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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Pun-Fueled Food Maps

Pun-Fueled Food Maps | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
U.S. Map + Haha + Yum = Foodnited States of America

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Julie Cidell's curator insight, March 9, 10:34 AM

Puns and maps and food all in one place; what's not to love?

zane alan berger's curator insight, March 24, 3:58 PM

This article relating to our agricultural unit boasts a fun way to view all 50 states by showing foods in the shape of a state along with a playful pun.

Paul Farias's curator insight, April 9, 1:09 PM

I think the one that got me the best, was Arrozona thats a good one!

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Windows on Earth

Windows on Earth | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Windows on Earth is an educational project that features photographs taken by astronauts on the International Space Station.  Astronauts take hundreds of photos each day, for science research, education and public outreach.  The photos are often dramatic, and help us all appreciate home planet Earth.  These images  help astronauts share their experience, and help you see Earth from a global perspective."

 

Tags: images, art, space, remote sensing, geospatial.


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tosserestonian's comment, January 18, 11:26 PM
Its tremendous
Bharat Employment's curator insight, January 19, 12:06 AM
www.bharatemployment.com
Rich Schultz's curator insight, February 11, 11:33 AM

It just doesn't get much cooler than this!

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These City Maps Are Made Out of Razor Blades and Mirror Shards

These City Maps Are Made Out of Razor Blades and Mirror Shards | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Damien Hirst loves to play provocateur. The artist makes mosaics with pharmaceuticals and sculptures with taxidermy. Now, for his latest series of paintings, he's depicting cities in conflict.

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The Transformation of Burning Man

The Transformation of Burning Man | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Burning Man takes place at the end of August every year in the barren and remote Black Rock Desert of Nevada. The weeklong festival is described by its organization as “an experiment in community, art, radical self-expression, and radical self-reliance.” Earth-bound photographers have chronicled the legacy of art, technology, design, and fashion at the event over the years, but we at Skybox wanted to know if we could capture the transformation of the city from space, with our constellation of SkySats. This is the result:

A full-fledged city of population 70,000, “Black Rock City” is built up in a matter of days, experienced for a single week, and disassembled just as quickly, leaving no trace."


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CT Blake's curator insight, September 19, 2014 12:45 PM

An interesting view of the passage of short amounts of time and human interaction in a transitory urban scene-- Burning Man.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, September 21, 2014 10:12 PM

I have a friend from Nevada and he explained how excited he was to go to Burning Man and he was almost appalled when I asked what the big deal was.  I had no idea that this huge event is put up and taken down in such a short period of time, all that quick work for a weeks worth of entertainment.  The idea to document the construction and destruction through satellite was an excellent idea, as it is more meaningful to someone than writing that it was constructed in so many days and taken down in this many.  

Alec Castagno's curator insight, September 23, 2014 11:39 AM

Burning Man is a massive and creative counterculture festival, and its surprising to learn that the majority of the camps are created by participants of the festival in whatever manner they choose. It is amazing that such a huge number of people can flock to such a remote location and in a very short amount of time build a complex, organized settlement, all for the purpose of a festival dedicated to independence and expression. What is popularly seen as a drugged out Mecca for the weird is carried out in a shockingly complex manner, and by working with the local infrastructure and providing one of their own the festival is able to be carried out year after year.

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When Google Earth Goes Awry

When Google Earth Goes Awry | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"These jarring moments expose how Google Earth works, focusing our attention on the software. They reveal a new model of representation: not through indexical photographs but through automated data collection from a myriad of different sources constantly updated and endlessly combined to create a seamless illusion; Google Earth is a database disguised as a photographic representation. These uncanny images focus our attention on that process itself, and the network of algorithms, computers, storage systems, automated cameras, maps, pilots, engineers, photographers, surveyors and map-makers that generate them.”


