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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising

The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Scientists have issued a new warning to the world’s coastal megacities that the threat from subsiding land is a more immediate problem than rising sea levels caused by global warming.

 

A new paper from the Deltares Research Institute in the Netherlands published in April identified regions of the globe where the ground level is falling 10 times faster than water levels are rising - with human activity often to blame.

In Jakarta, Indonesia’s largest city, the population has grown from around half a million in the 1930s to just under 10 million today, with heavily populated areas dropping by as much as six and a half feet as groundwater is pumped up from the Earth to drink.

The same practice led to Tokyo’s ground level falling by two meters before new restrictions were introduced, and in Venice, this sort of extraction has only compounded the effects of natural subsidence caused by long-term geological processes.

 

Tags: coastal, climate change, urban, megacities, water, environment, urban ecology.


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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 1, 9:32 PM

Perception!

Matt Evan Dobbie's curator insight, August 2, 3:55 PM

Huge problem when combined with sea level rise

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 3:53 PM

APHG-U7

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Rising Seas: If All The Ice Melted

Rising Seas: If All The Ice Melted | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Explore the world’s new coastlines if sea level rises 216 feet.

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Brian Hammerstix's curator insight, November 23, 2013 4:29 PM

#stopburningfossilfuels or #goodbyeflorida

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 10:15 AM

Aside from the mass devastation i think it would be pretty cool of all the ice melted. As the interactive map shows there would be in inland sea in australia which i can turn into the AUs great lakes. Also imagine the possiblility of being able to take a vacation to antartica and not having to dress for absurdly negative tempatures, all the undiscovered land and preservated fossils. It would be a interestling link to the past that only in the future we could experience.

Mrs. K's curator insight, August 27, 4:20 AM

Would Belgium be covered in water if all the ice melted?

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xkcd: Ice Sheets

xkcd: Ice Sheets | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Climate Change Infographic

Climate Change Infographic | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Ignacio Conejo Moreno's curator insight, March 3, 2013 3:52 AM

Chungo futuro se nos presenta, si no cambiamos nuestros hábitos!

Emily Ross Cook's curator insight, March 4, 2013 5:44 AM

Humans must change their ways - what are some real life recommendations for changing?

mrjacquot's curator insight, March 6, 2013 5:48 PM

For all the doubters...

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Boundary conditions

Boundary conditions | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
PULL a spring, let it go, and it will snap back into shape. Pull it further and yet further and it will go on springing back until, quite suddenly, it won't....

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Joel Barker's curator insight, February 10, 2013 8:56 AM

A useful discussion on limits of the planet

Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 11, 2013 5:23 AM

This is an interesting article discussing the limits that the Earth's physical systems have and the importance not exceeding any tipping point that could destabilize the planet if we "overstrech the springs."

Angus Henderson's curator insight, February 11, 2013 8:49 AM

An interesting counter-balance to the work of the Planetary Boundaries group. 

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Dramatic Greenland Ice Melt

Scientists capture dramatic footage of Arctic glaciers melting in hours Scientists have captured dramatic footage of massive lakes in the Arctic melting away...

 

An amazingly extreme place that is far removed from inhabited regions of our planet, but still heavily impacted by people nonetheless.  


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Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 7:10 PM
It shows us how humanity impacts the planet wherever we are
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Sea Level Rise Poses Specific Threat To East Coast Cities

Sea Level Rise Poses Specific Threat To East Coast Cities | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Brace yourselves, East Coasters....

 

Thinking spatially, it's important to remember that not all places will be impacted equally.  Even among coasts, not all spots would receive equal sea level rises when the ocean's systems are dynamic.


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Collin Lewis's comment, August 12, 2012 12:14 PM
I have been to North Carolina and many of the other places mentioned in this article and have seen the damages of the water levels rising. One example of the water rising is a road in North Carolina going to Cape Hatteras that is now completely submerged underwater. There is now a make-shift bridge that runs over the underwater road.
Zach Trafton's comment, August 13, 2012 1:14 PM
I knew that the sea level was rising but I didn't know it was happening so quickly. I think that people living in the hot spot are should take this seriously. When I go to the beach there use to be a lot more beach between the road and ocean. but because of the rising sea level, the land between is becoming shorter and shorter.
Emily Franson's comment, September 2, 2012 12:19 PM
The sea level is rising rapidly and I had no idea how serious it is and how much of an impact it's taking on the world. People living in the hot spot need to realize how serious of a problem this can turn into and that the sea level will have a big effect on the land as time goes by.
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Kiribati and Climate Change

Kiribati and Climate Change | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Fearing that climate change could wipe out their Pacific archipelago, the leaders of Kiribati are considering an unusual backup plan: moving the population to Fiji.

