AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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220 years of US population changes in one map

Every 10 years, the Census Bureau calculates the exact center of the US population. Here's what that statistic shows about our history.

Via Seth Dixon, Jodi Esaili
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 1:46 PM

Every 10 years the centroid (the center of U.S. population) is calculated using the latest census data.  As the video above shows, the centroid has continued moved west throughout history, but in the last 60 years has moved to the south and west.  The recent shift to the south coincides with the mass availability of air conditioning (among other factors) which opened up the Sun Belt.  In this article in Orion Magazine, Jeremy Miller discusses the historical shifts in the spatial patterns of the U.S. population and the history of the centroid.  you can listen to the podcast version of the article or a shorter podcast by NPR

 

Questions to Ponder:  Would the centroids of other countries be as mobile or predictable?  Why or why not?  What does the centroid tell us?

 

Tags: statistics, census, mappingmigration, populationhistoricalUSA.

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Damage from cancelled Canadian census as bad as feared

Damage from cancelled Canadian census as bad as feared | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The cancellation of the mandatory long-form census has damaged research in key areas, from how immigrants are doing in the labour market to how the middle class is faring, while making it more difficult for cities to ensure taxpayer dollars are being spent wisely, planners and researchers say.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 2, 2015 11:25 PM

Canada got rid of the mandatory census, and is discovering it can no longer know much about itself. 


Tag: Canada, populationcensus.

Emma Conde's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:41 PM

Unit 1 Geography: Its nature and Perspectives

This article is about how Canada switched its census from being mandatory to voluntary, and how this has had many negative effects. By not having a mandatory census, Canada has saved the national government money, but in truth has really lost a lot. It is much harder to have accurate demographics for city planning, research purposes, and business marketing. Researchers are unable to tell the distribution of racial equality in neighborhoods, the demographics of neighborhoods, and are completley unable to track immagration. There is a voluntary census in place, but this produces much lower quality results, and is expensive to obtain this data.

 

This relates to the theme of how information such as census data is used, and through this article you are able to tell how important something like the census is to providing data for so many different oraganizations/people. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 17, 2015 8:45 AM

As much as Americans hate the Census, this article proves that it is an important governmental instrument. There are many in this nation that would probably desire a similar proposal. They should read this article before ever speaking on the subject again. A Census is nessacary  to tell us about ourselves. How can a government formulate a public policy, if it does not know who lives within its borders?

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Local Population Pyramids

Local Population Pyramids | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Mrs. Karnowski's curator insight, August 27, 2014 7:13 AM

1G Theme 2: 6 Billion people and me

CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 2014 8:27 PM

Useful for explaining population pyramids.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 16, 2014 12:08 PM

Unit 2

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Hispanic Population in the USA

Hispanic Population in the USA | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
This data visualization from the U.S. Census Bureau shows distribution of Hispanic or Latino population by specific origin. http://go.usa.gov/D7VH

Via Seth Dixon
Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's insight:

1. What geographic factors account for the differences in settlement patterns of those of Puerto Rican origin and those of Mexican origin? 













2.How do these patterns shape the cultural patterns in the United States and affect particular places?


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Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, October 21, 2014 6:48 PM

Very interesting to see how both major countries like Mexico Puerto Rico differ throughout the United States. I'm actually not surprised of the static itself since it would make sense where they would go once in the United States. As Mexico being the closest to the United States its obvious how they would just go to California then scatter through the rest of the United States. As for Puerto Rican's I really didn't know where the majority of them would be in the United States. But very cool to see!

Tori Denney's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:50 PM

Density, distribution, and scale - Density of a country or place, and distribution of where these clusters occur, has to do with migration, cities, and available work. For Mexican's in the United States, distribution is mostly along the border, coasts, or low paid work opportunities. 

Corine Ramos's curator insight, December 8, 2015 8:21 PM

Questions to Ponder: What geographic factors account for the differences in settlement patterns of those of Puerto Rican origin and those of Mexican origin?  How do these patterns shape the cultural patterns in the United States and affect particular places?


Tags: migration, USA, mapping, census, ethnicity.


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Puzzle: Put the Congressional Districts Back Together

Puzzle: Put the Congressional Districts Back Together | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Gerrymandering is the practice of redrawing congressional districts after a decadal census to favor one political party over the other.


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Noel Magee's curator insight, April 11, 2015 8:07 PM

This short, simple depiction of gerrymandering serves a strong message. Congressional districts have literally been turned into a jigsaw puzzle. While we can all agree that it is nice to have votes in our own favor, it is unfair to allow political parties to divide up the United States unfairly. It is imperative that such an important decision be fair and justifiable. For the good or our nation, gerrymandering needs to be controlled. When it comes to elections, the United States should be divided fairly and properly. Any altering of the district lines should be considered unethical, immoral, and should be made known to the public so they can decide what should be done. This type of decision affects every single individual living in America, and this should be the least of our worries. It may be beneficial to political parties at the time, but the changing of these should be an eye opener of the type of congressional "leaders" that we look to to make executive decision regarding the rest of our lives. 

