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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Donut Holes in Law of the Sea

Donut Holes in Law of the Sea | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Sovereignty over land defines nation states since 1648. In contrast, sovereign right over the sea was formalised only in 1982. While land borders are well-known, sea borders escape the limelight."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 8, 9:28 PM

These maritime borders mark the economic area is defined by its Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), a 200-nautical mile-wide (370 km) strip of sea along the country’s national coast line.  This regulation, which was installed by the ‘UN Convention on the Law of the Sea’ in 1982, grants a state special rights to exploit natural (such as oil) and marine (for instance fish) resources, including scientific research and energy production (wind-parks, for example).  This interactive map of the EEZs also shows the 'donut holes,' or the seas that are no state can claim that no state can claim.  Given the number of conflicts that are occurring--especially in East Asia--this map becomes a very valuable online resource for teaching political geography. 


Questions to ponder: how does this series of buffer zones around the Earth's land masses impact politics, the environment and local economies?  Where might the EEZs be more important to the success of a country/territory than other regions? 


Tagseconomic, environment, political, resources, water, sovereignty, coastal, environment depend, territoriality, states, conflict, unit 4 political.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 29, 5:48 PM

Option topic Marine  Environments and management

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 6:52 PM

APHG-U4

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Pink Lakes

Pink Lakes | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Photo by Jean Paul Ferrero/Ardea/Caters News (via Exposing the Truth   Lake Hillier is a pink-coloured lake on Middle Island in Western Australia. Middle island is the largest of the islands a...

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 6:01 PM

This lake is so majestic and beautiful but how does it have this pink color? Well it gets the pink color from the sand it is surrounded by and is one of the largest Middle islands in Australia. 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 8:13 PM

This beautiful lake is a phenomenon the reason for its color is still unknown but it makes a very memorable lake!

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 10:44 AM

The cause of the pink lake is still a mystery. Scientists believe the pink could be due to lack of nutrients or other substances. I think this is truly remarkable! Its beautiful to say the least. 

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What Could Disappear?

What Could Disappear? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Coastal and low-lying areas that would be permanently flooded in three levels of higher seas.

 

This interactive feature is designed to answer a simple, yet profound set of questions.  What areas (in over 20 cities around the U.S.) would be under water if the ocean levels rose 5 feet?  12 feet?  25 feet?  The following set of maps show "coastal and low-lying areas that would be permanently flooded without engineered protection." 


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Mary Rack's comment, November 26, 2012 8:03 AM
especially good!
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12 of the Most Beautiful Bays in the World

This is a great set of images that show coastal processes for a geomorphology or physical geography class.  Pictured above is Palm Bay, Australia, which also happens to show fluvial processes as well.  


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Top 10 Beaches

Top 10 Beaches | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Top 10 Beaches from National Geographic...

 

I'd glady go to any of these gorgeous spots to appreciate the geographic marvels.  If you could only go to one travel destination (and had an unlimited budget), where would you choose to go?  How come?


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Why the Global Warming Skeptics Are Wrong

Why the Global Warming Skeptics Are Wrong | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The threat of climate change is an increasingly important environmental issue for the globe. Because the economic questions involved have received relatively little attention, I have been writing a nontechnical book for people who would like to see how market-based approaches could be used to formulate policy on climate change. When I showed an early draft to colleagues, their response was that I had left out the arguments of skeptics about climate change, and I accordingly addressed this at length." 

 

This is an excellent summary of the scientific basis for anthropogenic climate change as a scientific reality.  It addresses the concerns of climate change skeptics, point by point and notes flaws in the logic, data or reasoning.   For an article about the possibility of global warming impacting coastal areas of the U.S., see: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/14/science/earth/study-rising-sea-levels-a-risk-to-coastal-states.html


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The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising

The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Scientists have issued a new warning to the world’s coastal megacities that the threat from subsiding land is a more immediate problem than rising sea levels caused by global warming.

 

A new paper from the Deltares Research Institute in the Netherlands published in April identified regions of the globe where the ground level is falling 10 times faster than water levels are rising - with human activity often to blame.

In Jakarta, Indonesia’s largest city, the population has grown from around half a million in the 1930s to just under 10 million today, with heavily populated areas dropping by as much as six and a half feet as groundwater is pumped up from the Earth to drink.

The same practice led to Tokyo’s ground level falling by two meters before new restrictions were introduced, and in Venice, this sort of extraction has only compounded the effects of natural subsidence caused by long-term geological processes.