 

How urgent is the issue of climate change?  That question is not only geographic in content, but the response might also be somewhat contingent on geography as well.  If your country literally has no higher ground to retreat to, the thought of even minimal sea level change would be totally devastating. 


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Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 10:23 AM

This is more than immigration, this plan is moving an entire country within another! Climate change doesn't effect the world equally in the same way that different countries are nowhere near equal. In a place as small as Kiribati, the entire place could be wiped out. The population of the nation is around 100,000 for reference.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 26, 11:42 AM

The leaders from Kiribati are considering moving some of their population to Fiji. They fear climate change could destroy their islands and force their population to leave. They want to purchase 6,000 acres from Fiji, which should be enough land for Kiribati's 103,000 people. The people hope they will not have to move to Fiji, but buying this land is a good backup plan incase their islands are a victim to climate change.   

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Deep Freeze Spreads Across Europe

Deep Freeze Spreads Across Europe | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The frigid weather that plagued Eastern Europe much of last week spread westward over the weekend, grounding flights, snarling traffic, and causing hundreds of deaths...

 

This picture alone is a fantastic teaching resource.  I can see a great lesson structured around analyzing the physical and human geographic context within these landscapes (there are 39 additional images in the gallery).  


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sdion's comment, February 9, 2012 3:01 PM
these images are really striking, especially the landscapes with the icy/snowy architecture, i heard in another class that Japan recently got hit with about ten feet of snow, makes me feel fortunate weve only gotten six inches so far this winter
Charles Matley's comment, February 10, 2012 6:06 PM
This is maddening. Global Warming is certainly not a myth, some of these places have never seen snow like this.
Nick Flanagan's curator insight, December 12, 2012 6:32 PM

It's crazy how the cold effected this region.  I mean some of these pictures didnt een look they were real, they looked like something you would see on a postcard.  I think it would be cool at first to be there and see these images first hand, but with how cold it looks there i would probably be over it in about 10 minutes. 

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Places to See Before They Disappear

Places to See Before They Disappear | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
From Andalusia to Olympia, here are ten gorgeous places we might not have for much longer.

 

Some ecosystems are incredibly resilient in the face of climate change, while others are more vulnerable.  This slideshow looks at some of the most gorgeous, yet susceptible places on Earth. 


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, October 17, 2011 8:13 PM
If these are some of the most incredible places on Earth why aren't we encouraging people or a way to help save these places. We have seen so many places get destroyed from natural disasters why aren't we trying to save these places. Also many of those places have a lot of tourism therefore it is essential we save them. Other places few but some I feel not many people would be familiar with. Why not inform people of what is going on. Finding way to help save these beautiful places.
Grammie's comment, October 20, 2011 9:20 PM
Ihave traveled to the most interesting and unusual places that we are aware of, what we need are leaders and people that are aware of these places that need saving, please help
Seth Dixon's comment, October 21, 2011 6:00 PM
I believe the "stewardship" metaphor for human environmental relations is an apt one, especially since misuse of the physical environment could most certainly place many decisions as making our societies as "bad stewards."
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Watch the Earth Warm Since 1880

Watch the Earth Warm Since 1880 | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"It can be difficult to conceive of the long process that's led the world to having its nine hottest years on record all after 2000. That's why it's nice that NASA has generated this nifty animation, which shows temperature abnormalities for every month of the past 13 decades. Watch reddish warm zones spread over the globe as time rolls past, like a virulent fever covering the body of a sick host."

 


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Maldives

Maldives | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 11, 1:19 AM

The Maldives are an extremely interesting case of physical geography. They are made of coral and sands which the oceans have deposited on the coral skeleton of the islands. The ringed shape of the islands suggests there was once something in the center of the them which either receded into the ocean or eroded away leaving only the hardened coral rings behind.

 

Economically, the fairly unique nature of these tropical islands makes them an excellent tourist destination and Maldives has a significant tourist industry. Unfortunately, the unique physical geography of the islands makes them extremely vulnerable to tsunami and rising sea levels. If global warming raises the ocean levels a few feet, the majority of the islands will be flooded permanently.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 3:51 PM

Although they are a country that relies on tourism for their economy, they still limit the number of tourists in respect for the Muslim population of the islands. Unfortunately, geology of the islands puts them in danger of rising sea levels without much of a solution for protection.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 5:48 PM

Boy would I love to visit the Maldives. What an interesting and beautiful island it is.