 

*Module 7

Alexa Earl's curator insight, May 26, 2015 6:51 PM

This showed me how unfair gerrymandering is and how it is a total false representation of what the people want. This diagram not only showed me how it works but it also showed me how it is so unfair...

Kristen Trammell's curator insight, May 26, 2015 7:36 PM

I. Gerrymandering is the practice of redrawing congressional districts after a decadal census to favor one political party over the other. In this puzzle, the user has to place the congressional districts onto the state/county. 

 

II. I liked this puzzle. I thought it illustrated the oddity of the redrawn districts and highlighted the unfairness of the voting system. The weird shapes of the districts showed how hard the political officials would try to get a voting area where they would be supported. The unfairness is also illustrated with the idea that the congressional districts can be put into a puzzle, where a fair district would be shaped like rectangles or equally sized squares. 

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Redistricting

How can cartography swing an election?  Simple.


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Miroslav Milosavljević's comment, July 27, 2013 5:56 PM
This great video example may serve students for a better understanding the term. Well done!
Dean Haakenson's curator insight, July 28, 2013 10:40 AM
Thanks Seth Dixon for Scooping this! And thanks Mr. Burton for rescooping. Great lesson for government and geography.
Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 10:14 AM
this video shows the process from which political candidates win their respective elections. gerrymandering is an illegal use of power in the respect to redistricting and moving town lines in order to pump up voting power. this is an illegal action that happens countless times in elections and taper to higher powers. this gerrymandering idea takes the voter power to elect and puts it into the hands of the actual political personnel. by reshaping you can stack votes into one particular area this way you are guaranteed to win that district. this is where you see districts with these crazy shaped areas rather than nice square or other simple shapes.
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Urban Areas and Income Inequality

Urban Areas and Income Inequality | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 12, 2013 3:51 PM

What do these maps tell you?


Tags: statistics, census, mapping.

Alejandro Restrepo's comment, February 13, 2013 6:25 PM
The difference in incomes in this city is astronomical. Literally from one neighborhood to the next you can notice the difference.
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National Atlas: Interactive Mapmaker

National Atlas: Interactive Mapmaker | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

The National Atlas that is available online has an extensive database for simple online mapping.  This is "GIS-light," an easy way to explore the spatial patterns within U.S. census data and other data sets.  The lists all contain a wide variety of variables, making this a good way to get students to explore potential research topics.  Thanks to the Connecticut Geographic Alliance coordinator for suggesting this link.   


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, August 27, 2012 11:10 AM
I think this website is great! I can see myself using this in a classroom. It provides a clear visual for students and anyone in general to view statistics on a variety of content.
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Local Life Expectancies

Local Life Expectancies | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

We often talk about life expectancy data at the national level; this simplification has a great deal of utility but obscures regional distinctions within a country.  Some counties in the United States have life expectancies on par with Japan (84), while the worst off counties are more similar to Indonesia (69).  Even more startling, in 661 counties, life expectancy stopped dead or went backwards for women since 1999.  This is a dramatic look at the importance of scale within any geographic analysis to arrive at reasonable conclusions.  So let's start looking at local demographic data instead of just nationally aggregated data.  For more on this press release, see:  http://www.healthmetricsandevaluation.org/news-events/news-release/girls-born-2009-will-live-shorter-lives-their-mothers-hundreds-us-counties


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Courtney Burns's curator insight, September 18, 2013 10:10 AM

Typically when I think about the average life expectancy today I think of how it has increased over the years. However I never thought of looking at it broken down into gender and area. When it is broken down the life expectancy of women is not increasing like it used too and in some places is even going down. In the graph it says that 54,000 women die every year because of excess salt. That stat is crazy! Even though that may not be a huge percentage of our population. It is something that can be monitored more and prevented. It would be interesting to see why people live longer in certain areas. What is it about specific areas that these people are living the longest? Even though the average life expectancy as a whole as increased I think we should look more into the decrease of life expectancy of women and why men's life expectancy's are increasing so much in comparison to women. 