 

Tags: coastal, climate change, urban, megacities, water, environment, urban ecology.


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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 2, 12:32 AM

Perception!

Matt Evan Dobbie's curator insight, August 2, 6:55 PM

Huge problem when combined with sea level rise

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 6:53 PM

APHG-U7

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Korea and the Yellow Sea

Korea and the Yellow Sea | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
While city lights at night serve as a good proxy for population density, North Korea provides a dark exception.

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Ju Hui Judy Han's curator insight, January 7, 2013 12:22 AM

This cliché image of "North Korea in the dark" reinforces preconceived ideas about the "totalitarian" state and how terrible life must be without electricity. Well, one aspect of this political geography is the effect of US-backed sanctions against North Korea and the severe ecological and energy crisis under which it has struggled for the last two decades. Just as electricity is not simply a "natural" resource, neither is energe consumption nor shortage. 

Ju Hui Judy Han's comment, January 7, 2013 12:26 AM
It also regurgitates troubling metaphors of darkness as backwardness.
Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, January 8, 2013 1:14 PM

This image is appears to be a regional inset of the classic Earth at Night composite image however this nighttime remote sensing image was taken from Sept. 2012.  The Earth at Night image is typically used in classrooms to discuss what this actually means for human geography (Population density?  Development? Consumption? Where? How come?).  However, this particular portion of the global image focused on the Korean Peninsula highlights two other specific issues:

the impact of a totalitarian state can actually be seen from space as South Korea has a per captia income level 17 times higher than that of North Korea.  the Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs) can be seen in the Yellow Sea as fishing vessels form a line approximately 200 nautical miles off the coast of South Korea.     


Tags:  economic, political, resources, water, sovereignty, coastal, territoriality, states, unit 4 political, remote sensing.

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Sea Level Rise Poses Specific Threat To East Coast Cities

Sea Level Rise Poses Specific Threat To East Coast Cities | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Brace yourselves, East Coasters....

 

Thinking spatially, it's important to remember that not all places will be impacted equally.  Even among coasts, not all spots would receive equal sea level rises when the ocean's systems are dynamic.


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Collin Lewis's comment, August 12, 2012 3:14 PM
I have been to North Carolina and many of the other places mentioned in this article and have seen the damages of the water levels rising. One example of the water rising is a road in North Carolina going to Cape Hatteras that is now completely submerged underwater. There is now a make-shift bridge that runs over the underwater road.
Zach Trafton's comment, August 13, 2012 4:14 PM
I knew that the sea level was rising but I didn't know it was happening so quickly. I think that people living in the hot spot are should take this seriously. When I go to the beach there use to be a lot more beach between the road and ocean. but because of the rising sea level, the land between is becoming shorter and shorter.
Emily Franson's comment, September 2, 2012 3:19 PM
The sea level is rising rapidly and I had no idea how serious it is and how much of an impact it's taking on the world. People living in the hot spot need to realize how serious of a problem this can turn into and that the sea level will have a big effect on the land as time goes by.
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Images of Earth From Above

Images of Earth From Above | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Yesterday was Earth Day, a time set aside to increase awareness of the natural environment and the impact of our collective actions...

 

This is a gorgeous set of 39 images that are all view the Earth and captures images for above.  These aerial photography and remote sensing images focus of a wide range of topics such as the cultural landscape, the environment, earth science, cultural ecology and urban systems.   The photo above is of Mont-Saint-Michel, a tourist attraction and UNESCO world heritage site in northwestern France that is the world's premier example of the tombolo landform.


Via M. Roman, Seth Dixon
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Paige T's comment, August 28, 2012 2:55 PM
Its interesting how patterns in this world repeat themselves, whether in nature or man-made objects. The pictures of the shanty town in Venezuela and the floating ice sheets in Germany are similar in their layers, overlapping, and repetitiveness.
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Erosion: The White Cliffs of Dover

Erosion: The White Cliffs of Dover | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Thousands of tons of chalk from the famous White Cliffs of Dover have collapsed into the sea following a huge rockfall.

 

An excellent example of erosion and the processes that have shaped an iconic landscape.  The accompanying article has numerous pictures from a variety of angles that truly tell the story.   


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Gallery of Tombolos

Gallery of Tombolos | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Pictures of these rare sandbars that extend to a nearshore island.

 

Coastal physical geography produces beautiful landforms...these tombolos (some famous like Mont St. Michel) provide visual examples of numerous geomorphological processes. 


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