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6 Ways Climate Change Will Affect You

6 Ways Climate Change Will Affect You | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
From the food we eat to the energy, transportation, and water we all need, a warmer world will bring big changes for everyone.

 

B Sinica: This article touches every aspect of geography from culture to climate [considering] how the growing population plays the biggest role in determining the future of life on Earth.  People need to recognize the problems and potential future issues with global warming and the rapidly changing environment.  Though not many issues can be prevented or even solved, the least we can do is try to lessen the severity of devastation and prolong the current conditions as much as possible before the world becomes too extreme to manage.


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Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 7:22 PM
It is kind of a scary thought that global warming could greatly disrupt the way we live. Everyone is affected by it especially businesses like farms. The production of crops declines because of the excessive heat. Changing climate affect the length of each season which hurts the process of growing and harvesting crops. There would also be a change in the production, storage and transportation. It will cost more money to properly manage these businesses. This change will not only affect companies and how we handle our food but also our way of life and health. We would all have to adapt to such drastic changes in the environment which may be a struggle for some. Health wise, if it is too hot and people are not well adapted then it could lead to hospitalization and increased health risks. I don’t think there is much we can do to lessen the severity because it is a natural cycle of earth. I do think we may have sped up the process a little bit, for example car exhaustion and greenhouse gasses. But we are so dependent on such technology we can’t just make it disappear.
Dillon Cartwright's comment, May 3, 2013 1:04 PM
It's crazy that something like a little climate change can change the affect the entire world. Not just in one way either, it affects the world in many ways, like the 6 mentioned above. I don't think people realize the frailty of the environment they live in. Something as small as someones car exhaust becomes kind of a big deal when there are hundreds of millions of cars in the world.
In addition to that, I think it's great that life expectancy has gone up with cures to diseases and advances in modern medicine. It's a good thing that people are living longer lives, but it's a problem when these people aren't environmentally conscious. If there is going to be a consistent increase in population, there should also be an increase in environmental awareness so everyone can work together in slowing down this destructive process.
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 10:03 AM

Climate change is going to affect how we live in the future. It will cause lack of food, energy sources, health risks, climate changes, drought etc. It is because of our growing population and the amount of people the world has to take care of for all of us to survive. We are also using too many of its resources too quickly. What could we do now to try to slow down the process of it happening? 

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Why Vikings Abandoned Colony in Greenland

Why Vikings Abandoned Colony in Greenland | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
For years, researchers have puzzled over why Viking descendents abandoned Greenland in the late 15th century.

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James Good's comment, April 19, 2013 3:33 PM
It would make sense that the Vikings abandoned Greenland because they felt isolated from their mother country. There must have been a strong Scandanavian folk culture that the people of Greenland valued enough to make such a drastic movement. It is very likely that the people of Greenland cherished their home land and its culture. This culture was probably more exciting to them then the dismal life in the far north.

Once the demand for walrus tusks and seal skins decreased, there was really no need for the Vikings to stay in Greenland anyways. If they did not want to become farmers and take advantage of the potential farming land that Greenland had to offer, then there would be no benefit to staying there anyway.
Conor McCloskey's comment, April 30, 2013 7:25 AM
Humans have been exploring our planet for thousands of years. Settlements are established, and deemed successful or unsuccessful. The successful ones are still around today, however the unsuccessful one’s usually fall to the wayside and are forgotten. Many things can make a colony of human exploration unsuccessful, much like Viking colonies in Greenland. These colonies were abandoned and archeologists have search for the reasons why. Questions of the fertility of the land and available animals to hunt have been reasons that archeologists use to explain the colonial abandonment.
The push and pull factors of ancient Viking life are apparent through their migratory patterns. There are many possible reasons for the Vikings to have left this colony though archeologists are struggling to find just one. Food source seems to be a major reason why other colonies were abandoned, though seal meat does not seem to be at a shortage in this area. Ancient reason of migrating is similar to modern ones, however they are also very different. Globalization has changed the way humans live, the interconnectedness of the world has made living in places that could support life in ancient times possible.
Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 2:11 PM
Of course they left, who would want to be basically stranded on Greenland away from any other civilization? Not me for sure. Plus, the lack of supplied they were receiving and tools it would have been near impossible to live and thrive in Greenland. They were also losing their identity; they were thinking of themselves more as farmers and ranchers rather than fishermen and hunters, their original identity as Scandinavians. Nonetheless it was imperative that they leave and head home because the colony in Greenland surely would have run dry and died out. If not for the overkilling of seals for food or the bone-chilling winters, I might theorize that they might stay in Greenland however that is not how history unfolded and it doesn’t surprise me that they left. Like James said, once their trade had virtually ceased, the outpost in Greenland was useless because they could be just living back home where you weren’t in extreme weather conditions and living off of seal meat.
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Drought Fuels Water War Between Texas and New Mexico

Drought Fuels Water War Between Texas and New Mexico | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
As climate change alters rainfall patterns and river flows, tensions are bound to rise between states and countries that share rivers that cross their borders. In the Rio Grande Basin of the American Southwest, that future inevitability has arrived.