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 23, 2013 11:06 AM

The quote above from Clement Valla shows some of the problems with trusting too completely in a form of technology if you are not sure how it works or what its limitations are.  What does he mean when he says "Google Earth is a database disguised as a photographic representation?"  What does this have to do with the term metadata?   


Tags: cartography, visualization, mapping, art, google.

Mary Rack's curator insight, August 26, 2013 10:10 AM

This post represents a "sub-issue" which underlies many of today's  decisions: How much "information" is really a composite of items that may or may not be related? And how many of our decisions are based on those constructs? As a result, are we liviing in a "house of cards", a fantasy world that is sure to collapse around us one day? It's a scary thought. 

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, September 12, 2013 9:55 AM

I understand that this article mostly depicts the inherent limitations with our current technology within GIS systems but I mostly just found these images to be eerily and awkwardly beautiful. Art made accidentely. Thank-you flawed technology.

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137 World Landmarks and Other Crazy Google Maps Art

137 World Landmarks and Other Crazy Google Maps Art | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The Bay Area's Jenny Odell creates maddeningly complex sets of similar structures, like stadiums, nuclear plants and cargo ships.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 10, 2013 10:57 PM

I love geographically inspired art.  How many of the 137 icon features (as portrayed in Google Maps but removed from their context) can you identify?  For a higher-resolution, image and more of her art, click here


Tags: mapping, art, google, trivia.

Sean de Basti's curator insight, August 27, 2013 10:31 AM

do you know where everything is located?

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State Shape Necklaces

State Shape Necklaces | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
So much of who we are stems from where we came from. Each southern state's culture is proudly unique...just like its natives. These beautiful brass State Shape Necklaces are the perfect bold, yet subtle, way to wear your state pride.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 16, 2013 6:50 PM

This doesn't cover every state, and it may even offend some with how they've drawn the south.  Some southern states (in this northerner's mind) are not included.  Which state would you add to the list?  Any you'd remove?

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Third Rock Fire Pit

Third Rock Fire Pit | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Rick Wittrig designs each Fire Pit from one quarter inch (6.35 mm) thick carbon steel. They have an iron oxide finish/patina on the outside. The interior is coated with a high temperature resistant paint and has an 1-1/2" rain drain in the bottom.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 11, 2013 4:36 PM

This would be just about the coolest thing ever.

Emiel Mulder's curator insight, February 12, 2013 3:15 AM

Hoe gaaf! Wil ik hebben!

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Mod Podge Map Dresser

Mod Podge Map Dresser | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 12, 2013 10:10 AM

This dresser represents a gorgeous way to recycle vintage maps.  As with all crafts found on pinterest, it's takes more work than the 4 easy steps pictured, but this one is very managable.  I love geographically-themed art.  


Tags: art.

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NASA - Image of the Day

NASA - Image of the Day | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
NASA.gov brings you images, videos and interactive features from the unique perspective of America’s space agency.

 

NASA has stunning galleries of images including this link to their daily image.  The big news today about there images is that NASA has recently made the 172-page e-book Earth as Art a free download (PDF). 

 

About the Image: Portrait of Global Aerosols

"High-resolution global atmospheric modeling run on the Discover supercomputer at the NASA Center for Climate Simulation at Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., provides a unique tool to study the role of weather in Earth's climate system. The Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GEOS-5) is capable of simulating worldwide weather at resolutions of 10 to 3.5 kilometers (km).  This portrait of global aerosols was produced by a GEOS-5 simulation at a 10-kilometer resolution. Dust (red) is lifted from the surface, sea salt (blue) swirls inside cyclones, smoke (green) rises from fires, and sulfate particles (white) stream from volcanoes and fossil fuel emissions." 


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USA Watercolor Map

USA Watercolor Map | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Buy USA Watercolor Map art prints by Michael Tompsett at Imagekind.com. Shop Thousands of Canvas and Framed Wall Art Prints and Posters at Imagekind.

I'll settle for the digital image to be a poster on my website. 