Shelby Porter's comment, September 19, 2013 1:59 PM
When I hear about life expectancy the first thought that pops into my head is that the U.S. must have a great life expectancy considering all the medicines and treatments we have available. But when I read that since such a large numbers of counties have seen woman life expectancy stop dead or go backwards since 1999, I was absolutely shocked! Why was the life expectancy of women's dropping in so many more counties, an why weren't the men's life expectancy also dropping?And why is it that women live the longest in North Dakota and men in Iowa? Reading further, we see that a large percentage of women dying each year is because of excess salt and a large percentage of men dying each year is because of smoking. Both of these things can be prevented, but yet we still see many Americans do them. One good thing we learn from this is that African American males life expectancy has improved greatly over the past two decades. I would be interested to find out why that is, and if it could help the rest of the population also increase their life expectancy.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 5:36 PM

Life expectancies do vary.  I know that one of my grandmothers died around when she was 60, and my other grandfather just passed away at age 84.  I am 23 years old, and the difference between their death ages is close to 24; one lived a whole "one of my current lifetimes" more than the other, which is strange to think about.  All that I've ever known can fit into the time that one lived longer than the other.  Life is transient, but just that.  The "death expectancy" is that everyone will die, absolutely.  No exceptions.  I was given a paper from a friend in high school, one of those motivational readings, on "What will you do with your 'dash'?"  It referred to gravestones, ie) someone lived from 1927-2012.  The two dates aren't really what matter, but the 'dash' in between, and how we choose to spend our lives is the true part that really matters!  So know what to expect, on average and based on where you are from, and be prepared for some differences from that average, but make your 'dash' truly matter! After all, it's the most we can do...

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WSJ Census Map Maker

WSJ Census Map Maker | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Draw your own district...

 

An easy way to have students work on a neighborhood projects and still get them to have a cartographic component to the project.  A Facebook or Twitter account is needed to login (but that isn't to difficult to manage in most classroom settings). 


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User Friendly GIS for U.S. Census Data

User Friendly GIS for U.S. Census Data | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Mapping America: Every City, Every Block."  Browse local data from the Census Bureau's American Community Survey, which was conducted from 2005 to 2009.  This is super easy to use for students accustomed to internet browsing. 


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Gerrymandering Visualized

Gerrymandering Visualized | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
By simplifying gerrymandering we see how problematic it really is.

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Aaron Burnette's curator insight, February 10, 9:58 AM

Gerrymandering is when a party redraws boundaries so it gains only supportive feedback.

Kiersten Wright's curator insight, February 10, 6:39 PM

I agree that the process should be taken out of human hands. Why not take advantage of the technology we possess? Although the visuals are simplistic, they accurately depict the inequity. Gerrymandering is unfair, and definitely does not reflect the idea of a fair government that we aspire to be. - K.W.

Rylee English's curator insight, February 18, 10:10 AM

this article breaks down gerrymandering through visualizations. after reading this and looking at the visual representations, gerrymandering makes alot more sense. the author did not give information as to consequences or why gerrymandering occurs. RE

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Where We Came From, State by State

Where We Came From, State by State | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Charts showing how Americans have moved between states for 112 years.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 14, 2014 1:20 PM

This incredible series of interactive charts from the New York Times show where the residents of every U.S. state were born and how that data has changed over time (update: now available as an interactive map).  This graph of Florida shows that around 1900, most people living in Florida were from the South.  Around the middle of the 20th century more people from other parts of the U.S. and from outside the U.S. started moving in.  What changes in U.S. society led to these demographic shifts?  How has demographics of your state changes over the last 114 years? 

   

On the flip side, many people have been leaving California and this article charts the demographic impact of Californians on other states.  


Tags: migration, USAvisualization, census, unit 2 population.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 17, 2014 3:42 PM

APHG-U2

samantha benitez's curator insight, November 22, 2014 2:51 PM

Charts showing how Americans have moved between states for 112 years. helps show the nature of change around the United States and its impact in the enviorment.

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America’s most gerrymandered congressional districts

America’s most gerrymandered congressional districts | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A brief overview of crimes against geography in the 113th Congress.

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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 2014 10:04 AM

This concept is used to favor certain political parties in certain areas. There are rules like the ditrict has to be all connected but they can manipulate the redrawing to make it that a certain party still wins that district.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:29 PM

A showing of the gerrymandering districts of the most absurd kind.

Gerrymandering bases itself off the place of the districts in an attempt to sway voting in favor of one party or another or even for the most equal by dealing with similar human characteristics.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 30, 2014 3:15 PM

unit 4

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2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map

2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:28 AM

By looking at this data sheet you can see that the worlds population will increase by the millions in 2050. These populations will increase in areas that are already very populated and in areas that are not so heavily populated yet. 

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:00 PM

This is an interactive map where you can click the year you wish and see what the population is or will be. it allows a person to observe and understand population growth better.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:21 PM

A straightforward map that puts previous knowledge (of the rapidly growing population and the limited food supply) into prescriptive. -UNIT 2

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American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration

American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"David Greene talks to writer Jeremy Miller about the American Centroid. That's the place where an imaginary, flat, weightless and rigid map of the U.S. would balance perfectly if all 300 million of us weighed the exact same."


