantries in an effort to help America's struggling dairy producers.

Via Seth Dixon, Christopher L. Story
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 30, 2016 3:09 PM

Do politics, economics, and government policies help to shape agriculture patterns?  Absolutely.  This is an interesting, current example that shows how Chinese and Russian policies are impacting American dairy producers, and how the U.S. government is stepping in. 

 

Questions to Ponder:  Should the U.S. government protect businesses that are in dire straits?  What would happen if the government did not offer agricultural subsidies/bailouts?  What will happen (or not happen) because of these subsidies/bailouts?  Any way you slice it, 11 million tons is a lot of cheddar.     

 

Tags: agriculture, food production, economicfood, agribusiness,

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Edible Cutlery

"India is one of the world's largest consumers of disposable plastic cutlery, which has the makings of a huge health and environmental crisis written all over it."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 3, 2016 9:15 AM

Plastics clog our landfills and single-use plastic consumption is one of the most wasteful elements of our consumer-based, disposable society.  This product is a reaction against the waste of disposable cutlery, but it is also an intriguing developmental strategy (see company kickstarter page or website). 

 

Tags: developmentfood, gender, agricultureconsumption, South Asia, pollution

Rebecca Geevarghese's curator insight, May 8, 2016 6:27 AM
How innovative!! Will definitely being showing this to my Geography students. 
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The Geography of Hunger and Food Insecurity

Why are some communities more vulnerable to hunger and famine? There are many reasons, which together add up to food insecurity, the world's no.1 health risk...

 

Excellent summary of the geographic factors that lead to food insecurity and hunger and the main ways NGO's are trying to combat the issues.   This is an incredibly complex problem that, at it's heart, is a geographic issue that can challenge student to synthesize information and make the connections between topics.  


Via Seth Dixon, Michael Miller
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Lisa Fonseca's comment, December 5, 2011 1:02 AM
This is a incredible clip that does challenge students to synthesize information and make the connections between topics, but it can also help students to realize making a difference at a early age is important. I learned an abundance of facts just from watching, it was informative and intriguing. As I was watching the video I was thinking of ways it can be incorporated into the classroom. This video could get students to learn about the world's number one health risk. Incorporating it into the classroom by holding a food drive, or having a school wide fundraiser to donate to the British Red Cross is also another way to help. Getting our future minds informed and helping the community will make an impact in the future.
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The sinister, secret history of a food that everybody loves

The sinister, secret history of a food that everybody loves | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The ancient history of the potato could change the story of civilization

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This is how our favorite foods look in their natural habitats

This is how our favorite foods look in their natural habitats | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
We know how to harvest potatoes and apples. There are other fruits and vegetables, however, which have natural habitats we can barely imagine. We see these items in the grocery store every day, but often we have no idea how they got there.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 28, 2016 1:17 PM

This set of teaching images hammers home how natural items become commodities that are removed from their original context.  The fact that these foods are somewhat difficult to recognize shows just how most consumers have been removed from the full geographies of their food.  

 

Tagsfood production, images, agriculture, foodeconomic.

Lilydale High School's curator insight, April 24, 2016 4:39 AM
Food - naturally.
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PBS Food: Potatoes

PBS Food: Potatoes | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Follow America's favorite vegetable from field to factory — to see how potatoes grow and how they're turned into chips."


Via Seth Dixon
Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's insight:

This 5 minute video is a good introduction to the potato, it's hearth, diffusion, population impacts, nutritional profile and industrial production.  The geography of food goes far beyond the kitchen and there are more episodes in the "How Does it Grow?" series to show that.   


Tags: food, economic, food production, agribusiness, industry, video, agriculture.

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Ari Galant's curator insight, August 25, 2016 9:53 PM
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Alex Smiga's curator insight, August 30, 2016 2:56 PM
papa.
Sophie Wilson's curator insight, August 31, 2016 10:33 AM
This video shows the process of potatoes moving from farm to factory in America and how they are turned into chips. It shows how the potatoes are planted, grown and turned into chips. 
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26 Things You Might Not Know Were Named After Places

26 Things You Might Not Know Were Named After Places | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
From cheddar cheese to the tuxedo.

Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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Emma Boyle's curator insight, March 2, 2016 12:31 PM

Many ordinary objects are named for places where they were discovered, invented, or widely used. If you smell a dab of cologne on the man eating a Danish in the bungalow, the way you speak about that incident has a linguistic debt to a town in Germany, and the countries of Denmark and Bangladesh.  Many foods (especially wine and cheese) are named after places and 26 are highlighted in this article and here is a (semi-) exhaustive list of words derived from toponyms. 

 

Tags: food, language, toponyms.

MSTA's curator insight, March 3, 2016 3:35 PM

Many ordinary objects are named for places where they were discovered, invented, or widely used. If you smell a dab of cologne on the man eating a Danish in the bungalow, the way you speak about that incident has a linguistic debt to a town in Germany, and the countries of Denmark and Bangladesh.  Many foods (especially wine and cheese) are named after places and 26 are highlighted in this article and here is a (semi-) exhaustive list of words derived from toponyms. 

 

Tags: food, language, toponyms.

Jodi Esaili's curator insight, March 4, 2016 3:34 PM

Many ordinary objects are named for places where they were discovered, invented, or widely used. If you smell a dab of cologne on the man eating a Danish in the bungalow, the way you speak about that incident has a linguistic debt to a town in Germany, and the countries of Denmark and Bangladesh.  Many foods (especially wine and cheese) are named after places and 26 are highlighted in this article and here is a (semi-) exhaustive list of words derived from toponyms. 

 

Tags: food, language, toponyms.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
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Why Shanghai's first American Chinese restaurant is taking off

Why Shanghai's first American Chinese restaurant is taking off | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The BBC's Celia Hatton finds out why one restaurant in Shanghai is serving up American-style Chinese food

Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 24, 2015 2:40 PM

This article covers the same topic as this NPR podcast, the success of an American-style Chinese restaurant in China.  Some joked that it was akin to selling snow to Eskimos, but there is a local appetite among the youth that want to experiment with the 'foreign,' but also with American ex-pats that crave a taste of home. This is just one more delicious example of how globalization impacts cultural products and how globalization flows in many unexpected directions.  For more, see this TED talk on the search for the origins of General Tso's chicken, and this podcast of the historical geographies of the fortune cookie.    

 

Tags: foodglobalization, culture, China, East Asia, podcast.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from UNIT I APHuG
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The Food Capitals of Instagram

The Food Capitals of Instagram | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Explore the popularity of some of the world’s favourite foods on Instagram. Discover Instagram’s capital of curry, which cities are big on burgers, and where pulled pork is most prolific.

Via Seth Dixon, Adrian Bahan (MNPS)
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 12, 2015 8:41 PM

I was talking to a good friend about the geographic distribution of poutine after watching the silliest YouTube video. (Montreal is famous for it's poutine, but is in equally widespread throughout Quebec?  Canada?  Is there a core/domain/sphere areas to be mapped? These are the questions that plague geographers.).  True, this map has it's limitations; Instagram hashtag data isn't normalized so the biggest cities tend to pop out more easily, access/use of Instagram isn't uniform, etc.  Still, what a great map to show some geographic applications of social media data.  This sort of map also nicely shows the spatial concepts of region, diffusion, concentration and distribution.  


Tags: visualizationsocial media, mapping, culturediffusion, popular culture, regions, food.

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