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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Peru Is Indignant After Greenpeace Makes Its Mark on Ancient Site

Peru Is Indignant After Greenpeace Makes Its Mark on Ancient Site | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A sign urging environmental action during a United Nations summit meeting on climate change was placed near a 1,000-year-old geoglyph that is a cultural treasure in Peru. Officials are outraged over the trespassing and the disturbance of the ancient grounds.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 13, 2014 5:23 PM

Greenpeace is falling for some of the same social media fails as the selfie generation.  Peruvian authorities are angry that Greenpeace activists damaged a forbidden archeological site that is both a national symbol and sacred site.  UN climate talks are taking place in Peru right now, so this Greenpeace publicity stunt becomes all the more ironic.  The Peruvian government is accusing them of irrevocably damaging the environment at this site.  Here is an article about how the environmental community was impacted by this Greenpeace stunt.


TagsreligionSouth AmericaPeru, environment.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 14, 2014 10:34 AM

This is something that absolutely mortifies me. As the United Nations climate change summit met in Peru, Greenpeace thought to make a stance. Greenpeace decided to trespass onto some of Peru's most sacred, ancient, and mysterious grounds, the Nazca lines. These geoglyphs are thousands of years old, and no one is quite sure what they mean or why they were made. The lines have remained because of the dry, windless climate in the valley allowing for the dirt to remain undisturbed. Greenpeace, without permission, decided to set up fabric lettering in the soil next to one of the most iconic figures. Officials are outraged because not only was it trespassing, but the eco group may have irreversibly damaged the site. Greenpeace responded with a very "sorry not sorry" apology, and Peru is looking towards pressing charges. 


Many remain divided on their outlook on radical environmentalists such as Greenpeace. While they may be spouting good ideas in regards to helping the environment, at what point does it become eco-terrorism? In this instance, the lack of consideration that they have shown towards another country rivals that of the same actions that they themselves are aiming to stop. 

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, January 28, 9:27 PM

Greenpeace might have went too far on this one.  It is one thing to want to protest something or have your voice heard, but to break the law, especially doing so in such a highly recognizable and sacred place, is stupid and makes them look really bad.  To think that a simple "i'm sorry'' is going to get them off the hook is ludicrous.  They need to be charged and made an example off.  If they get off with just an apology, they could be potentially opening up the floodgates for other protests or lobbyists to do the same thing in other highly recognizable places. They probably could have done this through computer imaging to get their point across and nobody would be upset and nothing destroyed.  Great job Greenpeace! 

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Geography of Quinoa

Geography of Quinoa | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The popularity of Quinoa has grown exponentially among the health-conscious food consumers in the developed economies of the world.  Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wah) is rich in protein and is a better grain for those seeking to lose weight.  Quinoa has historically be rather limited but this diffusion is restructuring the geographic patterns of many places." 


Via Seth Dixon
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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 14, 2014 11:42 AM

With health nuts discovering Quinoa the demand for this protein packed weight loss grain is quickly increasing throughout the world it is hard to keep up with supply.  Quinoa is typically grown in the Andes Mountains, limiting the area of which it can be grown.  The increase in demand for this superfood is also affecting the locals who used this as an item in their daily meals.  With production down and demand up the price is on the rise, even for those locals who had enjoyed this grain for relatively cheap for a good amount of time. 

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 4, 2014 2:20 PM

Quinoa has a seen an explosion of popularity on international markets due to its healthy nature, simple preparation, and culinary versatility. While its increased trade has helped bring more money to the farmers and the region, it has also made the price of quinoa too high for many of the locals. To limit the availability of such a staple food to the locals could have many detrimental effects. It shows how expanding into the global arena can have good economic effect for some, it can still undermine other parts of the already established economy.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 12:15 PM

Quinoa has gone from a traditional food only consumed by those living in the Andes Mountains to a global phenomenon. Historically, Quinoa was consumed by locals in the Andes Mountains in order to supplement their diet. Recently, it has developed a reputation as a super food, with people claiming that it can help lose weight and has tremendous health benefits. While this may be true, food fads such as this have the potential to greatly affect the historic growers. Since its boom on the global market, Quinoa has become incredibly expensive. The people that once depended on it for sustenance can no longer afford it, thus leading to economic and food issues in these localities. It is important to understand that these exotic, popular foods can maim entire ways of life where the foods were once just foods, and not super foods. 

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Geography of Quinoa

Geography of Quinoa | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The popularity of Quinoa has grown exponentially among the health-conscious food consumers in the developed economies of the world.  Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wah) is rich in protein and is a better grain for those seeking to lose weight.  Quinoa has historically be rather limited but this diffusion is restructuring the geographic patterns of many places." 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 14, 2014 11:42 AM

With health nuts discovering Quinoa the demand for this protein packed weight loss grain is quickly increasing throughout the world it is hard to keep up with supply.  Quinoa is typically grown in the Andes Mountains, limiting the area of which it can be grown.  The increase in demand for this superfood is also affecting the locals who used this as an item in their daily meals.  With production down and demand up the price is on the rise, even for those locals who had enjoyed this grain for relatively cheap for a good amount of time. 

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 4, 2014 2:20 PM

Quinoa has a seen an explosion of popularity on international markets due to its healthy nature, simple preparation, and culinary versatility. While its increased trade has helped bring more money to the farmers and the region, it has also made the price of quinoa too high for many of the locals. To limit the availability of such a staple food to the locals could have many detrimental effects. It shows how expanding into the global arena can have good economic effect for some, it can still undermine other parts of the already established economy.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 12:15 PM

Quinoa has gone from a traditional food only consumed by those living in the Andes Mountains to a global phenomenon. Historically, Quinoa was consumed by locals in the Andes Mountains in order to supplement their diet. Recently, it has developed a reputation as a super food, with people claiming that it can help lose weight and has tremendous health benefits. While this may be true, food fads such as this have the potential to greatly affect the historic growers. Since its boom on the global market, Quinoa has become incredibly expensive. The people that once depended on it for sustenance can no longer afford it, thus leading to economic and food issues in these localities. It is important to understand that these exotic, popular foods can maim entire ways of life where the foods were once just foods, and not super foods. 

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Photographing Iconic Landmarks

Photographing Iconic Landmarks | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Oh, Machu Picchu, ancient city of the Incas, pride of Peru, must-see travel destination: You've never been so appropriately photobombed by a llama.

Via Seth Dixon
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James Hobson's curator insight, September 29, 2014 10:23 PM

(South America topic 4)

Aside from the fact that I find this to be the funniest thing I've seen all week, I honestly think that this and other relevant cultural 'photobombs' would make an excellent marketing strategy for promoting tourism. Many people (including myself) can forget the wide array of sites to see when visiting any particular location. The mountains of Peru aren't just home to ancient ruins; they also are the home of llamas (including this one with a nice sense of humor!). Reminders of the additional things to see such as llamas in this example may be the deciding factor in choosing a vacation destination, which translates into which places get the tourism business.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:59 PM

While humorous these pictures really show that certain areas and regions are often imagined by a set and specific image. When Machu Picchu is thought of it is always seen from the same peak, making this an incredibly popular photo spot for tourists, or in this case a llama.  

Michael Eiseman's curator insight, December 18, 2014 7:19 PM

#LlamaHam we at www.viptourgroup.com have about 20 pictures of Llamas that are pretty photogenic. I have one that was stuck in a split tree on purpose in Salta Argentina.  Seems they have personality! and want to get a few bucks now for a photo. #paytoplay hipsters.