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Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education

Sryrian Migrants On Greek Island Of Kos

A Greek police officer brandished a knife and slapped a migrant while others sprayed fire extinguishers to break up crowds of migrants and asylum seekers on the Greek island of Kos. The UNHCR is calling the migrant crisis a “humanitarian emergency.”

Via Seth Dixon
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 12, 2:05 PM

Not since the end of World War II have there been so many refugees seeking safety.  There are several regional hot spots of political, ethnic and religious turmoil; many are now asking how the global community should response to the worst refugee crisis in generations.

Tags: migration, political, refugees, Greece, Syria.

Fred Issa's curator insight, September 9, 3:05 PM

Where is the United Nations in wave after wave of human tragedy? People leaving their homes with the clothes on their back, many dying before journeys end. Quiet Greek Islands are overwhelmed by the tens of thousands of people fleeing from ISIS and war. These poor people have no food, little or no money, and less hope that they are going to be able to reach some safe haven for their families. Fred Issa

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education

Walled World

We chart the routes of, and reasons for, the barriers which are once again dividing populations

Via Seth Dixon
Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 2014 6:51 PM

Walls are a symbol of political boundaries and motives, usually intended to keep certain people in or out. This website in particular clearly highlights this idea in human geography as it explores the various walls that mark our landscape and thus contribute to changing policies and borders. Walls can also affect the landscape, not just mark it, as an effect of asserting either political dominance or border policies, as best seen by the resulting environmental results that come from it and the displacement of people (as seen on Palestinian-Israeli border). 

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 2014 1:06 AM

We looked at this map in class its really interesting nd weird to see all the dividing walls in the world and to discover ones youve never seen before.

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 12, 9:53 PM

The video attached to this article reminded me made me think "racism". It is not Americas first time targeting one cultural group and antagonizing them. We did it to the Indians, Jews, at one time we denied Chinese immigrants the right to enter the country or become a citizen. The projection of walls in my opinion only creates more room for crime. I would love to research what benefits its had. I think the world is lacking the understand that people are people .period. This segregation and division is so unnecessary and creates wars, tension, hostility, and divide.


Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education

The Greek island of old age

The Greek island of old age | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The inhabitants of a small Greek island live on average 10 years longer than the rest of western Europe. So what's the secret to long life in Ikaria?

Via Seth Dixon
Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's insight:

As more countries have entered the later stages of the Demographic Transition, we expect people to live longer than ever.  On this island and other "blue zones" they attribute their long life to a traditional diet and an unpolluted environment.  


Tags: aging population, medical, population, demographics, unit 2 population, Greece, Europe.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, November 1, 2014 9:09 PM

According to this article, The people of the small Greek Island of Ikaria have a life expectancy that is 10 years longer than any other part of the world. It is attributed  to the nutritious diet that the citizens have and the lack of influence that the outside world has on other places. With less environmental factors to harm it, Ikaria is one of the most geographically advantageous places to live a healthy life.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 11:07 AM

Scientists are always coming across new evidence proving that specific lifestyles, foods, and activities are what allow some to live longer than others, but maybe we need to look at life length at a geographic level. These places where people live longer, healthier lives must have some common threads linking them. It could be similar cultural constructs that are endemic to these places, promoting healthy habits, a sense of community, and overall peaceful lifestyles. 


Oddly enough, most of his daily routines, such as drinking tea, using local honey, drinking wine, and leading an active lifestyle, are touted by different scientists and salespeople as to keys to longevity. I think, that these routines combined with a great sense of community, lack of stress, and happiness lead to long life. The community on this island is very close knit, and many people live happily. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 12, 11:06 AM

I really believe that the clean air of this island could have something to do with the life expectancy being higher.  The less toxins you breathe in the less of a chance you will have to developing cancers and other diseases.  


Now as to how this gentleman defeated lung cancer after moving from the U.S. to Ikaria is a whole other story.  Maybe the wine did help.  Maybe leaving a dirty and toxin-ridden environment helped kill the cancer.  Bare minimum, this article definitely shines the light on the air-quality in certain parts of the world.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education

Pressed by Debt Crisis, Doctors Leave Greece in Droves

Pressed by Debt Crisis, Doctors Leave Greece in Droves | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Greece is losing professionals as they flee for more stable employment elsewhere, and the health care sector has been particularly hard hit.


Tags: Greece, Europe, migration, supranationalism, currency, economic.

Via Seth Dixon
cantatapledge's comment, July 3, 6:34 AM
Thats brilliant
Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 6:45 AM

The economic troubles in Greece have dominated the headlines in Europe and the United States over the past few years. One major consequence of the continuing economic struggle is the fleeing of talented individuals from the nation of Greece. One of the hardest hit sectors in the Greek economy, is the heath care sector. Trained medical professionals are fleeing Greece in droves for better economic opportunities  elsewhere. The consequences of this mass migration from Greece can not be overstated. A nation needs talented people in order to survive. The loss of talented professionals sends a bad message to the rest of the country. The message sent to the people is basically, our nation is no longer viable enough to keep our most talented people living here.  This trend will likely continue as the Greek government has yet to come up with a viable solution to their debt crises.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education

What if Greece quits the euro?

What if Greece quits the euro? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A Greek exit from the euro has become a bomb fizzling at the heart of the eurozone. What could happen if it explodes?

Via Seth Dixon
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 2014 5:05 PM

Money controls everything. Because parliament has to make some budget cuts, money must be spent elsewhere. Because of this, Greece leaving the euro could lead to a downward spiral including a sovereign debt crisis, a recession and political backlash. Should Greece keep the euro?

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 2014 8:02 AM

This article explains eight possible outcomes of Greece leaving the Euro Zone. None of them favorable for Europe, except maybe the UK which could possibly borrow more cheaply. For the rest of Europe, the results are either increased burdens for the more economically strong EZ nations like Germany, or a domino effect which accelerates the decline of the struggling economies of countries like Italy and Spain.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, November 2, 2014 8:09 PM

If Greek were to quit/ be forced out of the Euro, according to this article, would not bode well for the country. As the graph suggests, Greece would experience multiple consequences if their vote fail then Greece will possibly suffer a government shutdown due to the debt they find themselves in.