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Heather Ramsey's curator insight, February 11, 2013 11:46 AM

In our class we take an in-depth look at Colorado River issues, but it

Al Picozzi's comment, July 13, 2013 4:34 PM
Even in the US water supply can still be an issue.
Kate Makin's curator insight, October 10, 2013 4:23 AM

Social Impact

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Satellites Reveal Sudden Greenland Ice Melt

Satellites Reveal Sudden Greenland Ice Melt | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
NASA researchers are expressing concern about something they've never seen before: the melting of ice across nearly the entire surface of Greenland earlier this month.

 

Climate changes are afoot in the Arctic and the Greenland ice sheet.  For more on the Arctic. In related news, Texas and Louisiana have introduced education standards that require educators to teach climate change denial as a valid scientific position. South Dakota and Utah passed resolutions denying climate change. Tennessee and Oklahoma also have introduced legislation to give climate change skeptics a place in the classroom.


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Sarah Curtis's comment, September 3, 2012 12:33 PM
I didn't know how bad global warming was until I read this article and I don't think many people realize it either. We need to start changing our ways if we want to live in a safe and healthy environment. I think more people need to see images and read articles like this so they have a better knowledge on how little time we have.
Morgan Halsey's comment, September 10, 2012 8:30 PM
Some people still don't believe in global warming, but now with new technology, there is great evidence. New technology has allowed us to explore our world in ways that we have not been able to before. We are now able see things about our world and fix problems before they become worse.
Michael Grant's comment, September 12, 2012 1:12 PM
I am surprised about how the polar ice caps are melting and that global warming is very real, but on the other hand it's just part of the Earth maturing
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Why the Global Warming Skeptics Are Wrong

Why the Global Warming Skeptics Are Wrong | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The threat of climate change is an increasingly important environmental issue for the globe. Because the economic questions involved have received relatively little attention, I have been writing a nontechnical book for people who would like to see how market-based approaches could be used to formulate policy on climate change. When I showed an early draft to colleagues, their response was that I had left out the arguments of skeptics about climate change, and I accordingly addressed this at length." 

 

This is an excellent summary of the scientific basis for anthropogenic climate change as a scientific reality.  It addresses the concerns of climate change skeptics, point by point and notes flaws in the logic, data or reasoning.   For an article about the possibility of global warming impacting coastal areas of the U.S., see: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/14/science/earth/study-rising-sea-levels-a-risk-to-coastal-states.html


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Visualizing the Global Carbon Footprint

Visualizing the Global Carbon Footprint | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

One of the key things I reinforce in conversations about globalization is that the advantages are unevenly distributed and the negative externalities to the system are also unevenly distributed.  This clever infographic highlights both rather effectively. 


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Dale Fraza's comment, February 27, 2012 12:26 PM
Really surprised at a couple things:
1. Brazil's relative tinyness in comparison with the U.S. Guess I've always just heard bad things about Brazil in regards to deforestation and the like.
2. Just how much a formerly agricultural nation (China) has exploded. Something really needs to be done about the environmental havoc they are wreaking (not to be a total ethnocentrist or anything).
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Watch 131 Years of Global Warming in 26 Seconds

Watch 131 Years of Global Warming in 26 Seconds | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
An amazing 26-second video depicting how temperatures around the globe have warmed since 1880.

This quick visualization is a excellent summary of the data of anthropogenic climate change.


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:09 PM

I wonder why the climate is changing so much it seems to be devastating. It can probably affect a lot of people because many people depend on a certain type of weather to grow food or do anything else that involves the weather like going for a swim in a pool or lake. The weather is something that many people need and depend on. Many people want the heat because they cant be in a cold area or vise versa. 

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 12, 2013 4:13 PM

A great visual dispay showing how tempetures have flucuated over the past 130 years and the futer implications of climate change today. Thoughout the video it shows how the tempeture is chaging (rising and falling) all acorss the board. However you cleary see at the end that tempeture stop flucuating and only contiues to rise. While over all it is only a 1 or 2 dagree differnce, its clear that if we go 80 years with a stable tempture and then it starts to only get warmer that weve got a climate change problam on our hands.