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"Political Landscapes"

"Political Landscapes" | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

While touring Kevin Babola's art studio yesterday, I found this thought-provoking piece entitled ‘Political Landscapes.’ I greatly enjoyed my conversation with the artist about the political, economic and urban visions that went into this painting.  The conceptual idea behind this painting started when the artist was exploring the neighborhoods of New Bedford, MA and noticed how a sense of place can change very quickly. I dare say most cities have areas similar to the one portrayed here where the socioeconomic character changes very abruptly. While physically it might be very easy to cross from the side of the street with tenements to the neighborhood with single family homes, making that transition permanent is incredibly difficult.

 

Questions to ponder: what leads to cities having abrupt changes in the urban fabric? What might this chasm represent to people on either side of the divide? How does this impact the neighborhood institutions (schools, local government, etc.)?  Please visit the artist's webpage at: http://www.kbolaillustration.com


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 16, 2013 1:03 PM

While touring Kevin Babola's art studio yesterday, I found this thought-provoking piece entitled ‘Political Landscapes.’ I greatly enjoyed my conversation with the artist about the political, economic and urban visions that went into this painting.  The conceptual idea behind this painting started when the artist was exploring the neighborhoods of New Bedford, MA and noticed how a sense of place can change very quickly. I dare say most cities have areas similar to the one portrayed here where the socioeconomic character changes very abruptly. While physically it might be very easy to cross from the side of the street with tenements to the neighborhood with single family homes, making that transition permanent is incredibly difficult.

 

Questions to ponder: what leads to cities having abrupt changes in the urban fabric? What might this chasm represent to people on either side of the divide? How does this impact the neighborhood institutions (schools, local government, etc.)?  Please visit the artist's webpage at: http://www.kbolaillustration.com

Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 8:41 AM
this picture meant a lot to me simple due to the fact that I've lived in the city of providence for the last three years now. everywhere I look in the city shows an identical view to this picture that protrays inner-city compact houses vs grass and space of the kind of suburbs. on the right is the inner-city version where houses are only separated by a one car width driveway and are two to three stores high to accommadate more families and people. the left side of the picture protrays a more suburb area of the city. but this area isn't necessarily the suburbs because it would be an area just minute outside of the busy city center like a north providence or east providence area. in north providence yes you technically have a yard and grass but it is so small that you mine as well have scissors to cut the lawn. with a bite more space houses being more single family oriented this is more luxurious than the left side of the picture
Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 1:27 PM

This pictures shows the difference between the city and suburbs. Even in the same city, you can  have some parts that look more economically wealthier. But looking at it from a political view, I would guess that the whole in the ground that divides the two neighborhoods would be the line that divides democrats and republicans. City folk tend to vote more democrat because they want the government to assist the people. WHile Republicans tend to look out more for themselves.

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Le Paper Globe

Le Paper Globe | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Le Paper Globe is a template for a DIY terrestrial globe.  Not only will it look neat in your living room, it is also a very good learning tool for Geography and Geometry."  It is free to download and comes complete with instructions.  It is not as easy as it may appear, but produces a very high quality globe (that you can have colored before you begin assembling).    


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Human Landscapes of Canada

Human Landscapes of Canada | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Canada is a massive country, yet it has one of the lowest population densities in the world. Despite this, Canadians have made a wide impact on their land, much of it visible from aerial and satellite photography. Hydroelectric facilities, roads, mines, farms, ports, resource exploration, logging, canals, cities, and towns have altered much of the landscape over the years.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 10, 4:39 PM

This is a great set of images showing the human impact on the environment, with a special nod to our neighbors for the north.  These images have an artistic beauty and I hope every geographer maintains a sense of wonder at the details and beauty of the Earth. 