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 2:23 AM

The centre of population in the USA has moved further inland and southward compared to Australia. Comparing urbanisation in USA and Australia.

Blake Welborn's curator insight, November 11, 2013 10:33 PM

Informative, short podcast that details the changing migration of the US. This allows for the comparison of migration and time and the effects of migration over the years in the US. 

Emily Bian's curator insight, October 17, 2014 7:32 PM

The center of the U.S. population moves about every 10 years. 

In our APHUG textbook, it also talked about the center moving west. It also talks about the patterns and shifts of migration in the U.S going more west and south now, than before. I wonder if the trend will continue?  

It relates because we talked about this map in APHUG class, and it was in the textbook. The population trend is moving Southwest.

This is interesting for next year's APHUG students, because they get to see a population trend right in the US! It's a good article to think about why population trends are the way it is.

2) migration

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Rich Blocks, Poor Blocks

Rich Blocks, Poor Blocks | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Income maps of every neighborhood in the U.S. See wealth and poverty in places like New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Miami, and more.

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Alejandro Restrepo's curator insight, February 13, 2013 6:22 PM

Very interesting aspect of our demographics here in Central Falls. Any one with an interest in demographics and the make up our city should take a look a this and compare it to other neighborhoods in Rhode Island. Knowledge is power. Empower yourself!

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 14, 2013 2:16 PM

Can you find your neighborhood HUGGERS?

Allison Anthony's curator insight, February 16, 2013 10:25 AM

Compare the neighborhoods in and around your area.  What trends do you see?  Any surprises?

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Census Data Mapper

Census Data Mapper | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"This web mapping application provides users with a simple interface to view, customize, save and print thematic maps of the United States, using data from the 2010 Census.  The beta version contains a set of 2010 Census data relating to age and sex, population and race, and family and housing in the United States by county or equivalent entity." 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 23, 2013 12:20 PM

This month the U.S. Census Bureau has released the beta version of a very nice online mapping tool to display the 2010 data.  The mapper will create PDF versions of any map produced online (file sizes from 20-55KB) and the user can export the raw data to Excel.  While the user is more limited in how to display the data than they would using a GIS, this is a simple way to explore some of the basic census information.


Tags: statistics, census, GIS, mapping, cartography.


Jen-ai's curator insight, January 24, 2013 2:11 PM

mmm data. This tool is really useful for anyone planning on servicing an area with grown food. You can see the demographics of your chosen geographical area quickly.

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The Connected States of America

The Connected States of America | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"This interactive map shows the county to county social interactions given in total call minutes or total number of SMS from the anonymous, aggregated AT&T mobile phone data. Click into your county or type it into the text box to find out how it is connected to other counties in the US. You can switch between call and SMS data to reveal the changes in interaction mode. Also, the population map is provided, which is based on the 2010 Census."               -Martin Daumiller 

For more from this curator, see: http://www.scoop.it/t/wit-wisdom


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Census count finds decreasing white population in 15 states

Census count finds decreasing white population in 15 states | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Non-Hispanic whites make up a dwindling share of the nation’s population, as their numbers drop in the Northeast and Midwest and grow slowly in the South and West.

 

A while back we looked at the changing demographics of black America, now it's time to look at the changes in white America. Why is this happening? What economic, cultural, demographic and political factors contribute to this pattern? What push factors and pull factors are at work?

 

Also, look at the interactive graphic, with mappable census data from the last 30 years, aggregated at the county level, or even block level. Link at: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/special/nation/census/2010/


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Interactive Map: Where Americans Are Moving

Interactive Map: Where Americans Are Moving | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
More than 10 million Americans moved from one county to another during 2008. The map below visualizes those moves. Click on any county to see comings and goings: black lines indicate net inward movement, red lines net outward movement.

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Mark V's comment, August 27, 2012 11:15 AM
I thought this was interesting showing the flight from the northeast and midwest
Natalie K Jensen's curator insight, January 30, 2013 10:45 AM

This is a dynamic illustration of international migration in the US that fits nicely within Chapter 3.

Ellen Van Daele's curator insight, March 22, 2015 4:51 PM

This map show the immigration and emigration of people in the United States. It gives you a visual representation of all the people moving in and out of an area. 

 

Something I noticed by looking at the map was that there are a huge amount of people leaving and moving in the major cities. Initially I thought that there would be a larger income than outcome in the big cities but the flow seemed pretty stable.

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ArcGIS online...

ArcGIS online... | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"There are 10 variables on this United States map that you can examine from the state to the block group level, ranging from median age to tapestry segmentation to median income, population change 2000 to 2010 and more." 

 

GIS projects are now all the more accessible to a wider range of students, classrooms and schools.  All that is needed is an internet connection, an idea and a question.  Thanks to our NCGE president for suggestion this idea for the site!


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