TagsCanada, images, art, remote sensing, land use, landscape

Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 23, 1:02 AM
http://www.bharatemployment.com/
Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, March 8, 11:20 AM

Un vrai plaisir

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Windows on Earth

Windows on Earth | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Windows on Earth is an educational project that features photographs taken by astronauts on the International Space Station.  Astronauts take hundreds of photos each day, for science research, education and public outreach.  The photos are often dramatic, and help us all appreciate home planet Earth.  These images  help astronauts share their experience, and help you see Earth from a global perspective."

 

Tags: images, art, space, remote sensing, geospatial.


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tosserestonian's comment, January 18, 11:26 PM
Its tremendous
Bharat Employment's curator insight, January 19, 12:06 AM
www.bharatemployment.com
Rich Schultz's curator insight, February 11, 11:33 AM

It just doesn't get much cooler than this!

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This brilliant illustration shows how much public space we've surrendered to cars

How lopsided the the proportions of an urban street corner really are.

 

Most roads in the US are built for cars, not for pedestrians. Whether we're happy or unhappy with this, most of us are aware of it.

But this brilliant illustration, made by Swedish artist Karl Jilg and commissioned by the Swedish Road Administration, shows just how extreme the situation truly is — even in an urban business district that's designed with pedestrians in mind. 

 

Tags: urban, transportation, planning, art.


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Top 20 Earth Images

Top 20 Earth Images | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
With five satellites scanning the globe, DigitalGlobe has collected impressive imagery of planet Earth this year. Check out their top 20 images here.

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Alex Schaerer's curator insight, December 5, 2013 11:50 AM

Incredible images of Mother Earth. It is all of our responsibility to look past our short term existence here to ensure that she flourishes for millenia for our future generations. 

Joy Kinley's curator insight, December 6, 2013 10:49 AM

The views of Earth from Space are fascinating.  Mountains, deserts, volcanoes, islands all seen from above.  My favorite is the city of Aleppo. What is yours?

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:31 PM
Five satellites have taken some of the most amazing photos of amazing places all over the world. The photos show the beauty of each place some places i never even knew existed.
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Earth Structural Layer Cake

Earth Structural Layer Cake | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"One of their lessons [in a series involving geologic sciences] involved teaching the kids about the structure of the Earth. One of her friends came up with the idea of presenting a model of the Earth made out of cake. So my sister asked me if I could make a spherical cake with all the layers of the Earth inside it."


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Canberra Girls Grammar GSSF's comment, September 1, 2013 10:30 PM
Year 8 Unit 1
Courtney Burns's curator insight, December 7, 2013 7:58 PM

I think that this came out awesome! I definetly don't think that I would be able to pull something like this off. However what I found intersting about this was that it was like a cake map. Students were able to get a visual about what the earth's core is like. It visually shows them all the different layers of the earth. Just by visually seeing the cake like this will help a lot more kids to remember this lesson. Also by the baker putting the countries in their accurate locations makes this cake even that much better. They are veiwing a map and they don't even know it. I think this cake is a great tool to use to show students just how the earth is actually made up. By allowing the students to visually see it also makes it more likely for them to remember the material. Viewing maps can teach so much, which is why I think this "cake map" is an awesome way to teach and get the kids attention!

Michelle Winemiller's curator insight, January 22, 11:07 AM

project option we currently do for this unit

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Atlas of True Names

Atlas of True Names | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

The Atlas of True Names reveals the etymological roots, or original meanings,
of the familiar terms on today's maps of the World, Europe, the British Isles and the United States.

For instance, where you would normally expect to see the Sahara indicated,
the Atlas gives you "The Tawny One", derived from Arab. es-sahra “the fawn coloured, desert”.


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John Blunnie's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:12 AM

True names give these maps a unique and historic twist.

Carol Thomson's curator insight, July 17, 2013 4:57 AM

I loved looking at the map of great britain.  I hope it grabs my pupils' attention as an introduction to maps.

Amy Marques's curator insight, July 31, 2013 7:19 PM

Great to see what the original names where! Especially for those that are similar to its current name and those that are completely irrelevant!

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Geographic Presents...

Geographic Presents... | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 13, 2013 11:06 AM

I loved these cuff links that I my wife got me for our anniversary, so I thought this bracelet would be a great Valentine's Day gift for her.  Want to make your own?  Then read on. 


Tags: art.

Dr. Kathleen Contreras's comment, February 17, 2013 3:02 AM
Where did you purchase the bracelet? Love it!
Seth Dixon's comment, April 22, 2013 10:06 PM
The bracelet was made by http://www.hotcakesdesign.com/braceletmain.html
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Flag Food

Flag Food | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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dilaycock's curator insight, February 4, 2013 10:02 PM

Now here's an interesting activity for students!

Mark Slusher's curator insight, February 9, 2013 8:46 AM

Now THIS is geographical food for thought! Talk about conquering a nation!

Emily Larsson's comment, September 10, 2013 8:15 PM
I love that! It's so creative. Whoever came up with the idea to do this as an advertisement for the international food festival did a great job. They all look so delicious. Food festivals are a great way to experience other cultures.
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Middle-Earth gets a Geological Makeover

Middle-Earth gets a Geological Makeover | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
"As if J. R. R. Tolkien wasn’t brilliant enough with his creation of Middle-Earth, it appears that using his numerous maps and illustrations provided, supplemented by observations from within the texts themselves, a geological reconstruction can be achieved! I recently came across this old article from the Proceedings of the J. R. R. Tolkien Centenary Conference, Oxford, England, 1992, and figured it was worth sharing."
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 13, 2012 8:57 AM

As many Lord of the Rings fans prepare for the release of the new Hobbit movie, I wanted to share two things that might be of interest.  First this article is linked to a geologic 'reconstruction' of Middle Earth.  Added to this is this fabulous Middle Earth Map Dress (complete with the traveling cloak collar, the Tengwar script on the belt and hem, and the matching clutch with the one ring). 


Why are do we study geography?  As Samwise Gamgee reminded us, we need to remember “that there’s some good in this world, Mr. Frodo… and it’s worth fighting for.” 

geofoodgraz's curator insight, December 15, 2012 4:36 AM

 

 Seth Dixon, Ph.D.'s insight:

"As many Lord of the Rings fans prepare for the release of the new Hobbit movie, I wanted to share two things that might be of interest.  First this article is linked to a geologic 'reconstruction' of Middle Earth.  Added to this is this fabulous Middle Earth Map Dress (complete with the traveling cloak collar, the Tengwar script on the belt and hem, and the matching clutch with the one ring). "


Why are do we study geography?  As Samwise Gamgee reminded us, we need to remember “that there’s some good in this world, Mr. Frodo… and it’s worth fighting for.” 

Danielle Boucher's curator insight, January 24, 2013 5:51 PM

Brilliant!

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World Necklace

World Necklace | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

I'm sure someone out there would absolutely love this. 

 


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Strange Things in Google Maps

Strange Things in Google Maps | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

This site "Map of Strange" is dedicated to showing strange things that can be seen in Google Maps. Displayed here is a beach that I loved to go to growing up in San Diego.  Coronado is written in large stones on this part of the beach right next to the red roof of the famous Hotel Del Corondo (this tab is labeled 'writing of the beach').


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Why We Travel...

Why We Travel... | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

So go 'read' some more (Extra credit for identifying the location)!


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Kendall Dickson's comment, September 11, 2012 9:21 PM
St. Augustine hit this saying out of the ball park. Sometimes when I try taking picutres of the sky or of a scene, I will delete the picture because it just isnt the same as in realy life. I really think that traveling gives people a reality shock when seeing new phenomena.
Lydia Blevins's comment, September 12, 2012 10:14 PM
What i think this quote means is that you may think you know a lot about the world but until you go and travel to different places you will not fully understand the world. I also think it means that there is so many different things to experience on earth.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 3, 11:09 AM

For the wanderlust in all of us.